Programs and Fields of Study

Programs and Fields of Study

Graduate students in History are admitted to work within a particular program that defines a broad temporal and geographic area.  The faculty supports a number of more specific fields of study within and across these programs.  A field corresponds to a segment of history encompassing a variety of problems and with a body of literature rich enough to nurture the development of a professional historian.  It is an area that, at the conclusion of his or her studies, the student should be prepared to teach.  Students will be examined in three fields of study whose breadth and content will be determined by the advisor and two other examiners.

Ancient Europe

Further Details and Information about Admission to the Ph.D. Program in Ancient History

Ph.D. students in the interdisciplinary field of Ancient History are expected to take courses in the History Department but also courses in other departments (such as Classics, Art, and Religious Studies) while preparing to be examined in two major fields of study, Greek and Roman History, and to pass four language exams.  The third Ph.D. examination field is chosen in consultation with the advisor, but can involve, e.g., the historical study of a post-classical epoch or work in another discipline such as historiography or archaeology.  Ph.D. students in Ancient History are expected to pass mastery-level exams in French and German and the MA-level exams in Greek and Latin set for their own students by the Classics Department; at least one of these four exams must have been passed by the time the student sits the Ph.D. qualifying exam in the History Department, although it is naturally best to pass as many of them as soon as possible. Extensive language training is therefore necessary for successful application to the program.  Ph.D. students in Ancient History typically take courses through the fall semester of the third year and their qualifying exams in January of the spring semester of the same academic year.  Ancient historians are also encouraged to participate in the Classics Department's Tuesday Lunch series, where they are welcome to present their work, and to attend the lectures in the Classics Department and those sponsored by the Archaeological Institute of America.

Faculty: in History, J. E. Lendon (Greek and Roman history; politics; government; foreign affairs; war); E. A. Meyer (Greek and Roman History; ancient law and legal culture; Greek and Roman epigraphy; ancient slavery; cultures of writing); in Classics, J. W. Crawford (Cicero and Caesar); J. D. Dillery (Greek historiography); J. D. Mikalson (ancient Greek religion);  A. J. Woodman (Latin historiography); in Art, J. J. Dobbins (Pompeii, Roman urbanism, Roman art) and T. J. Smith (Greek art, vase-painting); in Religious Studies, K. Shuve (late-antique Christianity).

Graduate Students: Nicholas Lindberg; Paul BelonickLily Van DiepenTyler Creer.

Early America

Ph.D. students focusing on colonial, revolutionary, early republic, antebellum, Civil War, and Reconstruction history join an intellectual community anchored by ongoing research seminars.  They undertake coursework as well as independent reading to support two common fields of study:  Early American History, 1584-1815 and United States History, 1815-1877.  They also prepare for a third field that they define in consultation with their advisors.  Such a field typically examines subjects outside of American history, involves work in another discipline, or develops a comparative or thematic focus.   (Examples of such fields have included Early Modern England, Environmental History, the Global Economy, Atlantic World, Modern European War and Society, Enlightenment Intellectual History, Women’s and Gender History, and Material Culture Studies.)  Faculty and students at all levels of study—from first-years to doctoral candidates completing their dissertations—meet regularly during term to present and discuss original research.  Those specializing in colonial, revolutionary, and early republic history meet as the Early American Seminar at the Robert H. Smith International Center for Jefferson Studies at Monticello (and attend the Transatlantic Seminar via video conference with our counterparts at the University of Edinburgh).  Those whose focus is on antebellum, Civil War, and Reconstruction history meet as the Civil War Studies Seminar in Nau Hall.  Every year, we convene several special joint sessions of these seminars to discuss works-in-progress presented by visiting scholars, UVa faculty, and advanced graduate students.  There is no mandatory foreign language requirement for students in the Early America program.  Advisors and students will agree upon a plan for language study suited to the student’s research needs.  Students in Early America often serve as research assistants for projects such as the Papers of George Washington, the Papers of James MadisonDocuments CompassBackstory, and MapScholar.

Faculty: S. Max Edelson (Colonial British America; History of Cartography; Slavery and Plantation Societies; Digital Humanities); Gary W. Gallagher (U.S. Civil War; Memory; American Military to 1900); Justene Hill (African-American; American Slavery; U.S. Economic History; American Legal History) Andrew O’Shaughnessy (Eighteenth Century Atlantic World; British Empire); J.C.A. Stagg (Early American Republic); Alan Taylor (Colonial North America; American Revolution; Early Republic; Pre-Confederation Canada; American West); Elizabeth Varon (American South; Civil War Era; Women’s and Gender History; Intellectual and Cultural History). 

Graduate Students: Asaf AlmogWilla BrownClayton ButlerFrank Cirillo; Jessica CookDavid FlahertyJack FurnissFrank GarmonAlexandra GarrettJesse George-NicholMelissa GismondiLauren Haumesser; Alexander Humes; Elizabeth KlaczynskiKatie LantzStephanie LawtonShira Lurie; Adele McInernyScott Miller; Joshua Morrison; Brian Neumann; Emily Sackett; Nicole SchroederDavid Smith; Daniel Sunshine; Hannah Tucker; Christopher Whitehead

Early Modern World

Ph.D. students focusing on the early modern world, ca. 1400-1800, study with faculty members whose work incorporates a broad range of geographic specializations and methodological approaches to the early modern world.  Students pursue fields of study designed in close consultation with their advisors.  Coursework in the first two years prepares students for intensive dissertation research while cultivating broad teaching interests.  Examinations in three fields—whose scope and content will be determined by students in consultation with their advisors—take place before the end of the second year of study.  Foreign language requirements are determined in consultation with advisors, and reflect each student’s particular area of focus.  Most successful graduate students in early modern history enter the program with strong language preparation.  Students whose primary research language is not English must pass mastery-level examinations in at least one (and sometimes two) foreign languages prior to taking their general exams.       

Faculty: Richard Barnett (Medieval and Early Modern South Asia; Pakistan; Afghanistan; Bangladesh); S. Max Edelson (Colonial British America; History of Cartography; Slavery and Plantation Societies; Digital Humanities); Paul Halliday (Legal History; Britain and the Empire, 1500-1850), Erin Lambert (Early Modern Europe; Reformation; Visual and Aural Cultures); Brian Owensby (Latin America; Modern Brazil; Colonial Mexico; Legal History; early-modern Spanish empire in the New World); Comparative Age of Revolutions); Joshua White (Early Modern Ottoman Empire and Mediterranean; Social, Legal, and Diplomatic history); in Spanish, Italian, and Portuguese, Alison Weber (Golden Age Literature and Religious Discourse in Early Modern Spain).

Graduate Students: Asaf AlmogJason FarrDavid FlahertyDavid Smith.

East Asia

Ph.D. students in East Asian History at the University of Virginia join a thriving community of scholars and students working in conjunction with the University’s interdisciplinary East Asia Center and allied disciplines. Students in East Asian History prepare for comprehensive examinations in two East Asian fields (China and Japan) with one of these constituting the primary focus of study. Sub-field concentrations within these two fields, temporal or thematic, are to be defined in consultation with the student’s advisor. Students are also required to prepare a third field in either History or a related discipline that complements the primary focus of study.

Entering students are expected to have a command of either Chinese or Japanese, depending on the focus of study. Demonstration of adequate language skill, either through mastery examination or research in the target language, is expected by the end of the second year of study. Study of additional languages may also be required depending upon a student’s dissertation topic.

Faculty: Liu Xiaoyuan (China’s ethnic-frontier affairs in international politics; Chinese-American relations in the 20th century; East Asian international history); Bradly Reed (Late Imperial and Modern China; Local administrative structures and practice; Late Imperial and Republican law); Robert Stolz (Modern Japan; Social Theory); Ellen Zhang (Song China; elite culture; social and family history).

Graduate Students: Emily Matson.

International 

Students who choose to develop a research focus in international history may draw from strong faculty resources in the History Department. International history is a capacious field of study that has developed a rich historiography in recent years. Historians working in this area tend to examine subjects that cross borders and are unmoored from a purely national historical context. For example, international history includes the history of imperialism and colonization, economic and financial arrangements among states, diplomacy and statecraft, comparative ideologies, human rights, the cultural dimensions of international relations, war and its impact upon society, migration and refugees, genocide, epidemics and public health, cross-border movements of ideas, goods, and people, and the place of non-governmental organizations in the modern world.

In preparation for the Ph.D. qualifying examinations, international history students will be expected to develop competence in at least three historiographical areas. These areas should be identified in the first few months of the first year in the program, and will be designed in consultation with the faculty advisor. These areas might include readings in national/regional literatures, such as modern U.S., Latin American, Middle Eastern, East Asian and European history; and be supplemented by readings in such international fields as The Cold War; War and Society in the 20th Century; Human Rights in the Modern Age; Comparative Empires; The United States in the World; Globalization in History; and so on. The possibilities for combining national and international fields are almost limitless. What is therefore crucial is to define the areas of inquiry early in the program with the Ph.D. advisor.

Students who study international history will usually find it advantageous to possess foreign language skills for conducting research. Depending on the chosen field of research, additional language training may be required.

The resources at the University for the study of international history are rich, and include not only a first-class library system but active research centers such as the Center for Global Inquiry and Innovation, the Miller Center (which offers pre-doctoral fellowships for the study of modern politics and foreign affairs),  the Center for Global Health, the Center for Russian and East European Studies, the Center for South Asian Studies, the East Asia Center, the Middle East Studies Program, among others.

Faculty: Alon Confino (Modern Germany, Holocaust, and Europe; historical method and narrative; memory and cultural history; transnational history of forced migration in the modern world, with an emphasis on the 1940s and in particular on Palestine/Israel)William Hitchcock (Modern Europe; War and Society; Cold War); Melvyn Leffler (History of U.S. Foreign Relations); Erik Linstrum (Modern Britain, British Empire, and the World; Science and Technology; European Cultural and Intellectual); James Loeffler (Jewish history; European history; international history; human rights history); Brian Owensby (Latin America; Modern Brazil; Colonial Mexico; Legal History; early-modern Spanish empire in the New World); Christian McMillen (Native American; U.S. West); Jeffrey Rossman (Russia/USSR; Modern Europe; Genocide); Stephen Schuker (Modern Europe, International); Marc Selverstone (Miller Center); Philip Zelikow (Modern world, 20th century US, American foreign policy). 

Graduate Students: Mary BartonStephanie FreemanChris MaternowskiShannon Nix.

Jewish 

Ph.D. students concentrating in Jewish history find a rich cluster of specialist faculty within the History Department and across related departments and programs, including the interdisciplinary Jewish Studies Program, the Center for Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies, the Center for German Studies, and the Religious Studies Department. There are particularly strong opportunities for students interested in the modern Jewish history, with geographical focus on Modern Europe (especially Germany, Poland, and Russia), Israel, the United States, and twentieth-century transnational Jewish history. The Jewish history program leads the field in its concentration on linking traditional areas of scholarship, such as Zionism, antisemitism, and the Holocaust to emerging fields in the larger arena of historiography, including the history of human rights, forced migration, and genocide, legal history, the history of international institutions, and memory studies. Faculty have also worked closely with Jewish Studies specialists in musicology, art history, and literature to promote new directions in cultural history, including sound studies, visual aesthetics, and the history of emotions.

Entering graduate students work closely with an advisor to prepare a program of study that fits the specific disciplinary imperatives of Jewish history while also ensuring strong training in related or overlapping fields. These typically include modern European history, modern Russian/ Soviet history, modern Middle Eastern history, U.S. history, or international history. There are many exciting possibilities for combining the field of Jewish history with other geographic or methodological fields, including intellectual history, legal history, and religious history. Entering students should ideally possess a strong command of the Hebrew language and one or more other relevant languages (typically including German, Yiddish, French, Russian or Polish). Students will be expected to demonstrate language proficiency through exams. Where necessary, language coursework may be required.
 
The study of Jewish history at the University is considerably enhanced by the vibrant community of Jewish Studies doctoral students, particularly in the longstanding programs in Judaism and comparative religious studies in the Department of Religion and the German Department. Other University resources include the Miller Center (which offers pre-doctoral fellowships for the study of political history and foreign affairs), the Institute for Advanced Studies in Culture (which provides in-house doctoral fellowships), and the Law and History workshop run in conjunction with the faculty of the University of Virginia Law School.

Faculty: James Loeffler (Modern Jewish history from 1800; Russian, American and Israeli Jewry, Zionism and Jewish nationalism; human rights and international law; anti-semitism; sound studies); Alon Confino (Modern Palestine/Israel; forced migrations; 1948 in global perspective, Modern Germany; Holocaust and Genocide; memory studies); Gabriel Finder (Holocaust; Polish Jewry; Post-Holocaust Jewish life in Europe; Polish-Jewish relations; Yiddish popular culture; international law); Asher Biemann (German and Austrian Jewry; Zionism; Religious Thought; aesthetics and visual studies).

Graduate Students: Hamutal Jackobson.

Medieval Europe

Ph.D. students in the interdisciplinary field of Medieval History are expected to take courses in the History Department as well as in other departments (such as Art History, Classics, Religious Studies) while preparing to be examined in two major fields of study in Medieval History. The third Ph.D. examination field is chosen in close consultation with the advisor and is intended both to broaden and deepen a student’s control of the period and understanding of particular issues or subjects. It may be thematic or involve the study of a related discipline, for example archaeology, art history or patristic and post-patristic theology.

Ph.D. students in Medieval History are expected to pass a minimum of three language exams: mastery-level exams in German and Medieval Latin, and in at least one additional language. This may be ancient, medieval or modern, depending upon the individual focus of research. At least one of these three exams must have been passed by the time the student sits the Ph.D. qualifying exam in the History Department, but we recommend working towards all of them steadily and passing them as soon as possible.  Any successful applicant is, therefore, expected to have undertaken extensive language preparation prior to entry to the program.

Ph.D. students in Medieval History typically take courses through the fall semester of the third year, their qualifying exams following in January of the spring semester of the same academic year.

Faculty: P.J.E. Kershaw (post-Roman kingdoms; the Carolingian and sub-Carolingian world; politics and political ideas; Irish and Anglo-Saxon intellectual history); J. White (medieval and early modern Mediterranean and Middle East; law; diplomacy). Related faculty: in Art, E. Ramirez-Weaver (medieval science and astronomy; manuscript studies; art history); in Classics, G. Hays (medieval Latin literature; manuscript studies; Latin palaeography); in English, P.  Baker (Old English; Anglo-Latin; Anglo-Saxon heroic poetry); in Religious Studies, K. Shuve (late antique Christianity; exegesis).

Graduate Students: Chris HalstedDrew Sorber.

Middle Eastern

Ph.D students in Middle Eastern History at the University of Virginia join a growing interdisciplinary community of specialists on Morocco, Turkey, Syria, Lebanon, Egypt, Israel, Palestine, Iraq and Iran.  Students prepare for comprehensive examination by gaining expertise in the long durée of Middle Eastern and Islamic history as well as a specialization in a particular region and period.  Study must combine courses in the history department with courses in at least one other department (for example, Religious Studies, Middle East Languages and Cultures, Politics, Anthropology).  Study in the outside discipline will constitute a third field of examination.

Entering students are expected to have a command of a major Middle Eastern language (usually Arabic, Turkish, Hebrew or Persian) and to acquire mastery of a second language.  The second language may be a primary-source language of the Middle East or a language suited for scholarly research on the area, such as French or German.  Demonstration of adequate language skill is expected – through examination—by the end of the second year of study. 

Ph.D students in Middle Eastern History at the University of Virginia join a growing interdisciplinary community of specialists on Morocco, Turkey, Syria, Lebanon, Egypt, Israel, Palestine, Iraq and Iran.  Students prepare for comprehensive examination by gaining expertise in the long durée of Middle Eastern and Islamic history as well as a specialization in a particular region and period.  Study must combine courses in the history department with courses in at least one other department (for example, Religious Studies, Middle East Languages and Cultures, Politics, Anthropology).  Study in the outside discipline will constitute a third field of examination.

Entering students are expected to have a command of a major Middle Eastern language (usually Arabic, Turkish, Hebrew or Persian) and to acquire mastery of a second language.  The second language may be a primary-source language of the Middle East or a language suited for scholarly research on the area, such as French or German.  Demonstration of adequate language skill is expected – through examination—by the end of the second year of study. 

Faculty: Alon Confino (Israel, memory, the 1948 war), Fahad Bishara (economic and legal history of the Indian Ocean and Islamic worlds), Joshua White (early modern Ottoman history, law and diplomacy in the Mediterranean, piracy)

Modern Europe

Prospective graduate students in modern Europe should choose a focal interest in a particular country (or region), as well as a thematic or comparative focus that will allow the student to demonstrate a capacity to think and work beyond Europe’s boundaries. Before applying to UVA, you should contact a prospective advisor to inquire about the possibility of graduate study with that person. Be aware that professors take leaves of absence from time to time. It is not a good idea to come here only to discover that your anticipated advisor is not available.

You should raise the issue of language fluency with your prospective advisor(s), since your language capacity and training need to be closely coordinated with your prospective research field. Students must pass a mastery-level language exam in their primary research language before taking comprehensive exams, and they are expected to pass a second, proficiency-level language exam before the conclusion of their third year of study. Students planning to work on modern continental Europe ought to have a knowledge of one relevant language at the time of their application that will enable them to pass a mastery-level exam in that language during their first semester. Students typically undertake additional language training during the summers and are eligible to apply to the department for financial support to do so.

Students in modern European history prepare three comprehensive exam fields. These are to be negotiated with the examining professors and crafted with the student’s program in mind. For example, one recent examinee prepared a Near Eastfield as well as Russia up to 1917 and Europe 1815 to the present. The traditional comprehensive field in European history has a clear spatio-temporal focus, covering, over a defined period, the general history of a particular country or region or of Europe as a whole. However, we strongly encourage students to consider giving their third field a thematic focus (e.g., history of ideas/theory of history, economic history), and/or a comparative and transnational focus. If demonstrably relevant to the proposed dissertation topic, focused study in another discipline would not be excluded.

Faculty: Alon Confino (Modern Germany, Holocaust, and Europe; historical method and narrative; memory and cultural history; transnational history of forced migration in the modern world, with an emphasis on the 1940s and in particular on Palestine/Israel); Robert Geraci (Modern Russia and Russian Empire; history of nationality, ethnicity, and race; history of imperialism; history of commerce)William Hitchcock (Modern Europe; War and Society; Cold War); Erik Linstrum (Modern Britain, British Empire, and the World; Science and Technology; European Cultural and Intellectual); James Loeffler (Jewish history; European history; international history; human rights history); Allan Megill (Modern Europe; Modern European History of Ideas; Historical Theory/Philosophy of History); Jeffrey Rossman (Russia/USSR; Modern Europe; Communism; Genocide); Stephen Schuker (Modern Europe, International); Mark Thomas (British Economic; US Business and Economic; International Economic; Australia).

Graduate Students: Mary BartonLeia BoudetTom ButcherZachary HoffmanHamutal JackobsonLauren Marshall

Science, Technology, and the Environment

Ph.D. students in this program may work with professors in the Department of History as well as with professors with joint appointments in History and the School of Engineering, which has a program in Science, Technology, and Society. Together with their advisor, students craft a program of coursework  around three distinct fields that meet the needs of their particular research projects. For example, a student interested in the history of American science might take courses on American history and the history of science in the Department of History as well as courses in the history of technology in the program in Science, Technology, and Society in the School of Engineering. The three fields might be Nineteenth-century U.S. History, Twentieth-century U.S. History, and the History of Science. There is no mandatory foreign language requirement for students in the program in the History of Science, Technology, and the Environment.  Advisors and students will agree upon a plan for language study suited to the student’s research needs. With permission, mastery of a specialized technical or scientific vocabulary has been substituted in place of a more traditional foreign language. 

More information is available here

Faculty: Brian H. Balogh (History of Technology and Public Policy, History of Environment and Public Policy); John K. Brown (Technological and Industrial History); W. Bernard Carlson (History of Technology); Christian McMillen (Native American; U.S. West); Sarah Milov (20th Century U.S., Political Economy, Science and Social Science in American Culture); Karen V. H. Parshall (History of Science, History of Mathematics).

Graduate Students: Shane LinAndrew McGeeJustin McBrien.

South Asia

One of the first programs to train historians of South Asia in the United States, the Corcoran Department of History has produced some of the leading historians in the country today. [click here for a list of alumni] 

Students of South Asia are expected to enter the doctoral program with a well-defined idea of their proposed field of study. This will be located in both space (region / locality) and time (chronology). We also encourage work that is comparative, trans-regional, as well as transnational. Professor Richard Barnett will supervise dissertations in medieval and early modern South Asian history, and Professor Neeti Nair in modern South Asian history. By the first semester of their third year, all students are expected to have completed coursework and taken qualifying exams in early modern and modern South Asian history, apart from one other field. This third field could be thematic, such as the study of nationalisms or legal history, or geographical, such as South Asia’s ties with East Asia or the Middle East. We encourage students to be creative and unconventional in the way they design their coursework, encouraging coursework with other faculty in the department (such as Alon Confino and Xiaoyuan Liu) as well as in allied departments (such as Mrinalini Chakravorty in English, Mehr Farooqi in South Asian Studies, and Daniel Ehnbom in Art History).

Students in the program are expected to use fluently one foreign language for their dissertation. We expect students to have completed at least two years of foreign language study before they arrive in Charlottesville, so that they may start advanced foreign language coursework while here; Hindi, Urdu, Persian, Sanskrit, Arabic, and Tibetan are some of the relevant languages that are taught at the university.

Apart from having access to Alderman library, one of the finest libraries for South Asia in the country, students will also belong to the South Asia Center, an inter-disciplinary home to all those engaged in the teaching and research of South Asia at UVa, and the Asia Institute. Visiting lecturers and diplomats, international conferences, in-house faculty seminars, and workshops organized by students and faculty also provide for intellectual interaction.

Faculty: Richard Barnett (Medieval and Early Modern South Asia; Pakistan, Afghanistan, Bangladesh); Neeti Nair (Modern South Asia; History of Education; History of Law). 

Graduate Students: Swati Chawla.

Twentieth-Century United States

Ph.D students concentrating in 20th-century American history can find a rich selection of both potential advisors and graduate seminars. Well represented in the department are the fields of American Cultural History, American Political Development, African American History, Southern History, Environmental History, Labor History, Legal History, the History of Political Economy, the History of Science and Technology, and the History of Foreign Relations. Recent graduate course offerings have included: “20th-Century American Constitutional History,” “The Origins of the Cold War,” “African American Historiography,” “The South Since 1900,” and “American Political Development In Action,” among others. In addition to colloquia with their peers, students take guided reading courses with individual professors to home in on more narrow research interests.  Courses taken in the first two years help frame 1) the master’s essay 2) comprehensive exam fields and 3) the dissertation prospectus.  Proficiency in language may be required, at the discretion of the candidate’s dissertation advisor. Current dissertation projects spanning the history of cryptography to the cultural history of Second-Wave Feminism illustrate the many kinds of specializations available to incoming students.  Candidates in 20th-century America also come together at the Miller Center for Public Affairs, the Carter G. Woodson Institute for African American Studies, the Law’s School Program on Legal and Constitutional History, the Institute for Advanced Studies in Culture, and assorted student-organized reading groups.

Faculty: Brian Balogh (20th Century U.S. Political; American Political Development; Environmental History; History of Science and Technology); Bernie Carlson (History of Entrepreneurship; History of Technology); Risa Goluboff (Civil Rights; Constitutional History; Constitutional Law); Grace Hale (Cultural History; History of the US South; Documentary Studies, Sound Studies); Claudrena Harold (African-American History; African American Studies; U.S. Labor History); Andrew Kahrl (African American; 20th Century US; Environmental); Melvyn Leffler (History of U.S. Foreign Relations); Christian McMillen (History of American Indians; Legal History; History of Global Disease; Western History); Sarah Milov (Political Economy, History of Science); Philip Zelikow (History of U.S. Foreign Relations; History of national security policy; history of political economy); Olivier Zunz (Social and Political History).

Graduate Students: Jon CohenBenjamin DavisonJoseph ThompsonMeaghan BeadleGillet RosenblithKathleen BerggrenBenji CohenErik ErlandsonAlexandra EvansStephanie FreemanJustin McBrienLeif FredricksonShane LinAndrew McGeeShannon Nix

US South

For more than half a century, UVA has been a global leader in the study of the US South. Ph.D. students in this area benefit from access to outstanding scholars across departments and a wealth of resources, including archival collections, in this vibrant field. Southern historians today are researching a staggering variety of interrelated themes, including the changing nature and meaning of “southern distinctiveness"; the political economy of the region--from the plantation system to modern labor regimes; the shifting race, gender and class relations among southerners; sectionalism and the causes of the Civil War; the rise and demise of the Confederacy; Reconstruction and the “New South”; racial oppression and violence; the creation of segregation; the cultural and economic interdependence of black and white southerners; the Civil Rights Movement and its aftermath; regional, national and global visions of southern culture, from popular music to cooking to the South's portrayal by Hollywood; the history of the South's built and "natural" environments, and the global (and globalizing) South. 

Clearly, this field has an interdisciplinary bent, and our faculty members emphasize the use of novels, films, music, photographs, and artifacts of material culture as historical documents.  We also collaborate with colleagues in other departments, including English, art history, music, religious studies, architectural history, media studies, and the law school.  Students have the opportunity to participate in one of the departments’ longest running workshops, the Southern Seminar, which meets regularly to workshop faculty members’ and graduate students’ research, hear visiting speakers, and discuss recent publications in the field.  Southern history students are also encouraged to participate in the Early American Seminar, Civil War Studies Group, and the American Studies Workshop, as these seminars intersect with their interests.  Students are encouraged to take US history seminars with the Southern history graduate faculty, and also to sample the wide array of undergraduate courses on Southern history (these can be taken for graduate school credit, with permission) and graduate courses in other departments.

History Department faculty working in this area include Gary GallagherElizabeth VaronGrace Hale (joint appointed in American Studies); Claudrena Harold (joint appointed in the Woodson Center for African and African American Studies); Justene HillSarah Milov; Andrew Karhl (joint appointed in the Woodson Center for African and African American Studies); Max EdelsonAlan Taylor.

UVA faculty across grounds working on the US South include Anna Brickhouse (English and American Studies); Jennifer Greeson (English and American Studies); Stephen Railton (English); Lisa Woolfork (English); Karl Miller (Music); Bonnie Gordon (Music); Richard Will (Music); Maurie McInnis (Art History); Louis Nelson (Architectural History); Jack Hamilton (Media Studies and American Studies); Aniko Bodroghkozy (Media Studies);  Doug Blackmon (Miller Center); Risa Goloboff (UVA Law School); Cynthia Nicoletti (UVA Law School);  Sabrina Pendergrass (Sociology and the Woodson Center for African and African American Studies); Charles Marsh (Religious Studies); Matt Hedstrom (American Studies and Religious Studies).

Graduate Students: Jon CohenBenjamin Davison; Emily SenefeldJoseph Thompson.

 

Corcoran Department of History
University of Virginia
Nau Hall - South Lawn
Charlottesville, VA 22904

  

Contact:
(434) 924-7147
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