Zunz, Olivier

American History Since 1865

HIUS
2002
Undergraduate
Spring
2018

This course is an interpretive survey of American History covering the fourteen decades since the end of the Civil War.  The main topics are the creation of a huge capitalist market economy, the ascent of the U.S. to world power and engagement in world affairs, and the many challenges of keeping a mass society democratic.  There are two lectures and a discussion section each week.  While a textbook supplies background, documents and iconography selected from primary sources emphasize the diversity of this nation’s past and highlight conflicting viewpoints.  The heart of the class is the students’ engagement with the documents and iconography, in light of the lectures, and active participation in weekly discussions.

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
60
Course Type: 
Discussion Sections: 
3

Seminar in United States History

Exploring American Democracy with Alexis de Tocqueville as Guide
HIUS
4501
Undergraduate
Spring
2018

Alexis de Tocqueville, who visited the United States in 1831-32, wrote the famous two-volume Democracy in America (1835, 1840) still avidly read today.  With this book, Tocqueville contributed to the idea of America with such brilliance that he helped Americans define themselves.  The young French aristocrat was the most influential theorist of the United States as a society built on voluntary associations.  We will engage the American context in which Tocqueville's thoughts evolved and explore Tocqueville's critical reflections on civil society, liberty, equality, and their relevance for our own lives. His seminal book will be our starting point to write seminar papers on American democracy.   

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
12
Course Type: 

Introductory Seminar in U.S. History

Giving in America
HIUS
1501
Undergraduate
Fall
2017

As practiced in the United States, philanthropy is a critical means for enlarging democracy and for engaging a very broad portion of the citizenry in important ideas and big decisions.  American philanthropy—whether originating in established foundations or grassroots organizations, large fortunes or modest gifts—shapes the ways we become active citizens, acquire knowledge, solve problems, govern our country, and project our image abroad.  For these reasons, philanthropic and nonprofit institutions in the United States have been highly visible actors in education, science, social services, the environment, the arts, and public policy.  In this course, students will study a part of American history rarely discussed in history books or classes and yet highly present in their daily lives.  

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
12
Course Type: 

The Emergence of Modern America, 1870-1930

HIUS
3131
Undergraduate
Fall
2017

The United States changed drastically from a society attached to local forms of life to a society dominated by national institutions, big business, and big government in the period covered in this course.  Throughout the course, we will investigate the ways in which Americans have attempted to keep their modern mass society democratic while negotiating the conflicts of region, faith, class, race and gender.  Among the topics studied in some detail are the rise of corporate America, the simultaneous creation of the regulatory state, the organization of modern knowledge, the creation of the first military-industrial complex of World War I, and the requirements of a consumer culture.  We will focus also on the landscape of large urban and industrial hinterlands in the making of modern America.  

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
30
Course Type: 

American History Since 1865

HIUS
2002
Undergraduate
Spring
2017

This course is an interpretive survey of American History covering the fourteen decades since the end of the Civil War.  The main topics are the creation of a huge capitalist market economy, the ascent of the U.S. to world power and engagement in world affairs, and the domestic challenge of keeping a mass society democratic. 

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
60
Course Type: 
Discussion Sections: 
3

The Emergence of Modern America, c. 1870-1930

HIUS
3131
Undergraduate
Fall
2016

The United States changed drastically from a society attached to local forms of life to a society dominated by national institutions, big business, and big government in the period covered in this course.  Throughout the course, we will investigate the ways in which Americans have attempted to keep their modern mass society democratic while negotiating the conflicts of region, faith, class, race and gender.  Among the topics studied in some detail are the rise of corporate America, the simultaneous creation of the regulatory state, the organization of modern knowledge, the creation of the first military-industrial complex of World War I, and the requirements of a consumer culture.  We will focus also on the landscape of large urban and industrial hinterlands in the making of modern America.  

Course Instructor: 

Introductory Seminar in U.S. History

Giving in America
HIUS
1501
Undergraduate
Fall
2016

As practiced in the United States, philanthropy is a critical means for enlarging democracy and for engaging a very broad portion of the citizenry in important ideas and big decisions.  American philanthropy shapes the ways we become active citizens, acquire knowledge, solve problems, govern our country, and project our image abroad.  For these reasons, philanthropic and nonprofit institutions in the United States have been highly visible actors in education, science, social services, the environment, the arts, and public policy.  When all the sources of funds are accounted for, the annual philanthropic budget equals that of the Pentagon.  In this course, students will study a part of American history rarely discussed in history books or classes and yet present their daily lives.  

Course Instructor: 

Exploring American Democracy, with Alexis de Tocqueville as Guide

HIUS
4501
Undergraduate
Spring
2016

Alexis de Tocqueville has contributed to the idea of America with such brilliance that he has helped Americans define themselves.  Despite his own ambivalence toward the individualistic trends he observed during his American journey of the 1830s, the young French aristocrat became one of the first theoreticians of the United States as a society built on voluntary associations.  By reading Democracy in America (1835, 1840), we will engage the American and European contexts in which Tocqueville's thoughts evolved and were received on both sides of the Atlantic. We will discuss Tocqueville's conceptualization of civil society and reflection on liberty and equality, and their relevance for our own lives.  We will use Tocqueville’s classic text (and other sources allavailable in English) as starting points to write seminar papers on American democracy. 

Course Instructor: 
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Corcoran Department of History
University of Virginia
Nau Hall - South Lawn
Charlottesville, VA 22904

  

Contact:
(434) 924-7147
(434) 924-7891
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