Zhang, Cong Ellen

History of Chinese Civilization

HIEA
2011
Undergraduate
Fall
2018

This course surveys China’s long history from the earliest written records to the end of the 20th century. The first half of the semester focuses on the evolution of the country’s intellectual traditions, imperial institutions, and key cultural and religious beliefs and practices. We will also examine how the successive governments of the late imperial times dealt with the strains of a changing society and economy. The second half of the course will consider how China met the challenges of the 19th and 20th centuries, characterized by Western and Japanese colonialism and frequent, large-scale rebellions. We will conclude the class by discussing the government and society of the People’s Republic against the background of these challenges. Required reading for the class includes Patricia Ebrey’s The Cambridge Illustrated History of China and Chinese Civilization: A Sourcebook and selected articles and book chapters. Final grades for the class will be based on mini-quizzes, exams, and one term paper. This course fulfills the College’s historical and non-Western perspective requirements. No previous knowledge of Chinese history is required.

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
32
Course Type: 

Introductory Seminar in East Asian History

Thought & Relig Imperial China
HIEA
1501
Undergraduate
Fall
2018

This is a discussion- and writing-intensive course. Through an introduction of scholarly works and primary source materials, this course explores the most prominent figures, ideas, and forces that shaped the intellectual life and religious beliefs in Chinese history. Major topics include early Chinese worldview, the “Hundred Schools of Thought,” and popular beliefs and practices. Another goal of this class is to introduce students to the historian’s craft of research and writing. Class discussion, presentations, and a variety of written assignments all gear toward developing students’ critical thinking, reading, and writing skills. Reading assignments include Philip J. Ivanhoe and Bryan W. Van Norden, Readings in Classical Chinese Philosophy (Hackett Publishing, 2005), Bryan W. Van Norden, Introduction to Classical Chinese Philosophy (Hackett Publishing, 2011,), and selected articles and book chapters. This course fulfills the College’s second writing and historical and non-Western perspective requirements. No previous knowledge of Chinese history is required.

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
15
Course Type: 

Introductory Seminar in East Asian History

Cul & Society: Imperial China
HIEA
1501
Undergraduate
Spring
2018

What was life like for the Chinese a thousand years ago? How did individuals and families distinguish themselves in society? Was there a major division between the religious life of the upper and lower classes? How did ordinary people deal with the mundane aspects of everyday life? This course answers the above questions and more through an exploration of one of the most dynamic periods in Chinese history: the Song Dynasty (960-1279). Throughout the semester, we will read works by modern scholars as well a variety of primary sources, including anecdotal writing, legal cases, and precepts for social life. The main topics of the course include philosophical and religious traditions, elite culture, gender and family relations, popular beliefs and practices, and the everyday life of ordinary people. This course fulfills the College’s second writing and historical and Western perspective requirements. No previous knowledge of Chinese history is required.

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
15
Course Type: 

China to the Tenth Century

HIEA
3111
Undergraduate
Spring
2018

This class introduces Chinese history from its origins through the end of the 10th century. Its goal is to explore what makes Chinese civilization specifically Chinese and how the set of values, practices, and institutions we associate with Chinese society came to exist. Political, social, cultural, and intellectual history will all be covered, though not equally for all periods. Major themes of the course include intellectual developments, empire-building efforts, religious and popular beliefs, and Chinese interaction with other cultures and peoples. Required reading includes a variety of primary sources, book chapters, and articles. Final grades will be based on four quizzes, two short papers, and class participation. This course fulfills the College’s non-Western and historical perspective requirements. No previous knowledge of Chinese history is required.

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
40
Course Type: 

History of Chinese Civilization

HIEA
2011
Undergraduate
Fall
2017

This is an introductory course to Chinese history. The first half of the class deals with the formation of the country’s intellectual traditions, efforts of empire-building, and the characteristic orientation of Chinese society to family, locality, and education. We will also look at how the successive government of late imperial China dealt with the strains of a growing and changing society. The second half of the course will consider how China met and mastered the challenges of the 19th century, and what the particular challenges of the 20th century were. We will conclude the class by discussing the government and society of the People’s Republic of China against the background of these challenges. Required reading for the class includes Patricia Ebrey’s China: A Cultural, Social, and Political History, Chinese Civilization: A Sourcebook, and selected articles and book chapters. Final grades for the class will be based on mini-quizzes, exams, and one term paper. This course fulfills the College’s historical and non-Western perspective requirements. No previous knowledge of Chinese history is required.

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
40
Course Type: 

Introductory Seminar in East Asian History

Thought & Relig Imperial China
HIEA
1501
Undergraduate
Fall
2017

This is a discussion- and writing-intensive course. Through an introduction of scholarly works and primary source materials commonly used by historians of China, this course explores the most prominent figures, ideas, and forces that shaped the intellectual thinking and religious beliefs in Chinese history. Major topics include early Chinese worldview, the “Hundred Schools of Thought,” and popular beliefs and practices. Another goal of this class is to introduce students to the historian’s craft of research and writing. Class discussion, presentations, and a variety of written assignments all gear toward developing students’ critical thinking, reading, and writing skills. Reading assignments include Philip J. Ivanhoe and Bryan W. Van Norden, Readings in Classical Chinese Philosophy (Hackett Publishing, 2005), Bryan W. Van Norden, Introduction to Classical Chinese Philosophy (Hackett Publishing, 2011,), and selected articles and book chapters. This course fulfills the College’s second writing and historical and non-Western perspective requirements. No previous knowledge of Chinese history is required.

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
15
Course Type: 

China to the Tenth Century

HIEA
3111
Undergraduate
Spring
2017

This class introduces Chinese history from the beginning through the end of the 10th century. Its goal is to explore what makes Chinese civilization specifically Chinese and how the set of values, practices, and institutions we associate with Chinese culture and society came to exist. Political, social, cultural, and intellectual history will all be treated, though not equally for all periods. Major themes of the course include intellectual developments, empire-building efforts, religious and popular beliefs, and Chinese interaction with other cultures and peoples. Required reading includes a variety of primary sources, book chapters, and articles. Final grades will be based on four quizzes, a term paper, class participation, and a take-home final. No prior knowledge of Chinese history is required. This course fulfills the College’s non-Western and historical perspective requirements.

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
40
Course Type: 

Introductory Seminar in East Asian History

Cul & Society: Imperial China
HIEA
1501
Undergraduate
Spring
2017

How did ordinary people live their lives in imperial China? What were the ethical demands on men and women of the elite class and the general populace? To what an extent did urban and rural culture differ? How were ideal family relationships and important rites of passage, such as weddings and funerals, articulated and conducted? Who did people turn to when conflicts arose? What was the relationship between local government and local society? This course seeks to answer the above questions and many more through an introduction of scholarly work and a variety of primary sources commonly used by historians of China, ranging from epitaphs to ritual manuals and from legal cases to anecdotal writing. Requirements for the class include active participation in class discussion, a presentation, and four 5-page papers. Assigned reading includes selections from Brian Mcknight and James Liu, The Enlightened Judgements, Jacques Gernet, Daily Life in China on the Eve of the Mongol Invasion, Patricia Ebrey, Inner Quarters: Marriage and the Lives of Chinese Women in the Sung Period, Hong Mai, Record of the Listener, and etc. No prior knowledge of Chinese history is required. This course fulfills the College’s second writing, non-Western, and historical perspective requirements

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
15
Course Type: 

Thought and Religious Life in Imperial China

HIEA
1501
Undergraduate
Fall
2016

This discussion-oriented class will explore the ideas and practices that shaped the political, intellectual, and religious life in early Chinese history.  Major topics include early Chinese worldview, the philosophies of the "Hundred Schools," ideas of kingship and government, and institutional and popular religions.  Required reading includes Readings in Classical Chinese Philosophy, edited by Philip J. Ivanhoe and Bryan W. Van Norde, Introduction to Classical Chinese Philosophy by Bryan Van Norden, and book chapters and articles.  Final grades for the class will be based on a presentation, papers of different lengths, and class participation.  No prior knowledge of Chinese history is required.  This course fulfills the College's second writing and non-Western and historical perspective requirements. 

Course Instructor: 

History of Chinese Civilization

HIEA
2011
Undergraduate
Fall
2016

This is an introductory course to Chinese history.  The first half of the class deals with the formation of the country's intellectual traditions, empire-building processes, and the characteristic orientation of Chinese society to family, locality, and education.  We will also look at how the successive government of late imperial China dealt with the strains of growing population and a fast changing society.  The second half of the course will consider how China met and mastered the challenges of the 19th and the 20th centuries.  We will conclude the class by discussing the government and society of the People's Republic of China against the background of these challenges.  Required readings for the class includes Patricia Ebrey, China:  A Cultural, Social, and Political History and Chinese Civilization: A Sourcebook and book chapters and articles.    Final Grades for the class will be based on short response papers, quizzes, a term paper, and a final exam.  No prior knowledge of Chinese history is required.  This course fulfills the College's second writing and non-Western and historical perspective requirements. 

Course Instructor: 

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Corcoran Department of History
University of Virginia
Nau Hall - South Lawn
Charlottesville, VA 22904

  

Contact:
(434) 924-7147
(434) 924-7891
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