Zelikow, Philip

America and War Since 1900

HIUS
2052
Undergraduate
Fall
2017

This is a survey of modern American military history, but in the modern era it is more than that.  Since 1900, war has reshaped the way America is governed.  It has shaped industry and innovation.  It has spawned a vast intelligence establishment with military capabilities of its own.  The experience of war and narratives about it have colored popular culture in every generation for more than a hundred years.  

The course will concentrate on the major episodes and, for each, address four basic questions.  Why did the United States go to war?  How did the United States choose to wage war?  Why did the war turn out the way it did?  What impact did the war have?

This course is also a kind of sequel to HIUS 2051, Gary Gallagher's fine course on "U.S. Military History, 1600 to 1900."

This is a lecture course with discussion sections.  Class size will be limited to 60 students.  There will be a midterm and a final exam.

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
120
Course Type: 
Discussion Sections: 
6

The Modern World: Global History since 1760

HIST
2002
Undergraduate
Fall
2017

This is a survey of modern world history for students, beginning or advanced, who wish to understand how the world got to be the way it is today. In order to understand modern history, a global perspective is essential. This is true whether you are interested in economics, warfare, philosophy, politics, or even pop culture.

This course can be essential for students in many fields.  It is one of the four core required courses for students who are pursuing the interdisciplinary major in Global Studies in any of its tracks. 

This course is a broad survey. Therefore it is classified as a 2000-level course with no prerequisites. That does not mean it is easier than more tightly focused courses offered at the 3000 or 4000-level. You will have to juggle many different narratives and topics.

Class size is relatively small.  The course blends both video presentations from the instructor (on the Coursera platform) and then review and further discussion of the course material, including the readings, with the instructor in class.  Grades are determined by performance on weekly online quizzes, in-class reading quizzes, class participation, and two exams.

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
60
Course Type: 

Introductory Seminar in History

Liberalism: Theory and Practice
HIST
1501
Undergraduate
Spring
2017

 

Although most Americans think “liberalism” is an old-fashioned name for leftwing ideology, the rest of the world (and scholars) use the term in its classical meaning, as a set of ideas for organizing society and political life, oriented around ideals of liberty.  This set of ideas was a profound turning point in the development of the modern world in the late 1700s and early 1800s.  Mutations of liberalism, enemies of liberalism – these are the themes of political life recurring across the last two centuries of global history.

This is a course that follows liberalism, in theory and practice, over those last two centuries, in various parts of the world.  It is a story of rise, fall, renewal, and new challenges.  Now, in the early part of the 21st century, the future of ‘liberalism’ is the great political issue of this generation.

Students will be graded on class participation and on two papers (one due on March 14 and the other due on May 1).

Required readings

History is a subject mainly learned through lots of reading. And this course covers a lot of ground.

Edmund Fawcett, Liberalism: The Life of an Idea (Princeton: Princeton University Press,

2014) (paperback)

R.R. Palmer, The Age of the Democratic Revolution: The Challenge (Princeton: Princeton

University Press, 1959)  Note that this volume, "The Challenge," is volume one of two.  (The second volume, "The Struggle," is not required.) Although published in paperback for decades, this book is expensive. Fortunately, you should be available to find less expensive used copies available, including through Amazon.

Domingo Faustino Sarmiento, Facundo: Civilization and Barbarism, trans. Kathleen

Ross (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2003)

Jan-Werner Müller, What Is Populism? (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press,

2016)

 

 

 

 

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
15
Course Type: 

New Course in General History

Reasoning from History
HIST
3559
Fall
2016

Much of what passes for common sense involves historical reasoning - inference from experience.  Much of what passes for social science also involves historical reasoning.  Futures are projected on the basis of supposed patterns or trends in the past. 

In fact, trying to state what actually happened in the past - even to you, yesterday, let alone to long ago wages and prices, social conditions, or "the balance of power" - is extraordinarily tricky business.  Some of the most intricate debates among philosophers concern questions of how to define, evaluate, compare, or explain historical facts.

This course reviews some common traps in historical reasoning and suggests ways of avoiding them.  It also deals with the reality that beliefs about history are often among the most powerful and tenacious beliefs shaping public debates - and that those beliefs are often conveyed more through pictures than through words.  The course is thus designed to strengthen ability to analyze both particulars and contexts. 

Most, but by no means all, reading deal with the United States.  The conceptual issues are universal.  

Grades will be based on short papers, an excercise, class participation, and a take-home final exam.  Since a presidential election occurs during 2016, we will use post-election transitions into governance as our equivalent of a laboratory experiment.  

Grduate students from any School or department may enroll in the class, taking it under a graduate-level listing with some different requirements.  

Required readings will include various book excerpts and articles; required books include Richard Neustadt & Ernest May, Thinking in Time: The Uses of History for Decisionmakers; Hal Brands & Jeremi Suri, eds., The Power of the Past: History and Statecraft; and John Lewis Gaddis, The Landscape of History:  How Historians Map the Past.

Course Instructor: 

America and War since 1900

HIUS
2052
Undergraduate
Fall
2016

This is a survey of modern American military history, but in the modern era it is more than that.  Since 1900, war has reshaped the way America is governed.  It has shaped industry and innovation.  It has spawned a vast intelligence establishment with military capabilities of its own.  The experience of war and narratives about it have colored popular culture in every generation for more than a hundred years.  

The course will concentrate on the major episodes and, for each, address four basic questions.  Why did the United States go to war?  How did the United States choose to wage war?  Why did the war turn out the way it did?  What impact did the war have?

This course is also a kind of sequel to HIUS 2051, Gary Gallagher's fine course on "U.S. Military History, 1600 to 1900."

This is a lecture course with discussion sections.  Class size will be limited to 60 students.  There will be a midterm and a final exam.

Required readings include book excerpts and articles, especially for some of the recent conflicts.  The following books will be required:  David Kennedy, Over Here:  The First Wold War and American Society; Samuel Hynes, The Soldiers' Tale:  Bearing Witness to Modern War; David Kennedy, The American People in World War II; Graham Allison & Philip Zelikow, Essence of Decision: Explaining the Cuban Missile Crisis; and Ronald Spector, After Tet:  The Bloodiest Year in Vietnam.

Course Instructor: 

Reasoning from History

HIST
3559
Undergraduate
Spring
2016
Much of what passes for common sense involves historical reasoning – inference from experience.  Much of what passes for social science also involves historical reasoning.  Futures are projected on the basis of supposed patterns or trends in the past.
 
In fact, trying to state what actually happened in the past – even to you, yesterday, let alone to long ago wages and prices, social conditions, or “the balance of power” – is extraordinarily tricky business.  Some of the most intricate debates among philosophers concern questions of how to define, evaluate, compare, or explain historical facts.
 
This course reviews some common traps in historical reasoning and suggests ways of avoiding them.  It also deals with the reality that beliefs about history are often among the most powerful and tenacious beliefs shaping public debates – and that those beliefs are often conveyed more through pictures than through words.  The course is thus designed to strengthen ability to analyze both particulars and contexts.
 
Most, but by no means all, reading deal with the United States.  The conceptual issues are universal. 
 
Grades will be based on short papers, an exercise, class participation, and a take-home final exam.  Since a presidential election occurs during 2016, we will use post-election transitions into governance as our equivalent of a laboratory experiment.
 
Graduate students from any School or department may enroll in the class, taking it under a graduate-level listing and with some different requirements.
 
Required readings will include various book excerpts and articles; required books include Richard Neustadt & Ernest May, Thinking in Time: The Uses of History for Decisionmakers; and Margaret MacMillan, Dangerous Games: The Uses and Abuses of History.
Course Instructor: 

The Modern World: Global History Since 1760

HIST
2002
Undergraduate
Fall
2015

This is a survey of modern world history for students, beginning or advanced, who wish to understand how the world got to be the way it is today. In order to understand modern history, a global perspective is essential. This is true whether you are interested in economics, warfare, philosophy, politics, or even pop culture.

This course can be essential for students in many fields.  It is one of the four core required courses for students who are pursuing the interdisciplinary major in Global Studies in any of its tracks. 

This course is a broad survey. Therefore it is classified as a 2000-level course with no prerequisites. That does not mean it is easier than more tightly focused courses offered at the 3000 or 4000-level. You will have to juggle many different narratives and topics.

Class size is relatively small.  The course blends both video presentations from the instructor (on the Coursera platform) and then review and further discussion of the course material, including the readings, with the instructor in class.  Grades are determined by performance on weekly online quizzes, in-class reading quizzes, class participation, and two exams. 

Required readings include Jeffry Frieden, Global Capitalism: Its Fall and Rise in the Twentieth Century; significant excerpts from R.R. Palmer, The Age of the Democratic Revolution: The Challenge; and Odd Arne Westad, Restless Empire: China and the World Since 1750.  Most of the readings are articles, chapters, or book excerpts that will be in a History 2002 Sourcebook.

Course Instructor: 

New Course in History

"The Uses of History"
HIST
5559
Undergraduate
Graduate
Fall
2015

Historical reasoning, using analogies and references to the past, may be the most common form of human reasoning.  This course studies several kinds of historical reasoning, illustrating common strengths and weaknesses, especially when such reasoning is used for decisionmaking in public life.  

The course can thus introduce graduate and select advanced undergraduate students to different historical approaches, a few issues in the philosophy of history, and the close relation of such reasoning to the way questions are answered in fields like economics, law, and public policy.  Throughout the emphasis is to help students reflect upon and improve the quality of their thought in practical situations.

The course is an adaptation of one I taught at Harvard during most of the 1990s, where I co-taught it with my late colleagues Ernest May and Richard Neustadt.  There it was usually taught at the graduate level, though in a venue (Harvard’s Kennedy School) also open to students from the professional schools.  This is the first time it has been offered at Virginia.   

Class size is limited and the course will be taught as a mixture of lecture and discussion.  Grades will be based mainly on several short papers and on class participation.  Required texts will include Richard Neustadt & Ernest May, Thinking in Time: The Uses of History for Decision-Makers and a variety of case studies, book excerpts, and articles.

Course Instructor: 
Subscribe to Zelikow, Philip

Corcoran Department of History
University of Virginia
Nau Hall - South Lawn
Charlottesville, VA 22904

  

Contact:
(434) 924-7147
(434) 924-7891
M-F 8am to 4:30pm
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