Varon, Elizabeth R.

The Coming of the Civil War

HIUS
3071
Undergraduate
Fall
2017

Through a close examination of the interrelationships among economic change, cultural and political developments, and the escalating sectional conflict between 1815 and 1861, this lecture course seeks to explain what the caused the outbreak of the American Civil War in April 1861. Students should note that this period also encompasses the Jacksonian era of American history, and most of the lectures in the first half of the course will be devoted to examining it, with a focus on party politics and debates over slavery. Grades will be based on class participation and on three written assignments: a midterm exam; an 8-10 page term paper; and a comprehensive, take-home final examination.

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
120
Course Type: 
Discussion Sections: 
6

Topics in United States Gender History

HIUS
7621
Graduate
Fall
2017

This colloquium will survey foundational and cutting-edge scholarship on the social construction of femininity and masculinity in U.S. history, from the colonial era to 1900.

We will explore how gender conventions take shape, and how they are perpetuated and contested.  Our readings represent a wide range of topics and methods:  they reconsider key events in women’s history such as the Salem witch trials and Seneca Falls convention; historicize such concepts as patriarchy, home, work, public and private; illustrate how gender history has enriched traditional fields such as political and military history; and place American gender conventions in a transnational and comparative perspective.

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
15
Course Type: 

Rise and Fall of the Slave South

HIUS
3231
Undergraduate
Spring
2017

This course will explore the history of the American South from the colonial period to 1900.  The central theme is the changing nature and meaning of “southern distinctiveness.”  We will focus on the origins of slavery and the plantation system; the shifting race, gender and class relations among Southerners; sectionalism and the causes of the Civil War; the rise and demise of the Confederacy; Reconstruction and the “New South”; and on social and ideological divisions within the region. We will read a wide range of primary sources including political speeches, slave narratives, newspapers, diaries, letters and memoirs.

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
60
Course Type: 
Discussion Sections: 
3

Seminar in United States History

Gender Hist. of Civil War Era
HIUS
4501
Undergraduate
Spring
2017

This seminar examines the construction and contestation of gender roles—definitions of womanhood and manhood—during the Civil War era (from the 1830s through the 1870s). We will explore how the gender conventions of the North and South diverged during the antebellum era, and assess how that divergence shaped sectional tensions; re-envision the Civil War as a crisis over gender roles, in which men and women in each section struggled to fulfill—and at times openly rebelled against—the prevailing definitions of women’s sacrifice and of manly heroism; and reveal the gendered dimensions of slave resistance, emancipation and the contest over citizenship during Reconstruction. The course aims to furnish you with the tools to craft an article-length (25 page) research paper, by semester’s end. Students will identify topics, pertaining to our course themes, in consultation with the instructor; in the last four weeks of the course, we will focus on the research and writing process.

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
12
Course Type: 

The Coming of the Civil War

HIUS
3071
Fall
2016

Through a close examination of the interrelationships among economic change, cultural and political developments, and the escalating sectional conflict between 1815 and 1861, this lecture course seeks to explain what caused the outbreak of the American Civil War in April 1861.  Students should note that this period also encompasses the Jacksonian era of American history, and most of the lectures in the first half of the course will be devoted to examining it, with a focus on party politics and debates over slavery.  Grades will be based on class participation and on three written assignments: a midterm exam; an 8 - 10 page term paper; and a comprehensive, take-home final examination.

Course Instructor: 

19th Century American Social and Cultural History

HIUS
7658
Graduate
Fall
2016

This readings course surveys modern classics and cutting-edge historiography on the nineteenth century in the United States (especially the period 1830 to 1877), with an emphasis on how social and cultural histories have both promoted inclusiveness and trained our attention on conflict, contingency, experience, identity and language.  We will read one monograph per week, supplemented by an occasional article and book review.  The main written assignment is an historiographical essay of 20 - 25 pages on a topic related to your research interests.  The reading list will be expressly designed to help students with comprehensive exam preparation in US fields. 

Course Instructor: 

Seminar in United States History:

"Gender History of the Civil War Era"
HIUS
4501
Undergraduate
Spring
2016

This seminar examines the construction and contestation of gender roles—definitions of womanhood and manhood—during the Civil War era (from the 1830s through the 1870s). We will explore how the gender conventions of the North and South diverged during the antebellum era, and assess how that divergence shaped sectional tensions; re-envision the Civil War as a crisis over gender roles, in which men and women in each section struggled to fulfill—and at times openly rebelled against—the prevailing definitions of women’s sacrifice and of manly heroism; and reveal the gendered dimensions of slave resistance, emancipation and the contest over citizenship during Reconstruction. The course aims to furnish you with the tools to craft an article-length (25 page) research paper, by semester’s end. Students will identify topics, pertaining to our course themes, in consultation with the instructor; in the last four weeks of the course, we will focus on the research and writing process.

Course Instructor: 

The Rise and Fall of the Slave South

HIUS
3231
Undergraduate
Spring
2016

This course will explore the history of the American South from the colonial period to 1900.  The central theme is the changing nature and meaning of “southern distinctiveness.”  We will focus on the origins of slavery and the plantation system; the shifting race, gender and class relations among Southerners; sectionalism and the causes of the Civil War; the rise and demise of the Confederacy; Reconstruction and the “New South”; and on social and ideological divisions within the region. We will read a wide range of primary sources including political speeches, slave narratives, newspapers, diaries, letters and memoirs.

Course Instructor: 

Topics in United States Gender History

HIUS
7621
Graduate
Fall
2015

This colloquium will survey foundational and cutting-edge scholarship on the social construction of femininity and masculinity in U.S. history, from the colonial era to 1900.

We will explore how gender conventions take shape, and how they are perpetuated and contested.  Our readings represent a wide range of topics and methods:  they reconsider key events in women’s history such as the Salem witch trials and Seneca Falls convention; historicize such concepts as patriarchy, home, work, public and private; illustrate how gender history has enriched traditional fields such as political and military history; and place American gender conventions in a transnational and comparative perspective.

Course Instructor: 
Subscribe to Varon, Elizabeth R.

Corcoran Department of History
University of Virginia
Nau Hall - South Lawn
Charlottesville, VA 22904

  

Contact:
(434) 924-7147
(434) 924-7891
M-F 8am to 4:30pm
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