Thomas, Mark

American Business

HIUS
3411
Undergraduate
Spring
2018

This course examines the history of the American business enterprise from the workshop to the multinational corporation.  We will explore the economic, legal and political factors that have helped to shape the business organization.  Specific topics to be addressed include:  relations between government and business; law and the rise of Big Business; the changing role of the entrepreneur; the developments of 'scientific management'; the reputation of businessmen as corporations expanded; the factors behind the rise of the multinational corporation; the importance of the individual(e.g Whitney, Ford, Sloan, Rockefeller, Carnegie, DuPont, etc) in developing business practices.

Students may find it to their advantage to have some background in American economic history (HIUS 2006) or economics; there are however, no prerequisites.  

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
120
Course Type: 

American Economic History

HIUS
2061
Undergraduate
Fall
2017

This course concentrates on critical aspects of the history of American economic development.  The issues covered include the nature and consequences of the colonial relationship to Great Britain, the political economy of the Constitution, the economics of slavery, the rise of the modern bureaucratic corporation, causes of the Great Depression, and the political economy of contemporary America.  In addressing these issues, the course considers more general questions of what forces‑‑cultural, economic, legal, etc.--shape the pace and pattern of economic development in any society.

The required text for this course is:

     Gary Walton and Hugh Rockoff, Economic History of the United States.

This will be supplemented by a course packet of readings.  Readings will average c. 100 pages a week.

There will be two one-hour exams and a final.

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
120
Course Type: 

The British Economy Since 1850

HIEU
5352
Spring
2017

This course will examine the economic history of Britain from 1850 to present.  Topics will include the relative decline of Britain in the late 19th century, the impact of the World Wars on British economic performance, the origins and impact of the Great Depression, and the economic consequences of Mrs. Thatcher. 

Undergraduates may also take this class for 4501 credit after prior discussion with the instructor.

 

 

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
10
Course Type: 

American Business

HIUS
3411
Undergraduate
Spring
2017

This course examines the history of the American business enterprise from the workshop to the multinational corporation.  We will explore the economic, legal and political factors that have helped to shape the business organization.  Specific topics to be addressed include:  relations between government and business; law and the rise of Big Business; the changing role of the entrepreneur; the developments of 'scientific management'; the reputation of businessmen as corporations expanded; the factors behind the rise of the multinational corporation; the importance of the individual(e.g Whitney, Ford, Sloan, Rockefeller, Carnegie, DuPont, etc) in developing business practices.

Students may find it to their advantage to have some background in American economic history (HIUS 2006) or economics; there are however, no prerequisites.  

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
120
Course Type: 

American Economic History

HIUS
2061
Undergraduate
Fall
2016

This course concentrates on critical aspects of the history of American economic development.  The issues covered include the nature and consequences of the colonial relationship to Great Britain, the political economy of the Constitution, the economics of slavery, the rise of the modern bureaucratic corporation, causes of the Great Depression, and the political economy of contemporary America.  In addressing these issues, the course considers more general questions of what forces‑‑cultural, economic, legal, etc.--shape the pace and pattern of economic development in any society.

The required text for this course is:

     Gary Walton and Hugh Rockoff, Economic History of the United States.

This will be supplemented by a course packet of readings.  Readings will average c. 100 pages a week.

There will be two one-hour exams and a final.

Course Instructor: 

Economic History

HIST
7051
Graduate
Fall
2015

A graduate seminar covering topics in international economic history since 1870.  Topics will include globalization, 1870-1913, the great depression, the economics of world war, and economic reconstruction and recovery after 1945.

Course Instructor: 
Subscribe to Thomas, Mark

Corcoran Department of History
University of Virginia
Nau Hall - South Lawn
Charlottesville, VA 22904

  

Contact:
(434) 924-7147
(434) 924-7891
M-F 8am to 4:30pm
Department Contacts