Schuker, Stephen A.

European History: Industrial Revolution to the Welfare State 1848-1963

HIEU
3442
Undergraduate
Fall
2017

Surveys the Continent's troubled history from the Victorian Age to the welfare state. After examining the demographic, agricultural, industrial and "industrious" revolutions and other features of nineteenth-century modernization, the course addresses the growth of liberalism and nationalism, various forms of imperialism, the, causes and consequences of both world wars, Communist and Fascist challenges, Weimar and Nazi Germany, the Great Depression and the accompanying crisis of capitalism, the Holocaust and the decline of old Europe, and Social Democratic transformation.  Requires one extended book review-essay and a final.

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
30
Course Type: 

Major Seminar

The Second World War
HIST
4501
Undergraduate
Fall
2017

The course meets in seminar form.  After common discussion of seven major themes in the war, each student will research and write an original essay of ca. 25 pages on some aspect of the war.  Students will have the broadest possible choice of topics geographically and thematically. This course fulfills the second writing requirement.

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
12
Course Type: 

Colloquium in Post-1700 European History

Era of the World Wars, 1914-1945
HIEU
4512
Undergraduate
Spring
2017

A study of the major countries of Europe in the era of the  two world wars (1914-1945), with special attention to international relations, and political, economic, and social developments.  The course will emphasize Germany, France, and England, but can accommodate other interests as well.  Most suitable for third- and fourth- year students with some background in modern history as well as graduate students.  There will be weekly meetings to discuss readings, but no final exam.  One student will lead off discussion each week.  Students signing up for HIEU 5312 will in most cases write a bibliographical paper covering their readings during the term.  Students seeking credit for  HIEU 4501 and needing to satisfy the second writing requirement will have to produce three short papers on subjects of their choice.

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
6
Course Type: 

Era of the World Wars, 1914-1945

HIEU
5312
Graduate
Spring
2017

A study of the major countries of Europe in the era of the  two world wars (1914-1945), with special attention to international relations, and political, economic, and social developments.  The course will emphasize Germany, France, and England, but can accommodate other interests as well.  Most suitable for third- and fourth- year students with some background in modern history as well as graduate students.  There will be weekly meetings to discuss readings, but no final exam.  One student will lead off discussion each week.  Students signing up for HIEU 5312 will in most cases write a bibliographical paper covering their readings during the term.  Students seeking credit for  HIEU 4501 and needing to satisfy the second writing requirement will have to produce three short papers on subjects of their choice.

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
6
Course Type: 

Evolution of the International System, 1815-1950

HIEU
3752
Undergraduate
Spring
2017

Analyzes the evolution of great-power politics as well as internal economic relations from the post-Napoleonic Congress of Vienna and the systems of Metternich and Bismarck to the great convulsions of the twentieth century and the Russo-American Cold War after World War II.  

Includes two weekly lectures with occasional discussion plus weekly reading. Requires one eight-page paper comparing two scholarly books read during the term and one final examination  consisting mostly of essays with some short answers.  For students who wish to sit for a voluntary take-home midterm, the instructor will offer one.

 

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
40
Course Type: 

European History, 1890-1954

HIEU
3442
Fall
2016

Surveys Continent's troubled history from the Victorian Age to the welfare state. Addresses features of modernization and industrialization, nationalism and imperialism, causes and consequences of both world wars, Communist and Fascist challenges, Weimar and Nazi Germany, the Great Depression and crisis of capitalism, the Holocaust and decline of old Europe, and Social Democratic transformation.

Course Instructor: 

Major Seminar

The Second World War
HIST
4501
Fall
2016

This major seminar is a small class (not more than 15 students) intended primarily but not exclusively for history majors who have completed two or more courses relevant to the topic of the seminar.  The work of the seminar results primarily in the preparation of a substantial (ca 25pp. in standard format) research paper.  Some restrictions and prerequisites apply to enrollment.  See a history advisor or the director of undergraduate studies.  

Course Instructor: 

Colloquium on Europe since 1890

HIEU
5892
Undergraduate
Graduate
Spring
2016
A discussion course on key topics in the transnational history of Modern Europe since 1890. A capstone for majors in the field, it is also open to others. Topics include old and new ways of doing history, Imperialism, World War I, postwar capitalism and its critics, Communism and Fascism, the Great Depression, the Holocaust, the Cold War, the path toward European Union, the Welfare State, German Reunification, and the end of the Cold War.
(Tu 3:30-6:00pm)
Course Instructor: 

Evolution of the International System from Napoleon to the Cold War (1815-1963)

HIEU
3752
Undergraduate
Spring
2016
This course traces the evolution of the international system from the Napoleonic era through the first stages of the Cold War.  It emphasizes the domestic roots of international behavior and will pay due attention to industrial developments, economic and financial constraints, and the changing nature of warfare, as well as to formal diplomatic structure.  We will focus on the principal European countries during the nineteenth century when they played the leading role in maintaining the balance of power.  We will direct increasing attention to the United States, Japan, China, and other extra-European powers as they began to figure importantly in diplomatic outcomes as the twentieth century proceeded.
 
The class meets for two seventy-five minute lectures per week (TR 11:00-12:15). There are two formal written requirements – a paper and a final examination.
 
Students in HIEU 3752 will be asked to write a short but polished review essay (seven to eight pages double-spaced) on some major topic covered during the term.  They should base the essay on two substantial scholarly books with either contrasting or complementary interpretations.  Scholarly books rest on documented original research.  Popular treatments or textbooks provide no substitute for them.  An extensive supplementary list of readings will be placed on the Collab website in order to help students find appropriate books on the subject of their choice.  You are not, however, limited to books on the supplementary list or even to the topics covered by the supplementary list.  Note that the readings on the required list may not be used.  The Times Literary Supplement and the New York Review of Books publish review essays that serve as exemplars of the genre desired.  You should spend from one-third to one-half of your space setting out the authors’ theses and the balance of the paper advancing your own interpretation or synthesis.  Before handing in their papers, students should consult the latest edition of the Chicago Manual of Style (available on the Alderman Library website) and follow the rules specified in that volume for capitalization, spelling, footnotes, and bibliography.  
Course Instructor: 
Subscribe to Schuker, Stephen A.

Corcoran Department of History
University of Virginia
Nau Hall - South Lawn
Charlottesville, VA 22904

  

Contact:
(434) 924-7147
(434) 924-7891
M-F 8am to 4:30pm
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