Mobley, Christina

Colloquium in African History

Soccer in the Global South
HIAF
4511
Undergraduate
Fall
2017

This course explores the history of soccer  to understand how and why it has become the most popular sport in the world. We will examine the development of the game, the institutions that have grown up around it (FIFA), and the economic and political impact of the sport from roughly the late 19th century to present. We will also use football as a lens to study the politics of race, gender, migration, globalization, and corruption.  This course coincides with renowned soccer historian Laurent Dubois being in residence at the IHGC and with a workshop entitled "Global South Soccer Politics" that will take place in the fall. Students will be expected to participated in the workshop, where they will get a chance to present their work to experts in the field.

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
12
Course Type: 

Colloquium in African History

Africa in the Global South
HIAF
5559
Graduate
Spring
2017

This colloquium will offer an introduction to the themes, regions, and debates surrounding Africa and the Global South. Topics include the idea of Africa, the place of the African diaspora, and challenges facing post-colonial African states, the causes of economic underdevelopment and political violence, and discourses of "Africa Rising" and Afro-pessimism. This course is interdisciplinary and will be taught in the Global South Humanities Laboratory. The seminar is discussion based, focusing on weekly readings. Students will produce a final paper or project. This course satisfies the undergraduate major Capstone seminar requirement.

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
6
Course Type: 

Colloquium in African History

Africa and the Global South
HIAF
4511
Undergraduate
Spring
2017

This colloquium will offer an introduction to the themes, regions, and debates surrounding Africa and the Global South. Topics include the idea of Africa, the place of the African diaspora, and challenges facing post-colonial African states, the causes of economic underdevelopment and political violence, and discourses of "Africa Rising" and Afro-pessimism. This course is interdisciplinary and will be taught in the Global South Humanities Laboratory. The seminar is discussion based, focusing on weekly readings. Students will produce a final paper or project. This course satisfies the undergraduate major Capstone seminar requirement.

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
6
Course Type: 

Atlantic World

HIST
4511
Undergraduate
Fall
2016

This course introduces undergraduate students in all fields to the history of the Atlantic world from roughly the fifteenth through the nineteenth century. The course will explore questions of historical interpretation as well as method and theory. It is designed to challenge students’ assumptions about the traditional construction of the Atlantic world and undermine teleological and top-down narratives about nation states and empires.

Course Instructor: 
Course Type: 

Atlantic World

HIST
5559
Graduate
Fall
2016

This course introduces graduate students in all fields to the history of the Atlantic world from roughly the fifteenth through the nineteenth century.  The course will explore questions of historical interpretation as well as method and theory.  It is designed to challenge students' assumptions about the traditional construction of the Atlantic world and undermine theological and top-down narratives about nation states and empires.  Graduate students in other departments will find the seminar a useful addition to their primary academic fields.  Motivated undergraduate students are welcome to join the seminar with permission of the professor.  ABD's and those writing research papers are welcome to participate in the colloquium as a paper-writing workshop.  Other students will produce a literature review on a topic of their own choosing.  

Course Instructor: 

Early African History through the Era of the Slave Trade

HIAF
2001
Undergraduate
Fall
2016

            HIAF 2001 is an introductory course to the history of Africa from roughly the dawn of history until the end of the Trans-Atlantic slave trade. Over sixteen weeks we will proceed chronologically by region, learning about the great diversity of peoples, cultures, and climates that inhabit the African continent. In this course we will learn that Africa was never the “dark continent” that it is often supposed to be. A major focus of the course will be Africa’s engagement with the outside world, including the trans-Saharan trade, Swahili city-states and the Indian Ocean, and Trans-Atlantic trade. We will see how Africans have always been important historical actors in world history, exploring how they interacted with their neighbors in ways that made sense to them and their communities.

            Course material will be presented through interactive lectures and in-class discussion as well as in depth examination of primary and secondary historical courses, art and material culture. Evaluation will be based on class participation and a series of take-home writing assignments geared towards helping students develop their critical thinking, reading, and writing faculties. No prior knowledge of African history is required.

Course Instructor: 
Subscribe to Mobley, Christina

Corcoran Department of History
University of Virginia
Nau Hall - South Lawn
Charlottesville, VA 22904

  

Contact:
(434) 924-7147
(434) 924-7891
M-F 8am to 4:30pm
Department Contacts