Meyer, Elizabeth A.

Greece in the Fifth Century

HIEU
5021
Graduate
Fall
2017

Prerequisite:  HIEU 2031, HIEU 3559 (Hellenistic) or equivalent; or instructor permission.

This course examines the political, military, and social history of Greece from the end of the Persian Wars (479 BC) to the end of the Peloponnesian War (404 BC).  This is the age of the creation of Athenian democracy and Athenian Empire, as well as of the growing tensions with Sparta that eventually resulted in the Peloponnesian War.  Understanding these developments is crucial to understanding all Greek history.  This class will proceed by discussion, including discussion of four five-page papers written by each student (due variously throughout the term) distributed before the class in which they will be discussed.  There will also be two-three exercises (on working with ancient evidence) and a final exam. 

Undergraduates are permitted to take this class as a graduate class or for 4511 credit.

Reading is substantial, averaging approximately 200 pages/week, and will be drawn from the following:

 

The Landmark Thucydides (R. Strassler, ed.; Free Press)

Plutarch, Greek Lives (Oxford World Classics)

J. M. Moore, Aristotle and Xenophon on Democracy and Oligarchy (California)

Diodorus of Sicily, Library of History vols. 4-5 (Loeb/Harvard)

Xenophon, Hellenica (Penguin)

C. Fornara, Archaic Times to the End of the Peloponnesian War (Cambridge)

and readings on the Collab course website

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
6
Course Type: 

Colloquium in Pre-1700 European History

Greece in the 5th Century
HIEU
4511
Fall
2017

Prerequisite:  HIEU 2031, HIEU 3559 (Hellenistic) or equivalent; or instructor permission.

This course examines the political, military, and social history of Greece from the end of the Persian Wars (479 BC) to the end of the Peloponnesian War (404 BC).  This is the age of the creation of Athenian democracy and Athenian Empire, as well as of the growing tensions with Sparta that eventually resulted in the Peloponnesian War.  Understanding these developments is crucial to understanding all Greek history.  This class will proceed by discussion, including discussion of four five-page papers written by each student (due variously throughout the term) distributed before the class in which they will be discussed.  There will also be two-three exercises (on working with ancient evidence) and a final exam. 

Undergraduates are permitted to take this class as a graduate class or for 4511 credit.

Reading is substantial, averaging approximately 200 pages/week, and will be drawn from the following:

 

The Landmark Thucydides (R. Strassler, ed.; Free Press)

Plutarch, Greek Lives (Oxford World Classics)

J. M. Moore, Aristotle and Xenophon on Democracy and Oligarchy (California)

Diodorus of Sicily, Library of History vols. 4-5 (Loeb/Harvard)

Xenophon, Hellenica (Penguin)

C. Fornara, Archaic Times to the End of the Peloponnesian War (Cambridge)

and readings on the Collab course website

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
6
Course Type: 

Ancient Greece

HIEU
2031
Undergraduate
Fall
2017

History of Ancient Greece from the Homeric period to the death of Alexander the Great. Development of the city-state, Athenian democracy, and the nature of Greek politics; the conflict between Greece and Persia, and between Sparta and the Athenian naval empire; consequences of the latter conflict--the Peloponnesian War--for subsequent Greek history; finally, the Macedonian conquest of Greece and Persia.

Lecture and weekly discussions; midterm, final, seven-page paper, and occasional quizzes in section. Readings will average between 100 and 125 pages a week, to be taken from the following (students are not responsible--for exam purposes--for the entirety of any of these, although they will have to read all of either Herodotus or Thucydides for the paper):

     The Landmark Herodotus (R. Strassler, ed.; Free Press)

     The Landmark Thucydides (R. Strassler, ed.; Free Press)

     Plutarch, Greek Lives (Oxford)

     Plato, The Apology of Socrates (Hackett)

     J. M. Moore, Aristotle and Xenophon on Democracy and Oligarchy (California)

     S. Pomeroy et al., Ancient Greece (textbook:  edition to be determined)

     a xerox packet (available at NK Print and Design on Elliewood Avenue)

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
120
Course Type: 
Discussion Sections: 
6

Roman Imperialism

HIEU
5061
Graduate
Spring
2017

(Prerequisite:  HIEU 2041, HIEU 3021, HIEU 3041, or instructor permission)

How and why did the Romans come to dominate the known world by 140 BC?  This course explores the relations between the martial tenor of Roman society, the army, war aims, and diplomacy and internal politics.  Was the Roman empire assembled intentionally or unintentionally?  Did the Romans of the Middle Republic have a foreign policy, or a strategic sense, at all?  A discussion seminar open to graduate students and advanced undergraduates.  Readings average 200 pages per week; one seven-to-ten-page paper, one ten-to-fifteen-page paper, one brief oral report, and a final. 

Undergraduates may also take this class for 4501 credit after prior discussion with the instructor.

Readings will be drawn from Livy, Polybius, and Plutarch; a selection of modern scholars, including W. Harris and A. Eckstein; and readings on Collab.

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
15
Course Type: 

Roman Republic and Empire

HIEU
2041
Undergraduate
Spring
2017

A survey of the political, social, and institutional growth of the Roman Republic, with close attention given to its downfall and replacement by an imperial form of government; and the subsequent history of that imperial form of government, and of social and economic life in the Roman Empire, up to its own decline and fall.  Readings of ca. 120 pages per week; midterm, final, and one seven-page paper.

Readings will be drawn from the following:

            Sinnegan and Boak, A History of Rome (text)

            Livy, The Early History of Rome

            Plutarch, Makers of Rome

            Suetonius, The Twelve Caesars

            Tacitus, Annals of Imperial Rome

            Apuleius, The Golden Ass

            R. MacMullen, Roman Social Relations

            and a course packet

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
60
Course Type: 
Discussion Sections: 
3

Dark Age Greece

HIEU
5001
Graduate
Fall
2016

The rise of Greek civilization through the seventh century B.C..  This discussion seminar will stress an interdisciplinary approach to the fragmented study of early Greek history, and use archaeological evidence as well as more traditional literacy sources to examine fundamental topics like the rise of the polish; the development of the idea of citizenship; the beginnings of coinage (and the questions of how to define value); the importance of purported changes in warfare; writing, literacy, and law-givers; the values of activities of the aristocracy (and how these can be identified and defined); colonizations; and the development of sanctuaries.  We will read a mix of primary sources and secondary monographs (an established survey, either O. Murray's Early Greece or Jonathan Hall's A History of the Archaic Greek World; F. de Polignac, Cults, Territories, and the Origins of the Greek City-States; V. Hanson, The Other Greeks; I. Morris, Archeology as Cultural History, among others); some of the work of the course will be reports on the ever-burgeoning scholarship in this field.  Requirements will include:  two oral reports, one on an historical monograph and one on an archeological site;  one exercise on evidence; one shorter paper analyzing a scholarly controversy; and one longer paper analyzing approaches to the 'rise of the polis' question.  Reading will average 250 pages per week.

Course Instructor: 

The Fall of the Roman Republic

HIEU
3041
Undergraduate
Fall
2016

This upper-level lecture class assumes a basic knowledge of Roman history but has no prerequisites.  It will cover the most tumultuous period in Roman history, that which stretches from 133 BC to the establishment of Octavian (Augustus) as the first emperor in 27 BC.  This was the age of the great generals (Marius, Sulla, Pompey, Caesar); of great oratory (Cicero), of amazing changes in the city of Rome itself, in Italy, and in the ever-growing provinces; an age of shifting political alliances, howling crowds, and the eventual transformation of a Republic into a monarch.  How did this come about?  Could the Republic maintain an empire, or was the dominance of one man unavoidable?  We will read mostly primary sources in translation, averaging about 146 pages per week; there will be ten in-class discussions, a mid-term, a final, one 5-6 page pager, and one 7-10 page paper.  Reading will be drawn from:

  • H.H. Scullard, From the Gracchi to Nero (fifth edition, 1982)
  • Plutarch, Makers of Rome and The Fall of the Roman Republic (Pengiun)
  • Sallust, Jugurthine War and Conspiracy of Catiline (Pengiun, transl. Woodman, 2007)
  • Julius Caesar, Civil Wars and Gallic War (Oxford)
  • M. Tullius Cicero, On Government and Selected Political Speeches (Pengiun) 
  • and a course packet

 

Course Instructor: 

The Roman Empire

HIEU
5051
Undergraduate
Graduate
Spring
2016
Prerequisites for undergraduates:  HIEU 2041 OR HIEU 3041; or instructor permission
 
This course will examine the Principate from its founding (27 B.C.) to the beginning of the third-century crisis (A.D. 235).  It will proceed by an examination of themes and topics rather than as a narrative:  these themes and topics will include emperor and administration, local municipalities, slavery and varying gradations of freed status and citizenship, patronage, social mobility, economy, romanization, the courts, emperor-cult, and resistance to Rome.  Students are expected to write five exercises based on ancient sources; to write one five-to-seven-page paper; and to take a final exam.  Readings will be drawn from the following:
            C. Wells, The Roman Empire
            Tacitus, Annals and Histories
            Josephus, Jewish War
            Pliny, Letters
            Apuleius, Apology
            M. Goodman, The Ruling Class of Judaea.  The Origins of the Jewish Revolt Against Rome A.D. 66-70 (Cambridge U. P., 1987)
            R. MacMullen, Paganism in the Roman Empire (Yale)
            R. MacMullen, Romanization in the Time of Augustus (Yale)
            S. Price, Rituals and Power.  The Roman Imperial Cult in Asia Minor (Cambridge U.P., 1984)
and additional readings on Collab
Course Instructor: 

Roman Republic and Empire

HIEU
2041
Undergraduate
Spring
2016
A survey of the political, social, and institutional growth of the Roman Republic, with close attention given to its downfall and replacement by an imperial form of government; and the subsequent history of that imperial form of government, and of social and economic life in the Roman Empire, up to its own decline and fall.  Readings of ca. 120 pages per week; midterm, final, and one seven-page paper.
Readings will be drawn from the following:
            Sinnegan and Boak, A History of Rome (text)
            Livy, The Early History of Rome
            Plutarch, Makers of Rome
            Suetonius, The Twelve Caesars
            Tacitus, Annals of Imperial Rome
            Apuleius, The Golden Ass
            R. MacMullen, Roman Social Relations
            and a course packet
Course Instructor: 

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Corcoran Department of History
University of Virginia
Nau Hall - South Lawn
Charlottesville, VA 22904

  

Contact:
(434) 924-7147
(434) 924-7891
M-F 8am to 4:30pm
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