McMillen, Christian W.

Major Seminar

Water, Development and Global History, 1850-Present
HIST
4501
Undergraduate
Spring
2018

Water is our most essential resource. Without it, of course, there is no life. Depending on where in the world one lives water can be abundant or it can be scarce. But no matter where one looks there is a history of human interactions with water—world history, environmental history, legal history and more.  We will explore some of that history.  Topics for readings and papers may include, among others: indigenous water rights; the historical origins of uneven access to clean water around the world; the discovery of water borne diseases in the 19th century; the damming of rivers for irrigation and power; the emergence of the multi-billion dollar bottled water industry; climate change and water; the unequal impact of flooding on rich and poor; and health and water. We will explore many kinds of materials: primary and secondary historical texts; photographs; films; and more.

 

Students will write a 20-30 page paper based on primary sources. 

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
15
Course Type: 

American Indian History

HIUS
3641
Undergraduate
Spring
2018

Beginning with the post-Ice Age migrations to the Americas and Native American origin stories, and ending with current developments in tribal sovereignty, this course will introduce students to deep history of Native North America.  Using archeological and anthropological sources, the course will begin with a detailed exploration of the pre-contact world, covering such issues as resource use, trade, diplomacy, and migrations.  The course will then move to the era of contact with Europeans, with particular emphasis on relations with the Spanish, French, and English.  Topics such as disease, diplomacy, intercultural communication, slavery, and trade, among others, will be covered.  By the end of the 17th Century Native America was an entirely different place.  The remainder of the course will explore, over three centuries, the consequences of contact. Using primary and secondary sources, we will cover such topics as mutually beneficial trade and diplomatic relations between Natives and newcomers; the politics of empire; U.S. expansion; treaties and land dispossession; ecological, demographic, and social change; pan-Indian movements; legal and political activism; and many, many others. Students will write 4 papers between varying in length from 4-8 pages. There are no exams. 

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
40
Course Type: 
Discussion Sections: 
3

Introductory Seminar in History

Water
HIST
1501
Undergraduate
Spring
2017

Water is our most essential resource. Without it, of course, there is no life. Depending on where in the world one lives water can be abundant or it can be scarce. But no matter where one looks there is a history of human interactions with water—world history, environmental history, legal history and more.  We will explore some of that history.  Topics will include, among others: indigenous water rights; the historical origins of uneven access to clean water around the world; the discovery of water borne diseases in the 19th century; the damming of rivers for irrigation and power; and the emergence of the multi-billion dollar bottled water industry. We will explore many kinds of materials: primary and secondary historical texts; photographs; films; and more. The class will a mixture of lecture and discussion. In addition to readings in common, students will conduct their own independent research.     

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
15
Course Type: 

Epidemics, Pandemics, and History

HIST
2210
Undergraduate
Fall
2016

There is perhaps no longer lasting historical relationship than that between humans and disease, especially that of epidemic disease.  The relationship predates agriculture, the formation of cities, and, if current research on the emergence of diseases like tuberculosis is correct, human migration out of Africa.  From the earliest times to the present, epidemics have affected human history in a myriad of ways:  demographically, culturally, politically, financially, and biologically.  Humans have never known a time in history when epidemics did not loom large.  This is true today as it ever was.  This course will span a great deal of time and space - from the emergence of the earliest known diseases through HIV/AIDS.  The course will be a mixture of lecture and discussion. 

Course Instructor: 

Distinguished Majors Program Special Seminar

HIST
4990
Undergraduate
Fall
2015

This is a year-long course of directed research and writing for the fourth-year thesis.  It is open only to participants in the departmental program for Distinguished Majors.  For information on the program, contact the director of the Distinguished Majors Program, Mr. Christian McMillen by e-mail at cwm6w@virginia.edu.

Course Instructor: 
Subscribe to McMillen, Christian W.

Corcoran Department of History
University of Virginia
Nau Hall - South Lawn
Charlottesville, VA 22904

  

Contact:
(434) 924-7147
(434) 924-7891
M-F 8am to 4:30pm
Department Contacts