Lendon, J. E.

Seminar in Pre-1700 European History

Late Antiquity, AD 235-410
HIEU
4501
Undergraduate
Fall
2016

This new class, a discussion seminar, examines the great Roman crisis of the third century and the Roman's response to it, as well as the nature of reestablished Roman rule through the fourth century AD.  This is the great of the emperors Diocletian and Constantine, of Julian and Theodosius.  Topics to be examined include governance, warfare, the late-antique economy, religious strife, the life of cities, similarities and differences between East and West, and more general assessments of different aspects of late-antique culture.  The major work of the course will be a twenty-five page research paper, along with two oral reports (one on the research underway), as well as continued high-quality contribution to discussion.  Readings will be mainly drawn from primary sources in translation.  This class will be co-listed with HIEU 5559.

Course Instructor: 

Ancient Greece

HIEU
2031
Undergraduate
Fall
2016

History of Ancient Greece from the Homeric period to the death of Alexander the Great.  Development of the city-state, Athenian democracy, and the nature of Greek politics; the conflict between Greece and Persia, and between Sparta and the Athenian naval empire; consequences of the latter conflict--the Peloponnesian War--for subsequent Greek history; finally, the Macedonian conquest of Greece and Persia.

Lecture and weekly discussions; midterm, final, seven-page paper, and occasional quizzes in section.  Readings will average between 100 and 125 pages a week, to be taken from the following (students are not responsible--for exam purposes--for the entirety of any of these, although they will have to read all of either Herodotus or Thucydides for the paper):

  • Herodotus, History
  • Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War
  • Plutarch, Greek Lives
  • Plato, The Apology of Socrates
  • Aristophanes, Three Comedies
  • J. M. Moore, Aristotle and Xenophon on Democracy and Oligarchy
  • Pomeroy, Burstein, Donlan, and Roberts, Ancient Greece
  • a xerox packet
Course Instructor: 

New Course in European History

Late Antiquity, AD 235-410
HIEU
5559
Graduate
Fall
2016

This new class, a discussion seminar, examines the great Roman crisis of the third century and the Roman's response to it, as well as the nature of reestablished Roman rule through the fourth century AD.  This is the great of the emperors Diocletian and Constantine, of Julian and Theodosius.  Topics to be examined include governance, warfare, the late-antique economy, religious strife, the life of cities, similarities and differences between East and West, and more general assessments of different aspects of late-antique culture.  The major work of the course will be a twenty-five page research paper, along with two oral reports (one on the research underway), as well as continued high-quality contribution to discussion.  Readings will be mainly drawn from primary sources in translation.  This class will be co-listed with HIEU 4501.

Course Instructor: 

Late Archaic Greece

HIEU
4511
Undergraduate
Graduate
Spring
2016
HIEU 2031 Ancient Greece (or equivalent) is strongly recommended as a prerequisite
 
This course examines the history of Greece in the late archaic age down to the end of the Persian wars (c. 650-479 BC).  The course will begin with consideration of Herodotus, our main source for this period, proceed through a set of topics on political, constitutional, social, cultural, and economic history, and end up with systematic reading and discussion of Herodotus’ account of the Persian Wars.  Neglected for the most part are religion, art and archaeology, and literature qua literature.   
 
This is an advanced course; it assumes familiarity with the general outlines of Greek History and institutions.  
 
Reading will average 250 pages/week.  Requirements will be substantial and include participation in discussion, oral reports, papers, and a final exam.  As is characteristic of 4511 seminars, the writing requirement is broken up into shorter papers:  here, the four required papers will be five-to-seven pages in length, and will each present and evaluate a scholarly controversy.  These will be circulated to the class in advance. The class fulfills the second writing requirement.
Course Instructor: 

Anthropology of Ancient Greece

HIEU
7013
Graduate
Fall
2015

A reading and discussion course tracing the abundant and profitable use made since the early 20th century of anthropological method in the study of ancient Greece.  Weekly readings (all in English, translated where necessary) usually mate a classic work of anthropology with a work on Greek religion, history, literature, or culture which makes use of the method presented in that work.   Among the readings by Classical scholars there is particular emphasis on the “Paris School” of Vernant, Detienne, and Vidal-Naquet. 

Topics include:

  • Evolutionism (Frazer with Jane Harrison on Greek religion)
  • Durkheim on religion (with Jane Harrison on Greek religion)
  • Gift-giving (Mauss and L. G. Mitchell on gift-giving in Greek interstate relations; van Wees)
  • Pollution (Douglas with Robert Parker on miasma)
  • Structuralism (Levi-Strauss with Detienne on Greek spices and religion; Vernant)
  • Structuralism and space (Levi-Strauss with Vidal-Naquet)
  • Social Drama (Turner with Barry Strauss on the conflict of generations during the Peloponnesian War)
  • Honor (Pitt-Rivers and Campbell with Gabriel Hermann and the controversy about violence over honor in Classical Athens)
  • Feud (Black-Michaud and D. Cohen on Athenian courts)

Requirements are reading and discussion, reports on works the rest of the class have not read, and a longer paper applying anthropological method to a topic of the student’s own choosing, which need not be classical (an excellent paper was once received applying Victor Turner’s Social Drama to the origins of the US Civil War).

Course Instructor: 
Subscribe to Lendon, J. E.

Corcoran Department of History
University of Virginia
Nau Hall - South Lawn
Charlottesville, VA 22904

  

Contact:
(434) 924-7147
(434) 924-7891
M-F 8am to 4:30pm
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