Klubock, Thomas

Colloquium in Latin American History

Environmental History of Latin America
HILA
4511
Undergraduate
Spring
2018

This class introduces students to both the field of environmental history and the environmental history of Latin America.  Topics include: the environments of the pre-Columbian Americas; the ecological impact of the European conquest of the Americas; the “Columbian exchange” of European diseases for Latin American goods (chocolate, tomatoes, corn, potatoes etc.); sugar, coffee, and slavery in Brazil and the Caribbean; the ecology and culture of bananas and banana plantations; forests and deforestation from the Amazon to Chile’s temperate rain forests; the ecology of oil and mining (and “extractive” economies more generally); conservation and national parks; and, the emergence of modern environmentalism.  Our goal throughout will be to analyze different approaches to writing environmental history and to answer a series of basic questions: What is the environment?  What is the historical relationship between human societies and nature?  What role has nature played in human history?  What is nature?  How do we write its history?  What sources do environmental historians use? Students will write a twenty-page historiographical essay on a topic related to the themes of the class and chosen in consultation with the instructor. 

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Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
12
Course Type: 

Seminar in Latin American History

Latin American and the US
HILA
4501
Undergraduate
Fall
2017

This research seminar examines the history of Latin America-U.S. relations.  The first half of the semester we will read a number of historical works.  The assigned texts are designed both to provide a broad overview of the history of Latin America-U.S. relations and introduce students to a variety of approaches to writing the history of what is often referred to as United States imperialism. The class will focus on a series of United States interventions in Latin America over the last two centuries, from the Mexican-American War, also known as the War of the U.S. Invasion in Mexico, to the occupation of Cuba, the CIA role in the overthrow of democratic governments in Guatemala (1954) and Chile (1973), and the US- sponsored counter-insurgencies in Central America during the 1980s.

 

            During the the second half of the semester, students will work on a twenty-page research paper based on research in original primary sources on a theme related to the course, developed in consultation with the professor.

The final grade will be composed of a grade for reading and participation in class discussions (50%) and a grade for the final paper (50%).

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
12
Course Type: 

Colloquium in Latin American History

Latin American Environmental History
HILA
4511
Undergraduate
Spring
2017

This colloquium introduces students to the growing literature in both environmental history and the environmental history of Latin America.  Topics that include: the environments of the pre-Columbian Americas; the ecological impact of the European conquest of the Americas; the “Columbian exchange” of European diseases for Latin American goods (chocolate, tomatoes, corn, potatoes etc.); sugar, coffee, and slavery in Brazil and the Caribbean; the ecology and culture of bananas and banana plantations; forests and deforestation from the Amazon to Chile’s temperate rain forests; the ecology of oil and mining (and “extractive” economies more generally); conservation and national parks; and, the emergence of modern environmentalism.  Our goal throughout will be to analyze different approaches to writing environmental history and to answer a series of basic questions: What is the environment?  What is the historical relationship between human societies and nature?  What role has nature played in human history?  What is nature?  How do we write its history?  What sources do environmental historians use?  Students will read approximately one historical monograph or an equivalent group of articles each week and  four 5-7 page essays during the course of the semester.  

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
12
Course Type: 

Modern Latin America

HILA
2002
Undergraduate
Spring
2017

This course examines modern Latin American history from independence to the present.  It focuses on socioeconomic and political changes and on the ways different social actors -peasants, indigenous groups, workers, and women - have confronted and contributed to these changes.  The course covers a number of periods: movements for independence and the early nineteenth century; Liberalism, export-led growth, and the formation of modern nation states;  the Mexican revolution; industrialization, urbanization, and populism; the United States and Cuban revolution; the 1960s, Liberation Theology, and social movements; the crisis of underdevelopment and military regimes; Central American revolutions; and Latin America in the new global order, neoliberal economic restructuring, and transitions to democracy.  The course will consider a number of key questions about the causes of underdevelopment, the roots of authoritarianism, the nature and causes of revolutionary movements, the questi  on of human rights, the problem of social injustice, United States intervention, and the role of the Catholic Church. 

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
120
Course Type: 
Discussion Sections: 
6

Colonial Latin America, 1500-1824

HILA
2001
Undergraduate
Fall
2016

This class is an introduction to the history of Latin America from the pre-conquest period to independence.  The class covers the societies and states of the Americas and the Iberian peninsula before 1492, the conquest of the Americas, the formation of the Spanish and Portuguese imperial systems, colonial societies and economies, the African slave trade and slavery in the Americas, the wars for independence, and the legacies of colonialism in Latin America.  Requirements for the class include two mid-term exams and one final exam.  Exams will be short-essay format.

Course Instructor: 

Modern Latin America

HILA
2002
Undergraduate
Spring
2016

This course examines modern Latin American history from independence to the present.  It focuses on socioeconomic and political changes and on the ways different social actors -peasants, indigenous groups, workers, and women - have confronted and contributed to these changes.  The course covers a number of periods: movements for independence and the early nineteenth century; Liberalism, export-led growth, and the formation of modern nation states;  the Mexican revolution; industrialization, urbanization, and populism; the United States and Cuban revolution; the 1960s, Liberation Theology, and social movements; the crisis of underdevelopment and military regimes; Central American revolutions; and Latin America in the new global order, neoliberal economic restructuring, and transitions to democracy.  The course will consider a number of key questions about the causes of underdevelopment, the roots of authoritarianism, the nature and causes of revolutionary movements, the questi  on of human rights, the problem of social injustice, United States intervention, and the role of the Catholic Church. 

Course Instructor: 

Seminar in Latin American History

"United States-Latin American Relations"
HILA
4501
Undergraduate
Fall
2015

This research seminar examines the history of Latin America-U.S. relations. We will ask basic questions about the logic of U.S. foreign policy in Latin America.  What drives U.S. foreign policy in the region? Moral, ethical, or religious concerns?  Economics?  National security imperatives?  Can U.S. actions in Latin America be understood as imperialism or "neocolonialism?"  What was the impact of the Cold War on Latin America?  What has been the impact of the more recent U.S.-led “drug wars?”  We will also ask questions related to social and cultural history, focusing on places of encounter between Latin Americans and North Americans, and the paths of migration that lead northward into cities, towns, and rural districts throughout the United States.   The second half of the semester students will write 20-page research papers based on original research in primary sources.

Course Instructor: 
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Corcoran Department of History
University of Virginia
Nau Hall - South Lawn
Charlottesville, VA 22904

  

Contact:
(434) 924-7147
(434) 924-7891
M-F 8am to 4:30pm
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