Kahrl, Andrew W.

From Redlines to Subprime: Race and Real Estate in the US

HIUS
3853
Undergraduate
Fall
2018

This course examines the relationship between race, real estate, wealth, and poverty in the United States, with an emphasis on the period from the New Deal to the present.  We will learn about the instrumental role homeownership and residential location has played in shaping the educational options; job prospects, living expenses, health, quality of life, and wealth accumulation of Americans in the twentieth century, and how race became--and remains --a key determinant in the distribution of the homeownership's benefits in American society.  We will study the structure and mechanics of the American real estate industry, the historical and contemporary dynamics of housing markets in urban and suburban America, and the impact of governmental policies and programs on the American economy and built environment.  We will look at how the promise of perils of homeownership has shaped ideas of race and belonging, and informed the political ideologies and material interests, of both white and black Americans.  We will learn how and why real estate ownership, investment, and development came to play a critical role in the formation and endurance of racial segregation, and in the making of modern American capitalism.  And we will explore how legal challenges and political mobilizations against racial exclusion and economic exploitation in housing markets came to shape the modern black freedom movement as a whole.  As we do, we will acquire a deeper knowledge and understanding of how real estate shapes our lives and lies at the heart of many of the most vexing problems and pressing challenges facing America today.  

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
15
Course Type: 

Race and Real Estate in the United States

HIUS
3853
Undergraduate
Fall
2016

This course examines the relationship between race, real estate, wealth, and poverty in the United States, with an emphasis on the period from the New Deal to the present.  We will learn about the instrumental role homeownership and residential location has played in shaping the educational options; job prospects, living expenses, health, quality of life, and wealth accumulation of Americans in the twentieth century, and how race became--and remains --a key determinant in the distribution of the homeownership's benefits in American society.  We will study the structure and mechanics of the American real estate industry, the historical and contemporary dynamics of housing markets in urban and suburban America, and the impact of governmental policies and programs on the American economy and built environment.  We will look at how the promise of perils of homeownership has shaped ideas of race and belonging, and informed the political ideologies and material interests, of both white and black Americans.  We will learn how and why real estate ownership, investment, and development came to play a critical role in the formation and endurance of racial segregation, and in the making of modern American capitalism.  And we will explore how legal challenges and political mobilizations against racial exclusion and economic exploitation in housing markets came to shape the modern black freedom movement as a whole.  As we do, we will acquire a deeper knowledge and understanding of how real estate shapes our lives and lies at the heart of many of the most vexing problems and pressing challenges facing America today.  

Course Instructor: 

Seminar in United States History

Race and Inequality in 20th Century America
HIUS
4501
Undergraduate
Fall
2016

This research seminar will examine the history of race as social category, racism as a set of interpersonal and institutional practices, and racial inequality in 20th century American life.  Students will study a range of scholarship and conduct research on a topic related to the course's theme, culminating in a final research paper.  

Course Instructor: 

African Americans and the City

HIUS
4501
Undergraduate
Spring
2016

In the first six decades of the twentieth century, over 6 million African Americans left the South in search of a better life in cities in the North.  This course will explore the urbanization of black America and its impact on American culture, politics, and society from the early twentieth century to the present.  We will learn how the urban experience shaped African Americans’ racial identities and struggles for equality.  We will look at how the massive demographic changes to American cities during this period also transformed the nation’s political and social geography, and how the black urban experience changed over time and in relation to larger changes in America’s political economy.  In examining the many facets of the black urban experience, we will pay close attention to: work, employment, and the struggle for economic opportunity; housing, real estate, and residential patterns; schools and education; music, the arts, and expressive culture; law enforcement and police-community relations; and movements for social, political, and economic justice.
 
Students will read approximately 200 pages each week, write review essays of assigned books, and complete a final research paper on a topic related to the course’s main theme.

Course Instructor: 

Land and Power in America

HIUS
1501
Undergraduate
Spring
2016

What does American history look like when viewed "from the ground up"?  In this first-year seminar, students will examine the dynamic role that land has played in the making of America, from the period of European settlement and conquest to the present.  We will explore how Americans have fought over land-as poverty, resource, and sovereign territory-and how the land has fought back.  We will learn how the quest to exploit natural resources, acquire and claim dominion over territory, design cities and suburbs, and plan the future has shaped American history.  As we do, we will also gain a greater understanding of the limits, contraindications, and ironic consequences of humans' struggle contain nature and claim control over land.  By treating the natural and build environment as a dynamic historical actor, this course offers students a new perspective on the study of history, in general, and American history, in particular.  As part of the course, each student will choose a research topic (in consultation with the instructor) and complete a final research paper. 

Course Instructor: 

New Course in United States History

"From Redlines to Subprime: Race and Real Estate in the United States"
HIUS
3559
Undergraduate
Fall
2015

This course examines the dynamic relationship between real estate, racial segregation, wealth, and poverty in American cities and suburbs, with an emphasis on the period from the New Deal to the present.  We will look at how the quest for homeownership in a capitalist society shaped ideas of race and belonging, influenced Americans’ political ideologies and material interests, and impacted movements for civil rights and economic justice.  Topics include: the formation of Federal housing policies and programs under the New Deal; real estate industry practices in the age of suburbanization and “white flight”; automobility, mass transit, and the politics of transportation; ghettoization, urban renewal, and public housing; property rights and taxpayers’ movements; homeowners’ associations, gated communities, and the rise of private governance; land development and black land loss in the modern South; the diversification of suburbs and gentrification of cities in recent decades; predatory lending and the Great Recession in urban minority communities. Students will learn to interpret a variety of primary sources, including land deeds and covenants, tax records, maps, financial statements, contracts, and industry trade publications, among others.  Class meetings will alternate between lectures, tutorials, and discussions of weekly reading assignments.  Students will complete 3 topical essays and a final research project.

Course Instructor: 

African American History, 1865-Present

HIUS
3652
Undergraduate
Fall
2015

This course examines the black experience in America from emancipation to the present.  We will study African Americans’ long struggle for freedom and equality, and learn about their contributions to and influence on America’s social, political, and economic development.  We will also study the history of race and racism, explore how its meaning and practice has changed over time, and how it shaped—and continues to shape—the lives of all persons in America.  Central to this course is the idea that African American history is American history, and that the American experience cannot be understood apart from the struggles and triumphs of African Americans.  Course topics include: emancipation and Reconstruction; the age of Jim Crow; the Great Migration and the New Negro; the civil rights and Black Power movements; mass incarceration; and struggles for justice and equality in the present.  In addition to readings from assigned books, students will analyze and interpret a variety of primary sources, including film, music, and visual art.  Class meetings will alternate between lectures and discussions.  Assignments will include a midterm, a final exam, two topical essays, and short responses to weekly readings.

Course Instructor: 
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Corcoran Department of History
University of Virginia
Nau Hall - South Lawn
Charlottesville, VA 22904

  

Contact:
(434) 924-7147
(434) 924-7891
M-F 8am to 4:30pm
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