Hill, Justene

New Course in United States History

African American Hist to 1877
HIUS
5559
Graduate
Fall
2017

This seminar is designed to introduce students to the literature of African-American History, from the colonial era to the end of Reconstruction.  Major themes and debates will be highlighted, including the political, economic, social, and cultural experiences of African-Americans.  The course will help students define specific interests within the field and aid in preparation for examinations.  Students will read a book a week and spend the semester writing a 20-25 page historiographical essay.

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
12
Course Type: 

Afro-American History to 1865

HIUS
3651
Undergraduate
Fall
2017

In this course, we will interrogate the history of people of African descent in the United States, from the trans-Atlantic slave trade to the Civil War.  We will discuss major events in early African-American history to consider how the twin engines of slavery and the quest for freedom shaped the lives of millions of African and African-American people in the United States.  Students will consider how social, economic, political, and legal frameworks established in the period between the colonial era and the Civil War influenced the lived experiences of African Americans, enslaved and free.  Topics will include: pre-colonial West and Central Africa, the trans-Atlantic slave trade, the development of North American slavery, resistance and revolution in Atlantic slave communities, gradual emancipation laws, economics of slavery, the gendered experience in slavery and freedom, and black people’s participation in anti-slavery politics.  Students will learn about the multifaceted experiences of African Americans by analyzing primary and secondary sources, films, and historical fiction.

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
40
Course Type: 

Seminar in United States History

Capitalism and Slavery
HIUS
4501
Undergraduate
Spring
2017

In recent years, scholars have debated the following question: What was the relationship between the proliferation of slavery and the rise of capitalist economic development in the United States, specifically, and the Atlantic World more broadly?  This course will offer students the opportunity to interrogate and answer this question.  In this course, students will learn about early American economic history through the lens of slavery, beginning with Native American contact with European colonists, continuing through the trans-Atlantic slave trade, and ending in America’s post-Reconstruction era.  Students will be expected to read one book-length manuscript per week and complete an article-length (25 pages) research paper by semester’s end.  Readings will include: John Thornton’s Africa and Africans in the Making of the Atlantic World, 1400-1800, Eric Williams’ Capitalism & Slavery, Edward Baptist’s The Half Has Never Been Told: Slavery and the Making of American Slavery, Walter Johnson’s The River of Dark Dreams: Slavery and Empire in the Cotton Kingdom, and Sven Beckert’s Empire of Cotton: A Global History

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
12
Course Type: 

New Course in United States History

American Slavery
HIUS
2559
Undergraduate
Spring
2017

Over four hundred years, twelve million Africans were forcibly transported to the Americas.  Enslaved Africans lived, labored, and died in various regions of the Atlantic world, from Brazil to Barbados, Saint Domingue to Saint Croix.  In this course, students will explore how slavery developed in one region of the Atlantic world, a small group of British colonies that would become the United States of America.  Broadly, students will be introduced to the history of slavery and emancipation in the United States.  Specifically, students will examine the ways in which slavery as an economic, legal, and social institution influenced the lived experiences of people involved, both directly and tangentially, in slavery’s growth and its ultimate contentious demise.  During the semester, we will discuss a variety of topics, including, but not limited to:  the creation of the African Atlantic world, the politics of the American Colonization Society, motherhood in slavery, and the literature of runaway slaves. 

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
40
Course Type: 

Introductory Seminar in U.S History

American Slavery and the Law
HIUS
1501
Undergraduate
Fall
2016

This seminar will explore the complex relationship between slavery and the American legal system between 1619 and 1877.  From colonial slave codes and gradual emancipation statutes to federal fugitive slave acts and the Reconstruction Amendments, students will delve into the legalities of slavery in the United States.  During the semester, we will discuss topics that include: the meaning of freedom in a slave society, the legal logistics of gradual emancipation, enslaved peoples’ property ownership, and the legal relationship between enslaved people, slaveholders, and non-slaveholders, and free people of color.  Students will also research, draft, and revise an independent research paper on a topic of their choosing, in consultation with the instructor. 

Course Instructor: 

African American History to 1865

HIUS
3651
Undergraduate
Fall
2016

In this course, we will interrogate the history of people of African descent in the United States, from the trans-Atlantic slave trade to the outbreak of the Civil War.  We will discuss major events in early African-American history to consider how the twin engines of slavery and the quest for freedom shaped the lives of millions of African and African-American people in the United States.  Students will consider how social, economic, political, and legal frameworks established in the period between the colonial era and the Civil War influenced the lived experiences of African Americans, enslaved and free.  Topics will include: pre-colonial West and Central Africa, the trans-Atlantic slave trade, the development of North American slavery, resistance and revolution in Atlantic slave communities, gradual emancipation laws, economics of slavery, the gendered experience in slavery and freedom, and black people’s participation in anti-slavery politics.  Students will learn about the multifaceted experiences of African Americans by analyzing primary and secondary sources, films, and historical fiction.

Course Instructor: 
Subscribe to Hill, Justene

Corcoran Department of History
University of Virginia
Nau Hall - South Lawn
Charlottesville, VA 22904

  

Contact:
(434) 924-7147
(434) 924-7891
M-F 8am to 4:30pm
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