Harold, Claudrena N.

Black Fire

HIUS
3654
Undergraduate
Spring
2018

If you were rating the racial climate at the University of Virginia on a scale of 1-10, what score would you give the University?  Does the idea of a "post-racial society" hold true when we examine the complex nature of social and cultural life at UVA?  How and to what degree have the individual and collective experiences of African American undergraduates transformed since the late 1960's?  Is there still a need for the Black Student Alliance, the Office of African American Affairs, and the Office of Diversity and Equity?  Is Black Studies still an intellectual necessity in the 21st century academy?   Have these entities been successful in bringing about meaningful change in the experiences of underrepresented minorities at UVA?  And if not, how can future efforts to make the University a more equitable democratic institution benefit from a critical engagement with past struggles for social justice and racial equality?

To facilitate critical thinking and exchange on these and other important questions, this course grounds contemporary debates on the state of race relations at UVA within the larger, historical context of the "black Wahoo" experience.  In addition to exploring contemporary issues affecting academic, cultural, and social life on grounds, our classroom and online activities draw attention to an important yet insufficiently explored chapter in the history of "Jefferson's University" by examining the varied ways in which various student-led movements have transformed the intellectual culture and social fabric of everyday life at the University.  How those transformations continue to shape our experiences on grounds will be a topic of frequent discussions.  Over the course of the semester students will explore a wide range of topics, including but not restricted to: black-white student relations, affirmative action, African American Greek life, the black student athlete, the racial politics of major selection, the living wage as both a class and a race issue, the black arts and hip-hop scene on grounds, and ethnic coalitions and conflict between African American, African, and American African students. 

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
160
Course Type: 

Seminar in United States History

Black Power
HIUS
4501
Undergraduate
Fall
2017

Over the course of the semester, students will examine the dynamic ways people of African descent in the United States have struggled for cultural, economic, and political empowerment during the Civil Rights and Black Power eras. Much of the class will focus on the 1960s and the 1970s; however, previous and subsequent periods will also be analyzed.  Students should leave this class with not only a broader knowledge of  “Black Power” as a cultural, political, and ideological movement, but also with a more nuanced understanding of the research methods and interpretive frameworks utilized by historians, as well as other social scientists, interested in Black Power in particular and the Black freedom struggle in general.   Students will have the opportunity to further develop their research skills and techniques through a series of assignments designed to assist them in identifying research topics and questions, interpreting primary and secondary texts, and substantiating arguments with “sound” evidence.

It should be noted that this course will also focus on the local dimension of Black Power by engaging student activism on UVA’s campus between 1968 and 1984. Significant attention will be given to students’ fight for a Black Studies department at UVA, their massive demonstrations against racial apartheid in South Africa, and their general struggle to make the University a more egalitarian place.     

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
12
Course Type: 

History of American Labor

HIUS
3471
Undergraduate
Fall
2017

This course examines the economic, cultural, and political lives of the US working class from the end of the Civil War to the present. Over the course of the semester, students will analyze how laboring women and men both shaped and were shaped by the rise of big business during the Gilded Age, the social upheavals of the World War I era, the economic hardships brought about by the Great Depression, the social policies of the New Deal, the emergence of the Civil Rights Movement, and continuing debates over the meanings of work, citizenship, and democracy. Significant attention will be given to the organizations workers created to advance their economic interests.

 

The course will explore the success and failures of the Knights of Labor, the American Federation of Labor, the Congress of Industrial Organizations, the Communist Party, the SEIU, and various Living Wage Coalitions, among other groups. A major issue to be explored in our discussions of working-class movements will be the ways in which laboring people have been divided along racial, gender, ethnic, and regional lines.  Since working-class history is about more than the struggle of laboring people to improve their material condition, this course will also focus topics such as workers’ leisure activities, customs and thoughts, and religious beliefs. 

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
60
Course Type: 

Black Fire

HIUS
3654
Undergraduate
Spring
2017

If you were rating the racial climate at the University of Virginia on a scale of 1-10, what score would you give the University?  Does the idea of a "post-racial society" hold true when we examine the complex nature of social and cultural life at UVA?  How and to what degree have the individual and collective experiences of African American undergraduates transformed since the late 1960's?  Is there still a need for the Black Student Alliance, the Office of African American Affairs, and the Office of Diversity and Equity?  Is Black Studies still an intellectual necessity in the 21st century academy?   Have these entities been successful in bringing about meaningful change in the experiences of underrepresented minorities at UVA?  And if not, how can future efforts to make the University a more equitable democratic institution benefit from a critical engagement with past struggles for social justice and racial equality?

To facilitate critical thinking and exchange on these and other important questions, this course grounds contemporary debates on the state of race relations at UVA within the larger, historical context of the "black Wahoo" experience.  In addition to exploring contemporary issues affecting academic, cultural, and social life on grounds, our classroom and online activities draw attention to an important yet insufficiently explored chapter in the history of "Jefferson's University" by examining the varied ways in which various student-led movements have transformed the intellectual culture and social fabric of everyday life at the University.  How those transformations continue to shape our experiences on grounds will be a topic of frequent discussions.  Over the course of the semester students will explore a wide range of topics, including but not restricted to: black-white student relations, affirmative action, African American Greek life, the black student athlete, the racial politics of major selection, the living wage as both a class and a race issue, the black arts and hip-hop scene on grounds, and ethnic coalitions and conflict between African American, African, and American African students. 

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
100
Course Type: 

New Course in United States History

Sounds of Blackness
HIUS
3559
Undergraduate
Fall
2016

This course examines black popular music from the Civil Rights era to the contemporary moment.  Much of the course focuses on the musical practices of African Americans; however our readings and discussions take seriously the deep connections between African American musical practices and other modes of cultural exchange within black diasporic communities in the United States and beyond. 

Course Instructor: 
Course Type: 
Discussion Sections: 
0

Black Fire

HIUS
3654
Fall
2016

Does the idea of a "post-racial society" hold true when we examine the complex nature of social and cultural life at the University of Virginia?  How and to what degree have the individual and collective experiences of African American undergraduates transformed since the late 1960's?  Is there still a need for the Black Student Alliance, the Office of African American Affairs, and the Office of Diversity and Equity?  Is Black Studies still an intellectual necessity in the 21st century academy?  Have these entities been successful in bringing about meaningful change in the experiences of underrepresented minorities?  And if not, how can future efforts to make the University a more inclusive institution benefit from a critical engagement with past struggles for social justice and racial equality?  Moreover, how might we find a way to more effectively bring the many segments of UVa's black community(Athletes, black Greeks, second generation immigrants, Christians, Muslims, etc) together?

To facilitate critical thinking and exchange on these and other important questions, this hybrid course grounds contemporary debates on the state of race relations at UVA within the larger, historical context of the "black Wahoo" experience.  In addition to exploring contemporary issues affecting academic, cultural, and social life on grounds, our classroom and online activities draw attention to an important yet insufficiently explored chapter in the history of "Jefferson's University" by examining the varied ways in which various student-led movements have transformed the intellectual culture and social fabric of everyday life at the University.  How those transformations continue to shape our experiences on grounds will be a topic of frequent discussion.  Though the focus of this course is local, we will explore topics that have and continue to engage college students across the nation:  the Integration of African Americans into the post-civil rights, historically white university, the political potential of Greek organizations, the status of the black athlete, the viability of the African American Studies program and departments, and the impact of Affirmative Action on higher education. 

Course Instructor: 

Black Power

HIUS
4501
Undergraduate
Spring
2016

Over the course of the semester, students will examine the dynamic ways African Americans have struggled for cultural, economic, and political empowerment during the Civil Rights and Black Power eras. Much of the class will focus on the 1960s and the 1970s; however, previous and subsequent periods will also be analyzed.  Students should leave this class with not only a broader knowledge of  “Black Power” as a cultural, political, and ideological movement, but also with a more nuanced understanding of the research methods and interpretive frameworks utilized by historians, as well as other social scientists, interested in Black Power in particular and the Black freedom struggle in general.   Students will have the opportunity to further develop their research skills and techniques through a series of assignments designed to assist them in identifying research topics and questions, interpreting primary and secondary texts, and substantiating arguments with “sound” evidence.

It should be noted that this course will also focus on the local dimension of Black Power by engaging student activism on UVA’s campus between 1968 and 1984. Significant attention will be given to students’ fight for a Black Studies department at UVA, their massive demonstrations against racial apartheid in South Africa, and their general struggle to make the University a more egalitarian place.

Course Instructor: 

Labor History

HIUS
3471
Undergraduate
Fall
2015

This course examines the cultural lives, labor struggles, and political activities of the American working class from the end of the Civil War to the present . Over the course of the semester, students will analyze how working women and men both shaped and were shaped by the rise of big business during the Gilded Age, the social upheavals of the World War I era, the economic hardships brought about by the Great Depression, the social policies of the New Deal, the emergence of the Civil Rights Movement, and continuing debates over the meanings of work, citizenship, and democracy. Significant attention will be given to the organizations workers created to advance their economic interests. The course will explore the success and failures of the Knights of Labor, the American Federation of Labor, the Congress of Industrial Organizations, the Communist Party, among other groups. A major issue to be explored in our discussions of working-class movements will be the ways in which laboring people have been divided along racial, gender, ethnic, and regional lines.  Since working-class history is about more than the struggle of laboring people to improve their material condition, this course will also focus on other topics, such as workers’ leisure activities, customs and thoughts, and religious beliefs.

Course Instructor: 

New Course in United States History

"Motown to Hip Hop"
HIUS
3559
Undergraduate
Fall
2015

This course explores black modern music from the Civil Rights era to the present. Looking specifically at the genres of soul, funk, jazz, and hip-hop, it takes a bold, sweeping look at the role of popular music in African Americans’ push for self-definition, political power, and social recognition. Students will consider how musical expression and consumption have provided black women and men with a vehicle for entertainment, community building, political organizing, and economic uplift.  Some of the artists that we will explore in-depth include but are not limited to James Brown,  Sam Cooke, the Supremes, Marvin Gaye, Michael Jackson, Aretha Franklin, Jimi Hendrix, Miles Davis, Nina Simone, Public Enemy, Earth, Wind and Fire, Parliament-Funkadelic, Luther Vandross,  Whitney Houston, Lauryn Hill,  Tribe Called Quest, Jay-Z, Kendrick Lamar, and D’Angelo. Through an engagement with these and other artists’ sonic and visual representations, students will address larger questions surrounding the political power of music in American society.

Course Instructor: 
Subscribe to Harold, Claudrena N.

Corcoran Department of History
University of Virginia
Nau Hall - South Lawn
Charlottesville, VA 22904

  

Contact:
(434) 924-7147
(434) 924-7891
M-F 8am to 4:30pm
Department Contacts