Gallagher, Gary W.

Voices of the Civil War

HIUS
4260
Undergraduate
Spring
2018

This course explores major themes relating to the American Civil War through the words of individuals who experienced it. Using wartime and postwar writings, fiction and nonfiction, as well as photography and film, students will focus on why the war came; how it evolved from a struggle for Union to one for Union and freedom; how the conflict affected civilians; why soldiers fought; and how participants on each side chose to remember the conflict. The “voices” in the course will include men and women, white and black, military and nonmilitary, and Union and Confederate. Among the writers the syllabus is likely to include are Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant, Ambrose Bierce, Kate Stone, Robert Gould Shaw, Sam Watkins, Edward Porter Alexander, Phoebe Yates Pember, Walt Whitman, Louisa May Alcott, and African Americans engaged in the process of emancipation. The reading load is approximately 300 pages per week, and regular attendance and significant participation in class discussion are essential. Students must secure instructor’s permission to enroll.

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
6
Course Type: 

The Civil War and Reconstruction

HIUS
3072
Undergraduate
Spring
2017

This course explores the era of the American Civil War with emphasis on the period 1861-1865. It combines lectures, readings, films, and class discussion to address such questions as why the war came, why the North won (or the Confederacy lost), how the war affected various elements of society, what was left unresolved at the end of the fighting, and how subsequent generations of Americans understood the conflict's meanings. Although this is not a course on Civil War battles and generals, about 50 per cent of the time in class will be devoted to military affairs, and we will make a special effort to tie events on the battlefield to life behind the lines.

The course will be organized in two lecture meetings a week. Grades will be based on two geography quizzes (each 5% of the course grade), two take-home examinations (each 35% of the course grade), and a 7-page paper that integrates material from the lectures, readings, and films (20% of the course grade).

 

Note:  This course does not satisfy the second writing requirement.

 

Required Books (some substitutions may be made):

David W. Blight, Frederick Douglass’ Civil War

Robert Bonner, The Soldier’s Pen

Jacqueline G. Campbell, When Sherman Marched North from the Sea

William J. Cooper, ed., Jefferson Davis: The Essential Writings

Andrew Delbanco, ed., The Portable Abraham Lincoln

Charles B. Dew, Apostles of Disunion

Gary W. Gallagher, Becoming Confederates

Gary W. Gallagher and Joan Waugh, The American War

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
40
Course Type: 

Civil War and Reconstruction

HIUS
3072
Undergraduate
Spring
2016

This course explores the era of the American Civil War with emphasis on the period 1861-1865. It combines lectures, readings, films, and class discussion to address such questions as why the war came, why the North won (or the Confederacy lost), how the war affected various elements of society, what was left unresolved at the end of the fighting, and how subsequent generations of Americans understood the conflict's meanings. Although this is not a course on Civil War battles and generals, about 50 per cent of the time in class will be devoted to military affairs, and we will make a special effort to tie events on the battlefield to life behind the lines.

The course will be organized in two lecture meetings a week. Grades will be based on two geography quizzes (each 5% of the course grade), two take-home examinations (each 35% of the course grade), and a 7-page paper that integrates material from the lectures, readings, and films (20% of the course grade).

Note:  This course does not satisfy the second writing requirement.

 

Required Books (some substitutions may be made):

Jacqueline G. Campbell, When Sherman Marched North from the Sea:

Resistance on the Confederate Home Front 

William J. Cooper. ed., Jefferson Davis: The Essential Writings

Charles B. Dew, Apostles of Disunion: Southern Secession Commissioners

and the Causes of the Civil War

Gary W. Gallagher, Becoming Confederates: Paths to a New National Loyalty 

Gary W. Gallagher, ed., The Richmond Campaign of 1862: The Peninsula and

the Seven Days

William E. Gienapp, ed., This Fiery Trial: The Speeches and Writings of Abraham

            Lincoln

E. S. Redkey, A Grand Army of Black Men

Joan Waugh, U.S. Grant: American Hero, American Myth

Course Instructor: 

Foundational Texts in 19th-Century United States History

HIUS
9027
Graduate
Spring
2016

This course acquaints students with foundational texts relating to 19th-Century United States history.  The primary goal is to provide a sound understanding of books, essays, and other documents that often are mentioned but too seldom read carefully.  The readings will convey crucial insights into political, social, cultural, military, diplomatic, and economic history. 

Course Instructor: 

American Military History to 1900

HIST
2051
Undergraduate
Spring
2016
This course explores military events and developments from the period of the North American colonial wars through the end of the 19th Century. It combines lectures and discussion sections to address such topics as the debate over the role of the military in a free society, the interaction between the military and civilian spheres in American history, and the development of a professional army and navy. Although this is not a course on battles and generals, significant time in class will be devoted to crucial events and leaders in the Revolutionary War, the war with Mexico, the Civil War, and other major conflicts.
 
The course will be organized into two lecture meetings and one discussion section each week. Grades will be based on two take-home examinations (70%) and contributions to the weekly discussion sections (30%).
 
Required Readings (some substitutions may be made):
 
Gallagher, Gary W. The Union War
Glatthaar, Joseph T. Partners in Command: The Relationships between Leaders in the Civil War 
Paul Andrew Hutton, Phil Sheridan and His Army
Martin, James Kirby, and Lender, Mark Edward. A Respectable Army: The Military Origins of the Republic, 1763-1789  (2nd, edition)
Taylor, Alan. The Civil War of 1812: American Citizens, British Subjects, Irish Rebels, and Indian Allies
Winders, Richard Bruce. Mr. Polk's Army: The American Military Experience in the Mexican War
 
Course Instructor: 
Subscribe to Gallagher, Gary W.

Corcoran Department of History
University of Virginia
Nau Hall - South Lawn
Charlottesville, VA 22904

  

Contact:
(434) 924-7147
(434) 924-7891
M-F 8am to 4:30pm
Department Contacts