Braun, Herbert

Modern Central America

HILA
3051
Undergraduate
Spring
2017

The Lived Experience in 20th Century Central America

How have Central Americans and Americans experienced the twentieth century in Central America?  We will be reading testimonials, memoirs, documentaries and novels to get at the personal experiences of daily life in these deeply conflicted social orders.   We will read them in the following order, together with a synthetic history of Central American countries by John Booth.   I am not asking the bookstore to get them, as you can obtain them all much cheaper on line.  You will write a journal in two installlments, and a final 15 page essay for the course.  No exams. All the books are fantastic, and good reads.   Do not buy the June Erlick book, as I will lend you a copy. 

Omar Cabezas, Fire From the Mountain

Stephen Kinzer, Blood of Brothers:  Life and War in Nicaragua                 

Gioconda Belli, The Country Under My Skin

Stephen Schlesinger, Bitter Fruit:  The Story of the American Coup in Guatemala

June Erlick, Disappeared:  A Journalist Silenced

Rigoberta Menchú, I, Rigoberta Menchú:  An Indian Woman From Guatemala

Francisco Goldman, The Art of Political Murder

María López Vigil, Oscar Romero:  Memories in Mosaic

Ana Carrigan, Salvador Witness

Manlio Argueta, One Day of Life

Mark Danner, The Massacre at El Mozote

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
35
Course Type: 

Introductory Seminar in History

Respect and Insult in History
HIST
1501
Undergraduate
Fall
2016

Respect and insult are something that human beings do.  They are acts, performances, carried out through bodily gestures and spoken words. Respect and insult are feelings, emotions, which individuals get from others.  These actions and emotions take place in surrounding circumstances, social conditions. 

In this reading and writing seminar we will look into the relationships between those acts and feelings, which we will broadly call “agency”,  AND the conditions in which they occur, which we will call “structures”.  In this seminar you will learn to think explicitly about the relationships between individual agency and social structures.  Insult and respect are tangible; structures are often unseen. 

Respect and insult are not simply individual acts and feelings.  And, they are tied to one another.  Where there is a lot of respect, there is little insult; where there is a lot of insult, there is little respect. 

Is there a lot of insult in your lives?  A lot of respect?  What about on college campuses these days? How are respect and insult expressed and felt in different times and places?  Are there clear differences in them in societies with a hierarchical culture and those with an egalitarian one?  Why is it that in a seminar like this one, are we focusing more on insult than on respect when there is almost certainly more respect in people’s lives than insult?

Weekly readings are between 100 and 150 pages.  You will write an on-going, extensive journal throughout the semester, always adding, changing, composing, making it better, adding themes, thoughts, reflections.  The instructor will review your journal every three weeks.  There are no exams. 

We will read FROM among these works and perhaps from others:

Edward Shils, “Deference”

Peter Berger, “On the Obsolescence of the Concept of Honor”

Roberto daMatta, “The Quest for Citizenship in a Relational Universe

Joanne Freeman, Affairs of Honor:  National Politics in the New Republic

Richard Rodriguez, Hunger of Memory

Games Gilligan, Violence:  Reflections on a National Epidemic

Alan Page Fiske, Virtuous Violence

Philippe Bourgois, In Search of Respect:  Selling Crack in the Barrio

Roger Gould, Collision of Wills

Matthew Desmond, Evicted:  Poverty and Profit in the American City

William Ian Miller, Humiliation

Peter Gay, The Cultivation of Hatred

Sarah Chambers, From Subjects to Citizens

Sara Lawrence-Lightfoot, Respect:  An Exploration

Course Instructor: 

Public Life in Modern Latin America

HILA
3111
Fall
2016

How do Latin Americans navigate their ways, collectively and also individually, through their hierarchical social orders?  Why is there so much stability and order to their societies?  Surveys inform us that Latin Americans are among the happiest people in the world.  Why might this be?  Why do so many Latin Americans across time appear to be so proud of their nations?  Why do they look at one another so often?  Why is there so little hatred in Latin America?  Why do poor people in Latin America seem to know more about rich people than rich people know about them?  Why do traditions matter so?  Why are there so many good novelists there?  These and other questions, answerable or not, about life and the human condition in Latin America are what will be about in this course.  

Probable texts:  Ernesto Che Guevera, The Motorcycle Diaries

Carlos Fuentes, The Campaign, On-line used copy

John Charles Chasteen, Heroes on Horseback:  The Life and Times of the Last Gaucho Caudillos

Carlos Fuentes, The Good Conscience

Julia Alvarez, In the Time of the Butterflies

Philippe Bourgois, In Search of Retrospect:  Selling Crack in the Barrio

David Goldstein, The Spectacular City:  Violence and Performance in Urban Bolivia

Stan Lazar, El Alto, Rebel City:  Self and Citizenship in Andean Bolivia

Alma Guillermoprieto, Samba

Forrest Colburn, Latin America and the End of Politics

Grading:  The journal, submitted as a work in progress during any day between November 1 and November 7, worth 30% of the grade, written continuously on Word, and sent as an email attachment.  A twenty page final essay on historical patterns in Latin America, worth 40% of the grade.  This final essay will emerge organically from the journal.  Hard copy.  Class participation, according to a structured format, worth 30% of the grade. 

Course Instructor: 

The Individual in History

HIST
4511
Undergraduate
Spring
2016

This seminar is a transnational but not quite global history of the ‘the individualistic revolution’ from the eighteeenth century to the present, and the swirling controversies that have ensued.  It is composed of three chronological parts:  1) a review of the great historical thinkers on the places of the individual within the collective as the rise of the individual is taking place; 2) the twentieth century controversies surrounding the prominent place of the individual in both ‘modern’ and ‘traditional’ social orders by liberal, conservative, radical and libertarian thinkers; 3) investigations on the contemporary (since ca 1980) controversies in various parts of the world on this issue.  Students will write a twenty page essay on the places of the individual in history by taking material from the three sections on which the seminar is built. 

Course Instructor: 

The Lived Experience in 20th Century Central America

HILA
3051
Undergraduate
Spring
2016
How have Central Americans and Americans experienced the twentieth century in Central America?  We will be reading testimonials, memoirs, documentaries and novels to get at the personal experiences of daily life in these deeply conflicted social orders.   We will read them in the following order, together with a synthetic history of Central American countries by John Booth.   I am not asking the bookstore to get them, as you can obtain them all much cheaper on line.  You will write a journal in two installlments, and a final 15 page essay for the course.  No exams. All the books are fantastic, and good reads.   Do not buy the June Erlick book, as I will lend you a copy. 
 
John Booth, Understanding Central America (Sixth Edition)
Omar Cabezas, Fire From the Mountain
Stephen Kinzer, Blood of Brothers:  Life and War in Nicaragua                 
Gioconda Belli, The Country Under My Skin
Sergio Ramírez, Adiós Muchachos
Stephen Schlesinger, Bitter Fruit:  The Story of the American Coup in Guatemala
June Erlick, Disappeared:  A Journalist Silenced
Rigoberta Menchú, I, Rigoberta Menchú:  An Indian Woman From Guatemala
Francisco Goldman, The Art of Political Murder
María López Vigil, Oscar Romero:  Memories in Mosaic
Ana Carrigan, Salvador Witness
Manlio Argueta, One Day of Life
Mark Danner, The Massacre at El Mozote
Course Instructor: 

Colloquium in Latin American History

"Cohesion and Contestation in Latin American History"
HILA
4511
Undergraduate
Fall
2015

This is a seminar on Latin American history and on its historiography, that is, how it is studied and written about by historians.   We will read and analyze nine historical monographs for underlying themes and approaches, from the early colonial period to the neat present.   Students will write and present four interpretive essays of five pages each, and a final essay between ten and twelve pages. 

Inga Clendinnen, Ambivalent Conquests:  Maya and Spaniard in Yucatan, 1517-1570

R. Douglas Cope, The Limits of Racial Domination:  Plebeian Society in Colonial   Mexico City, 1660-1720

Yanna Yannakakis, The Art of Beieng in-Between:  Native Intermediaries, Indian Identity, and Local Rule in Colonial Oaxaca

Sarah Chambers, From Subjects to Citizens:  Honor, Gender, and Politics in Arequipa, Peru, 1780-1854

Richard Graham, Feeding the City:  From Street Market to Liberal Reform in Salvador, Brazil, 1780-1860

James Sanders, Contentious Republicans:  Popular Politics, Race, and Class in Nineteenth-Century Colombia

John Womack, Zapata and the Mexican Revolution

Herbert Braun, The Assassination of Gaitán:  Public Life and Urban Violence in Colombia

Peter Winn, Weavers of Revolution:  The Yarur Workers and Chile’s Road to Socialism

Course Instructor: 
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Corcoran Department of History
University of Virginia
Nau Hall - South Lawn
Charlottesville, VA 22904

  

Contact:
(434) 924-7147
(434) 924-7891
M-F 8am to 4:30pm
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