Bishara, Fahad

New Course in Middle Eastern History

Econ Hist of Islamic World
HIME
2559
Undergraduate
Spring
2018

Economic History of the Islamic World. "This course is designed to introduce students to the economic history of the Islamic World - a broad region stretching from West Africa to Indonesia - over the duration of roughly 1300 years of history. We explore the ideologies, institutions, and practices of commerce in Muslim society, paying close attention to the actors, artifacts, and encounters, that gave it shape over the course of a millennium, ending with the rise of Islamic banking in the twentieth century. We will explore the relationship between Islamic law and commerce, Muslim engagement with an expanding world of trade, and how the forces of global capitalism shaped (and  transformed) Muslim society. To do this, we will combine broad sweeps of events in Islamic and world history with fine-grained analyses of primary documents and close readings of secondary sources. No prior knowledge of Islamic history or economic history is assumed.

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
40
Course Type: 

Arabian Seas: Islam, Trade and Empire in the Mediterranean and Indian Ocean

HIME
3195
Undergraduate
Spring
2018

The course is designed to introduce the Arabian Sea as a region linking the Middle East, East Africa, South and Southeast Asia. With a focus on both continuities and rupture, we study select cultures and societies brought into contact through trade, migration. and travel across the Indian Ocean over a broad arc of history. We explore how nobles, merchants, soldiers, statesmen, sailors, laborers, scholars, and slaves engaged in different types of mobility, and how their actions led to the forging of a shared world, from the early period until the present. By building a world-historical narrative that connects Asia, Africa, and the Middle East, we will be able to historicize many of the phenomena that we associate with “globalization” in the world today, while taking seriously the idea of seas as arenas of history.

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
60
Course Type: 
Discussion Sections: 
3

Colloquium in Middle East History

Islam and Capitalism
HIME
4511
Undergraduate
Fall
2017

For nearly a century now, scholars have been positing an antithetical relationship between capitalism and Islam, framing the perceived underdevelopment of the Islamic world in terms of an absence of the rational spirit of capitalism, restrictions put in place by Islamic law, or more fundamentally as a clash between two competing ideologies (“jihad” vs “McWorld”). This course seeks to familiarize students with the debates surrounding the supposed tension between Islam and capitalism, but also explores the development of ideas and practices on capitalism and commercial society within the broader Islamic world, stretching from the Western Mediterranean to the Eastern Indian Ocean. We will look at the scholarship produced on the subject, but will also explore the everyday commercial practices, discourses, and artifacts that animated Muslim commercial society over the course of centuries. Students will leave with a deep appreciation of the contingencies surrounding the history of capitalism in the Islamic world, but also a sense of the genealogies of capitalist societies in the region. Our focus thus isn’t simply on how capitalism has shaped or transformed Muslim society, but how Muslims around the world have domesticated the forces of global capitalism – and perhaps even generated their own visions of a uniquely Islamic brand of capitalism.

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
15
Course Type: 

Major Seminar

Global Capitalism Since 1750
HIST
4501
Undergraduate
Spring
2017

This course explores the history of capitalism in a post-Industrial Revolution world, and is driven by two questions: how did we get from the textured political economy of the early eighteenth century to the disembodied market processes that we understand to be “the economy” today; and how does this changing body of economic thought reflect the dynamic world of industrial capitalism, empire, and global politics of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries? Through a historically-minded engagement different texts in economic thought, both Western and otherwise, we chart the emergence of a discipline of economics – one that distinguished itself from classical political economy in its methodologies and concerns, and that was deeply embedded in the changing commercial and industrial world into which it was born. In doing so, we create a more textured narrative of how we ended up with what we understand to be “the economy” – both as a theoretical concept and a lived reality.

At the same time, we map the circulation of these new ideas – of political economy, of “economics”, and of imagined alternatives – around the globe. We examine how these ideas were given articulation through 19th- and 20th-century global empires and the modern corporation, bridging South Asia, the Middle East, Africa, and Latin America into a singular, unified image of a global economy (although for purposes of depth, we will primarily focus on India and Egypt). We also explore how scholars, teachers, and jurists developed their own visions of the marketplace that sometimes complemented and other times actively confronted the global economy. At its core, the course is an opportunity for students to acquaint themselves with the history of modern capitalism around the world while actively engaging with classic texts in the history of Western and non-Western economic thought.

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
12
Course Type: 

New Course in General History

Indian Ocean history
HIST
2559
Undergraduate
Spring
2017

The course is designed to introduce the Indian Ocean as a region linking the Middle East, East Africa, South and Southeast Asia. With a focus on both continuities and rupture, we study select cultures and societies brought into contact through trade, migration. and travel across the Indian Ocean over a broad arc of history. We explore how nobles, merchants, soldiers, statesmen, sailors, laborers, scholars, and slaves engaged in different types of mobility, and how their actions led to the forging of a shared world, from the early period until the present. By building a world-historical narrative that connects Asia, Africa, and the Middle East, we will be able to historicize many of the phenomena that we associate with “globalization” in the world today.

Rather than a comprehensive overview, this course provides a general set of conceptual and analytic tools for understanding empires, migrations, and adaptations across temporal and spatial bounds. At the heart of the course is a challenge to traditional area studies boundaries by thinking about actors, institutions, and historical processes that traverse those boundaries and create altogether new geographies. Using an array of different primary sources, we look at particular case studies and their broader social and cultural contexts

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
40
Course Type: 

Introductory Seminar in History

Law and Order in World History
HIST
1501
Undergraduate
Fall
2016

Where does law come from, and how does it structure our everyday interactions? This course explores how different societies have drawn on state legislation, courts, community norms, and other sources of law to bring order to the world around them, and how individuals exploited the tensions between legal systems to make their own claims to authority. Students will leave with a strong grasp of law in its many forms and its importance to shaping politics, economies, and societies in world history.  

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
15
Course Type: 
Subscribe to Bishara, Fahad

Corcoran Department of History
University of Virginia
Nau Hall - South Lawn
Charlottesville, VA 22904

  

Contact:
(434) 924-7147
(434) 924-7891
M-F 8am to 4:30pm
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