Barnett, Richard

History and Civilization of Medieval India

HISA
2002
Undergraduate
Fall
2018

Goals of the course

            Ancient India was an Indic Civilization; medieval and modern South Asia became Indo-Islamic.  This course goes beneath the political, cultural, and ethnic warfare of present-day South Asia to discover and assess the growth and development of this Indo-Islamic legacy.   By challenging various communalist, regionalist, colonial, and post-colonial assertions, we suggest how Indian, Pakistani,  and Bangladeshi publics (and their well-wishers) might revise the ideologically-driven, media-exploited, and socially  devastating stereotypes and misunderstandings of their medieval and early modern pasts.  

 

Topical Focus

            We cover Medieval Indo-Muslim  civilization and political systems from the time Muslims arrived there; Turkic invasions; the urban revolution 13-14C; major Islamic dynasties, especially the Delhi Sultanate; Indian Sufi mysticism; Bhakti mysticism; the cosmopolitan Vijayanagara Empire; the Mughals; imperial decentralization and cultural fluorescence; the rise of regional political systems; early Europeans in South Asia; establishment of English domination of the maritime provinces and hegemony over some hinterland states; beginnings of the British Raj.   

           

            Emphasis will be on cultural and intellectual as well as political history, on major ethnic and confessional identities within India, and on the South as well as the North.   Our geographical spread is modern Afghanistan to East Bengal, and Kashmir to Ceylon, with a lecture- discussion format, student participation, audio-visual materials, frequent handouts of study aids, and a free-wheeling narrative style.

 

 

Requirements You may choose between the two plans below, according to your personal aptitudes:

 

                                    I                                                                       II                     

                        One mid-term  50%                             One map exercise*      20%    

                        The final exam 50%                             One mid-term               40%      

                                                                                    The final exam            40%    

                                                                                               

 *See Map Exercise list; due in class Thurs. 15 September, at the start of class.    

 

Texts and Assignments  

            Readings are grouped topically, divided into required and suggested, and listed in no special order.  All required readings are on 2-hour reserve.    A photocopy packet is available at N K Print and Design (7 Elliewood Ave), and is denoted below as PHOCO.   Our texts are for sale in University Bookstore:

 

            Catherine B. Asher and Cynthia Talbot, India Before Europe (Cambridge U.P., 2006)

            Annemarie Schimmel, The Empire of the Great Mughals (London: Reaktion Books, 2004)  

            Richard M. Eaton, The Rise of Islam and the Bengal Frontier (Berkeley: U.C. Press, 1993)

 

Lectures and Readings.  

            Serious students should familiarize themselves with those suggested readings marked (*).  All are very strongly urged to read ahead of the lectures.  Asking in an uninformed way about something in class that is clearly presented in the readings will reveal what you have not done, and will reduce everyone’s level of comfort, especially that of the very able TA for the class, Swati Chawla.

            Note: the lectures, not being crammed into predigested time slots, are not dated. The reason?  It allows free play of discussion, Q & A, and tangents in class.   If this bothers you, do not take this class.  The date of the mid-term will be decided by majority vote.  The map is due on a fixed date.

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
40
Course Type: 

Introductory Seminar in South Asia

AFPAK: Civl Soc & Insurgency
HISA
1501
Undergraduate
Fall
2018

Subject and focus:  Two modern nation-states under enormous stress.  Assessing society and politics in Afghanistan and Pakistan will sharpen our historical awareness, help us understand the world’s most lasting, urgent, and frustrating confrontation, and polish our writing and debating skills.  No acquaintance with South  Asia, or even with history, is assumed   Readings must be completed before class (see dated headings, below) to maintain an intelligent, active level of discussion and participation. 

 

Texts at U.Va. Bookstore:

            Anatol Lieven, Pakistan: a Hard Country (New York: Perseus, 2011)

            Hassan Abbas, The Taliban Revival: Violence and Extremism on the Pakistan

                        Afghanistan Frontier (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2014)

            David Pinault, Notes from the Fortune-telling Parrot: Islam and the Struggle

                        for Religious Pluralism in Pakistan (London: Equinox, 2008)

            Thomas Barfield,  Afghanistan: A Cultural and Political History (Princeton

                        University Press, 2010)

            Ahmad Rashid, Pakistan on the Brink: the Future of America, Pakistan, and

                        Afghanistan (New York: Viking, 2012)

            Farah Ahmedi, The Other Side of the Sky  (New York: Simon Spotlight                                              Entertainment, 2005)

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
15
Course Type: 

Introductory Seminar in South Asia

Post-Mughal Hyderabad
HISA
1501
Undergraduate
Spring
2018

Description: Hyderabad was the largest, wealthiest, longest-lived, and most complex of all Mughal successor states.  After the death in 1748 of its founder, Nizam ul-Mulk, however, as post-Mughal political and economic behaviors became more prominent, a half-century ensued which historians generally have avoided, seemingly unable to bring themselves to undertake close examination of the strategies and rationales which its elites and regimes adopted and proposed.  This is because post-Mughal political and economic behaviors involved the indigenous reactions to European dominance, intrusion, manipulation, and exploitation that marked the beginnings of the British Indian Empire.  Conventional history has regarded this era as a Dark Century, full of rulers with alleged personal failings, and elites who were self-absorbed, dejected, and indecisive. 

                This course examines Hyderabad’s history in the round, including not only its political and economic, but its cultural, intellectual, environmental, gender, and religious aspects.   Comprehensively treating the context of Mughal fragmentation, European competition for commercial and political dominance, and military threats from surrounding regional powers, we attempt not only to locate beginnings of modernity and their effects, but also reasons for its survival as a viable political entity until 1948, the year after Indian independence.  There is a vast literature on Hyderabad, not only in English but in French, Urdu, Persian, Marathi, and Telugu, but enrollees are not required to learn a new language to join the class.

                First-year seminars were originally designed around current faculty’s research projects under way, but very few have been as immediately connected as this, which is the topic of my next monograph.

 

                Requirements:    No exams.  Evaluation will rest on class discussion (40%),  plus three closely-edited and polished essays of two, three, and six typed pages, at intervals (60%).  No late or handwritten papers will be accepted without a truly superb excuse, such as a life-changing emergency.  I will edit and comment intensely, and you will resubmit revised versions of papers two and three. This course satisfies the second writing requirement.

 

                Readings average 75 pp/week.  Besides a photocopy packet, our texts will be chosen from among these:

 

                Karen Leonard, Hyderabad and Hyderabadis (New Delhi: Manohar, 2014)

                Harriet Ronkin Lynton and Mohini Rajan, The Days of the Beloved (Berkeley: U.C. Press, 1974)

                Omar Khalidi, The British Residency in Hyderabad: an Outpost of the Raj (London: PACSA, 2005)

                Narendra Luther, Hyderabad: a Biography (OUP India, 2005)

                Alison Mackenzie Shah, “Constructing a Capital on the Edge of Empire: Urban Patronage and Politics in the                                               Nizams’ Hyderabad, 1750-1950”  unpublished Ph.D. dissertation, U. of Pennsylvania, 2005

                Benjamin Cohen, Kingship and Colonialism in India’s Deccan 1850–1948 (New York: Palgrave, 2007)       

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
15
Course Type: 

Introductory Seminar in South Asia

AFPAK: Civl Soc & Insurgency
HISA
1501
Undergraduate
Fall
2017

Subject and focus:  Two modern nation-states under enormous stress.  Assessing society and politics in Afghanistan and Pakistan will sharpen our historical awareness, help us understand the world's most lasting, urgent, and frustrating confrontation, and polish our writing and debating skills.  No acquaintance with South Asia, or even with history, is assumed.  Readings must be completed before class (see dated headings, below) to maintain and intelligent, active level of discussion and participation.  

Texts:  The following are available at U.Va. Bookstore:

David Pinault, Notes from the Fortune-telling Parrot:  Islam and the Struggle for Religious Pluralism in Pakistan (London:  Equinox, 2008)

Thomas Barfield, Afghanistan:  A Cultural and Political History (Princeton University Press, 2010)

Ahmad Rashid, Pakistan on the Brink:  the Future of American, Pakistan, and Afghanistan (New York: Viking 2012)

Anatol Lieven, Pakistan, a Hard Country (New York:  Perseus, 2011)

Farrah Ahmedi, The other Side of the Sky (New York: Simon Spotlight Entertainment, 2005)

Ahmad Rishad, Taliban.  Buy this online for c. $2.00-copies are plentiful.

N.K. Print and Design (formerly Brillig Books), 7 Elliewood Ave., have photocopied articles, listed below as PHOCO.

Requirements:  No exams.  Evaluation will rest on class discussions (40%), plus three closely-edited and polished essays of two, three, and six typed pages, at intervals (60%).  No late or handwritten papers will be accepted without a truly superb excuse, such as a life-changing emergency.  I will edit and comment intensely, and you will resubmit revised versions of papers two and three.  Standard for all papers: one-inch margins, 12-pt. Geneva, Century Gothic (the most ink-stingy), or Times font, double-spaced, succinct title., pp. numbers (pages 2 and up) in upper-right corners.  AND proper footnotes!  History footnote style templates (not social science or MLA) will soon be handed out.  This course meets the second writing requirement

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
15
Course Type: 

History and Civilization of Classical India

HISA
2001
Undergraduate
Fall
2017

Approach and Focus:   South Asian history and civilization, from the Stone Age up to 1200 CE (Common Era).   No previous exposure, either to India or to history, is assumed.

 

Texts and Assignments: Readings are grouped topically, and subgrouped into required and suggested categories.  The following required texts are/will soon be available at  U.Va. Bookstore:

 

                Burjor Avari, India: the Ancient Past (London: Routledge, 2007)

                Carl Olson, The Different Paths of Buddhism: a Narrative-Historical Introduction

                McClish and Olivelle, eds. & transl., The Arthasastra: Selections from the Classic Indian

                                Work on Statecraft (Indianapolis: Hackett, 2012)

                Barbara S. Miller, tr., The Bhagavad Gita: Krishna’s Counsel in Time of War (various edns.)

                Ainslee Embree,  ed., Sources of Indian Tradition, vol. 1 (revised pb. ed., 1988 and after)

 

                Photocopy packet: purchase at N.K. Print & Design (denoted below as PHOCO).   You will need to go to the library’s reserve desk (4th floor east), for the wonderful, prize-winning Historical Atlas of South Asia), of which there are three copies.  Or see it on line.

 

Requirements:  You may choose one from among three plans:

 

                                Plan I                                       Plan II                                      Plan III

Mid-term    50%                    Map exercise*   20%               Map exercise*       25%

Final           50%                     Mid-term           40%               Mid-term               25%

                                                Final                  40%               10-pp. paper or in-class

                                                                                                                oral  report**          25%

                                                Final                        25%        

*See attached list of items for map exercise

**due last class day in class.    Mid-term and final are based 50-50 on lectures and readings. 

The entire class will vote on exam dates and formats.

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
40
Course Type: 

Introductory Seminar in South Asia

Post-Mughal Hyderabad
HISA
1501
Undergraduate
Spring
2017

  Description: Hyderabad was the largest, wealthiest, longest-lived, and most complex of all Mughal successor states.  After the death in 1748 of its founder, Nizam ul-Mulk, however, as post-Mughal political and economic behaviors became more prominent, a half-century ensued which historians generally have avoided, seemingly unable to bring themselves to undertake close examination of the strategies and rationales which its elites and regimes adopted and proposed.  This is because post-Mughal political and economic behaviors involved the indigenous reactions to European dominance, intrusion, manipulation, and exploitation that marked the beginnings of the British Indian Empire.  Conventional history has regarded this era as a Dark Century, full of rulers with alleged personal failings, and elites who were self-absorbed, dejected, and indecisive. 

                This course examines Hyderabad’s history in the round, including not only its political and economic, but its cultural, intellectual, environmental, gender, and religious aspects.   Comprehensively treating the context of Mughal fragmentation, European competition for commercial and political dominance, and military threats from surrounding regional powers, we attempt not only to locate beginnings of modernity and their effects, but also reasons for its survival as a viable political entity until 1948, the year after Indian independence.  There is a vast literature on Hyderabad, not only in English but in French, Urdu, Persian, Marathi, and Telugu, but enrollees are not required to learn a new language to join the class.

                First-year seminars were originally designed around current faculty’s research projects under way, but very few have been as immediately connected as this, which is the topic of my next monograph.

 

                Requirements:    No exams.  Evaluation will rest on class discussion (40%),  plus three closely-edited and polished essays of two, three, and six typed pages, at intervals (60%).  No late or handwritten papers will be accepted without a truly superb excuse, such as a life-changing emergency.  I will edit and comment intensely, and you will resubmit revised versions of papers two and three. This course satisfies the second writing requirement.

 

                Readings average 75 pp/week.  Besides a photocopy packet, our texts will be chosen from among these:

 

                Karen Leonard, Hyderabad and Hyderabadis (New Delhi: Manohar, 2014)

                Harriet Ronkin Lynton and Mohini Rajan, The Days of the Beloved (Berkeley: U.C. Press, 1974)

                Omar Khalidi, The British Residency in Hyderabad: an Outpost of the Raj (London: PACSA, 2005)

                Narendra Luther, Hyderabad: a Biography (OUP India, 2005)

                Alison Mackenzie Shah, “Constructing a Capital on the Edge of Empire: Urban Patronage and Politics in the                                               Nizams’ Hyderabad, 1750-1950”  unpublished Ph.D. dissertation, U. of Pennsylvania, 2005

                Benjamin Cohen, Kingship and Colonialism in India’s Deccan 1850–1948 (New York: Palgrave, 2007)       

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
15
Course Type: 

Introductory Seminar in South Asia

AFPAK: Insurgency & Civil Society
HISA
1501
Undergraduate
Fall
2016

Subject and focus:  Two modern nation-states under enormous stress.  Assessing society and politics in Afghanistan and Pakistan will sharpen our historical awareness, help us understand the world's most lasting, urgent, and frustrating confrontation, and polish our writing and debating skills.  No acquaintance with South Asia, or even with history, is assumed.  Readings must be completed before class (see dated headings, below) to maintain and intelligent, active level of discussion and participation.  

Texts:  The following are available at U.Va. Bookstore:

David Pinault, Notes from the Fortune-telling Parrot:  Islam and the Struggle for Religious Pluralism in Pakistan (London:  Equinox, 2008)

Thomas Barfield, Afghanistan:  A Cultural and Political History (Princeton University Press, 2010)

Ahmad Rashid, Pakistan on the Brink:  the Future of American, Pakistan, and Afghanistan (New York: Viking 2012)

Anatol Lieven, Pakistan, a Hard Country (New York:  Perseus, 2011)

Farrah Ahmedi, The other Side of the Sky (New York: Simon Spotlight Entertainment, 2005)

Ahmad Rishad, Taliban.  Buy this online for c. $2.00-copies are plentiful.

N.K. Print and Design (formerly Brillig Books), 7 Elliewood Ave., have photocopied articles, listed below as PHOCO.

Requirements:  No exams.  Evaluation will rest on class discussions (40%), plus three closely-edited and polished essays of two, three, and six typed pages, at intervals (60%).  No late or handwritten papers will be accepted without a truly superb excuse, such as a life-changing emergency.  I will edit and comment intensely, and you will resubmit revised versions of papers two and three.  Standard for all papers: one-inch margins, 12-pt. Geneva, Century Gothic (the most ink-stingy), or Times font, double-spaced, succinct title., pp. numbers (pages 2 and up) in upper-right corners.  AND proper footnotes!  History footnote style templates (not social science or MLA) will soon be handed out.  This course meets the second writing requirement. 

Course Instructor: 

History and Civilization of Medieval India

HISA
2002
Fall
2016

Goals of the course:

Ancient India was an Indic Civilization; medieval and modern South Asia was Indo-Islamic.  This course goes beneath the political, cultural, and ethnic warfare of present-day South Asia to discover and assess the growth and development of this Indo-Islamic legacy.  By challenging various communalist, regionalist, and colonial postures, we suggest how Indian, Pakistani, and Bangladeshi publics (and their well-wishers) might revise the ideologically-driven, media exploited, and socially devastating stereotypes of their medieval and early modern pasts.  

Topical Focus:

We cover Medieval Indo-Muslim civilization and political systems from the time Muslims arrived there; to Turkic invasions; the urban revolution 13-14C; major Islamic dynasties, especially the Delhi Sultanate; Indian Sufi mysticism; Bhakti mysticism; the cosmopolitan Vijayanagara Empire; the Mughals; imperial decentralizations; the rise of regional political systems; early Europeans in South Asia; establishment of English domination of the maritime provinces and hegemony over some hinterland states; beginnings of the British Raj.  

Emphasis will be on cultural and intellectual as well as political history, on major ethnic and confessional identities within India, and on the South as well as the North.  Our geographical spread is modern Afghanistan to East Bengal, and Kashmir to Ceylon, with a lecture-discussion format, student participation, audio visual materials, frequent handouts of study aids, and a free-wheeling narrative style. 

Requirements:  You may choose among the three plans below, according to your personal aptitudes;

I) One mid-term 50%   The final exam 50%

2) One map exercise 20%   One mid-term 40%  The final exam 40%

3)  One map exercise 25%  One mid-term 25%  One 10-pp. paper/report 25%  The final exam 25%

Texts and Assignments:  A photocopy packet is available at N & K Print Design on Elliewood Ave.

Catherine B. Asher and Cynthia Talbot, India Before Europe (Cambridge U.P., 2006)

Annemarie Schimmel, The Empire of the Great Mughals (London: Reaktion Books, 2004)

Richard M. Eaton, The Rise of Islam and the Bengal Frontier (Berkeley: U.C. Press, 1993)

 

 

Course Instructor: 

Women and Power in South Asian History

HISA
3121
Undergraduate
Spring
2016

Purpose This course addresses women’s roles and statuses, means of gaining and using power, and contributions in political and other realms, during four millennia of South Asian history. With emphasis on the modern, but with relevant background in Indian mythology, classical history and literature, medieval Islamic chronicles, autobiographies, and eyewitness accounts, we will examine original sources, social science studies, fictional works, and secondary material on the following issues: origins, persistence, and revision of socially and religiously constructed gender identities; typologies of autonomy vs. dependence, security vs. risk, oppression vs. liberation; medieval and modern women as political actors and exemplars; female infanticide, self-immolation of widows, and bride-burning; education, health and workplace; Western and Asian feminisms; and women power brokers in what is now India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Nepal, and Bangladesh. No previous acquaintance with South Asia, or with history, is assumed. Approach & Focus In this course we will read and write about, report on, and discuss topics concerning gender in South Asia, assessing the various ways in which subjects exercised power (or not) and—whether colludingly, unthinkingly, or defiantly—how they defined their roles in history. Requirements Evaluation will rest on class discussion (30%), six-minute presentations on individually-assigned readings (20%), a book review (20%), and three quizzes (30%).

Course Instructor: 
Subscribe to Barnett, Richard

Corcoran Department of History
University of Virginia
Nau Hall - South Lawn
Charlottesville, VA 22904

  

Contact:
(434) 924-7147
(434) 924-7891
M-F 8am to 4:30pm
Department Contacts