Balogh, Brian

Distinguished Majors Program-Special Seminar

HIST
4991
Undergraduate
Spring
2018

HIST 4991, is the distinguished majors seminar for fourth year DMPs completing their theses.  It is a three credit course that meets on Mondays from 6:00 – 8:30.  During the term DMPs draft and revise their honors thesis.  They share and critique draft portions of the thesis and meet regularly with the professor.

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
15
Course Type: 

Distinguished Majors Program-Special Seminar

HIST
4990
Undergraduate
Fall
2017

This course provides a total of six credits for researching and writing the thesis (three in the fall semester and three in the fall semester)  The class meets from four to six times to provide support and assistance in refining the DMP student’s topic and identifying key primary and secondary sources. By early December students will turn in a formal, eight to ten page prospectus of your project.

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
15
Course Type: 

DMP-Special Seminar

HIST
4990
Fall
2016

This course provides a total of six credits for researching and writing the thesis (three in the fall semester and three in the fall semester)  The class meets from four to six times to provide support and assistance in refining the DMP student’s topic and identifying key primary and secondary sources. By early December students will turn in a formal, eight to ten page prospectus of your project.

Course Instructor: 

Distinguished Majors Colloquium

HIST
4890
Undergraduate
Fall
2016

The Distinguished Majors Colloquium is an intensive reading, writing, and discussion course that is restricted to undergraduates who have been accepted into the History Distinguished Majors Program.  http://history.virginia.edu/undergraduate/dmp  The course is intended to familiarize students with the conceptual and methodological approaches that historians commonly employ and to develop analytical and writing skills. Class meets for 2.5 hours each week. Reading amounts to about a book a week.  A two page review of readings will be due each week.  Each student will write a ten page historiographic essay by the end of the semester and will submit a draft of a proposal for research funding related to their honors thesis.

Course Instructor: 

Viewing America, 1940 – 1980

HIUS
3161
Undergraduate
Spring
2016

This course will examine how Americans experienced some of the major events that shaped their lives. We will view what millions of Americans did by watching feature films, news reels, and footage from popular television shows and news broadcasts. We will also read primary and secondary texts that explore among other topics, the domestic impact of World War II, America's reaction to the atomic bomb, the rise of the military-industrial-university complex, the emergence of the Cold War, the culture of anxiety that accompanied it, suburbanization, the "New Class" of experts, the Civil Rights movement, changing gender roles in the work place and at home, the origins and implications of community action and affirmative action, the War in Vietnam, the Great Society, the counterculture, Watergate, the environmental movement, challenges to the authority of expertise, the decline of political parties, structural changes in the economy, the mobilization of interest groups from labor to religious organizations, the emergence of the New Right, challenge to big government, and the role of the electronic media in politics.

I will lecture on Mon and Wed. and discussion sections will meet on Thursdays to review assigned readings, films, and other materials.  There will be a mid-term and final exam, one five to seven page paper and a group project.  You will also be quizzed on the readings at the start of each discussion section.
Readings will average about 125 pages a week.  There will also be a required film each week that can be viewed through on-line subscription services or at the Robertson Media Center.

Course Instructor: 

Introductory Seminar: Making History Public

HIUS
1501
Undergraduate
Spring
2016
This course will examine where history comes from by looking closely at a variety of forms of U.S. history.  We will begin with scholarship – which provides what might be called the “basic research” that a great deal of history ultimately draws upon.  Over the course of the first four weeks, we will read a dissertation, a monograph (the first book that most history professors publish that comes out of the dissertation) and synthetic work by a more senior historian farther on their career, and finally, a book written by a preeminent historian that has broad popular appeal – the kind you might even give to your parents as a birthday gift and they might even read!
 
In the middle portion of the course we will read and view material that draws upon scholarship to teach history and to display history at public sites to an audience (captive and voluntary) that need or wants to learn more about history, and we will read popular history written by non-scholars – often journalists.  In the last portion of the class, we will discuss popular historical films, radio shows, podcasts, historical fiction, video games, and comedy, most likely ending with an episode of Drunk History.  We will invite scholars and public historians to visit the class on occasion, to discuss their work.
 
The overarching question that we will explore over the term is what is lost and what is gained as history is made public?  We will also explore the boundaries between history and fiction, history and social science, and history and popular culture. Throughout, we will seek ways to make authoritative history more accessible.  Students will be required to write an eight hundred word essay every week that responds to a prompt about the reading/viewing assignment.  In addition to these weekly assignments, students will write a ten to fifteen page paper that suggests ways effectively to make history public, or design and produce a project or exhibit that achieves this end.
 
The class will be a discussion class and participation will be highly valued (and rewarded.)  Participation will account for 50 percent of the final grade.  The term paper will count for another 25 percent, and the weekly essays will count for the final 25 percent.
Course Instructor: 
Subscribe to Balogh, Brian

Corcoran Department of History
University of Virginia
Nau Hall - South Lawn
Charlottesville, VA 22904

  

Contact:
(434) 924-7147
(434) 924-7891
M-F 8am to 4:30pm
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