Achilles, Manuela

History and Fiction, Topics

Hitler
HIEU
3505
Undergraduate
Fall
2018

Who was Adolf Hitler and how can we understand the Hitler phenomenon? Was his rise to power an aberrant historical accident or a logical outcome of German history? What was more decisive in shaping the catastrophic course of events under Hitler’s regime: his personality or deep structural historical factors? Would history have turned out better (or worse) if Hitler had been accepted into art school or died in infancy? Do melodramatic depictions of his last days normalize or even trivialize the Holocaust? Is it acceptable to laugh about or even empathize with Hitler today?

This course investigates Hitler’s life and afterlife on the basis of a broad variety of sources. Course materials range from scholarly articles to Nazi propaganda, films, novels, counterfactual histories and Hitler representations on the internet. Throughout this course, we will combine an interest in the personal dimensions of Hitler’s rule with the study of power structures, social interests, aesthetic forms, generational shifts, and national frames. We will pay particular attention to the affective logics and representational regimes that shape our understanding of the past (and present). Requirements include regular attendance, active participation, one oral presentation, and short written assignments. There will be no midterm or final examinations.  

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
15
Course Type: 

Modern German History

HIEU
3352
Undergraduate
Fall
2018

This course explores the multi-faceted history of modern Germany from the founding of the Empire in 1871 to the present. Among the themes that we will study are the repeated radical transformation of Germany’s political structures in the 20th century, the place of war and genocide in German history and memory, as well as the country’s shifting position within Europe and the world. We will also examine some of the major debates in German historiography, such as the idea that the Nazi Third Reich resulted from a flawed pattern of modernization that disconnected economic liberalism from political democracy. Throughout this course, we will pay particular attention to the ruptures and continuities in modern German history, and to the meanings of a traumatic past for the construction of  national identity. Requirements include regular attendance, active participation, two essays, as well as a midterm and final examination.

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
60
Course Type: 
Discussion Sections: 
3

Neighbors and Enemies in Germany

HIEU
3462
Undergraduate
Spring
2018

A biblical injunction, first articulated in Leviticus and then elaborated in the Christian teachings, stipulates that one should love one’s neighbor as oneself. This course explores the friend/enemy nexus in German history, literature and culture. Of particular interest is the figure of the neighbor as both an imagined extension of the self, and as an object of fear or even hatred. We will examine the vulnerability and anxiety generated by Germany’s unstable and shifting territorial borders, as well as the role that fantasies of foreign infiltration played in defining German national identity. We will also investigate the racial and sexual politics manifested in Germany’s real or imagined encounters with various foreign “others.” Most importantly, this course will study the tensions in German history and culture between a chauvinist belief in German racial or cultural superiority and moments of genuine openness to strangers. In the concluding part of this course, we will consider the changing meanings of friendship and hospitality in a globalizing world. Requirements include regular attendance, active participation, one in-class presentation, and three short essays (5 pages each). There will be no mid-term or final examinations. This course fulfills the second writing requirement; no prerequisites.

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
15
Course Type: 

Nazi Germany

HIEU
3390
Undergraduate
Spring
2018

This course examines the historical origins, political structures, cultural dynamics, and everyday practices of the Nazi Third Reich. Requirements include regular attendance, active participation, two five-page essays, mid-term and final examinations. All readings and discussions are in English. No prerequisites. 

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
50
Course Type: 
Discussion Sections: 
3

History and Fiction, Topics

Hitler
HIEU
3505
Undergraduate
Fall
2017

Who was Adolf Hitler and how did he become the genocidal "leader" of a nation that was not unfamiliar with democracy. Was his rise to power an aberrant historical accident or a logical outcome of German history? What was more decisive in shaping the catastrophic course of events under Hitler’s regime: his personality or deep structural historical factors? Would history have turned out better (or worse) if Hitler had been accepted into art school or died in infancy? Do melodramatic depictions of his last days normalize or even trivialize the Holocaust? Is it acceptable to laugh about or even empathize with Hitler today?

 

This course investigates Hitler’s life and afterlife on the basis of a broad variety of sources. Course materials range from scholarly articles to Nazi propaganda, films, novels, counterfactual histories and Hitler representations on the internet. Throughout this course, we will combine an interest in the personal dimensions of Hitler’s rule with the study of power structures, social interests, aesthetic forms, generational shifts, and national frames. We will pay particular attention to the affective logics and representational regimes that shape our understanding of the past. Requirements include regular attendance, active participation, one oral presentation, and short written assignments. There will be no midterm or final examinations.

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
15
Course Type: 

Modern German History

HIEU
3352
Undergraduate
Fall
2017

This course explores the history of modern Germany from the founding of the Empire in 1871 to the present. Among the themes that we will study are the repeated radical transformation of Germany’s political structures, the rise of Hitler and the Nazis, the place of dictatorship, war and genocide in German history and memory, as well as the country’s shifting position within Europe and the world. We will also examine some of the major debates in German historiography, such as the idea that the Nazi Third Reich resulted from a flawed pattern of modernization that disconnected economic liberalism from political democracy. Throughout this course, we will pay particular attention to the ruptures and continuities in modern German history, and to the meanings of a traumatic past for the construction of German national identity. Course requirements include regular attendance, active participation, two essays, and an in-class final examination.

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
60
Course Type: 
Discussion Sections: 
3

Neighbors and Enemies in Germany

HIEU
3462
Undergraduate
Spring
2017

A biblical injunction, first articulated in Leviticus and then elaborated in the Christian teachings, stipulates that one should love one’s neighbor as oneself. This course explores the friend/enemy nexus in German history, literature and culture. Of particular interest is the figure of the neighbor as both an imagined extension of the self, and as an object of fear or even hatred. We will examine the vulnerability and anxiety generated by Germany’s unstable and shifting territorial borders, as well as the role that fantasies of foreign infiltration played in defining German national identity. We will also investigate the racial and sexual politics manifested in Germany’s real or imagined encounters with various foreign “others.” Most importantly, this course will study the tensions in German history and culture between a chauvinist belief in German racial or cultural superiority and moments of genuine openness to strangers. In the concluding part of this course, we will consider the changing meanings of friendship and hospitality in a globalizing world. Requirements include regular attendance, active participation, one in-class presentation, and three short essays (5 pages each). There will be no mid-term or final examinations. This course fulfills the second writing requirement; no prerequisites.

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
15
Course Type: 

Nazi Germany

HIEU
3390
Undergraduate
Spring
2017

This course examines the historical origins, political structures, cultural dynamics, and everyday practices of the Nazi Third Reich. Requirements include regular attendance, active participation, two five-page essays, mid-term and final examinations. All readings and discussions are in English. No prerequisites. 

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
50
Course Type: 
Discussion Sections: 
3

Modern German History

HIEU
3352
Undergraduate
Fall
2016

There are few countries that demonstrate the Janus-face of Western modernity more dramatically than Germany.  Unprecedented scientific, economic and cultural growth went hand in hand with radical social and political polarization.  Democratic pluralism was possible, but so were dictatorship and the most radical exclusion of perceived "others."  This course explores German history from the founding of the German Empire in 1871 to the present.  Among the themes that we will study are the repeated radical transformations of Germany's political structures in the 20th century, the place of war and genocide in German history and memory, as well as the country's shifting position within Europe and the world.  We will also examine some of the major debates in German historiography, such as the idea that the Nazi Third Reich resulted from a flawed pattern of modernization that disconnected economic liberalism from political democracy.  Throughout the course, we will pay particular attention to the ruptures and continuities in modern German history, and to the meanings of a traumatic past for the construction of German national identity and European integration.  Requirements include regular attendance, active participation, two essays, as well as a midterm and final examination.  

Course Instructor: 

Hitler in History and Fiction

HIEU
3559
Undergraduate
Fall
2016

This course investigates and analyzes the representation of Adolf Hitler in history, literature, and film from the 1920's to the present.  Course materials range from archival documents and historical scholarship to popular novels, feature films, counterfactual histories, and Internet websites.  Requirements include regular attendance, active participation, one oral presentation, and three 5-page essays.  Cross-listed with GETR 3559.

Course Instructor: 

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Corcoran Department of History
University of Virginia
Nau Hall - South Lawn
Charlottesville, VA 22904

  

Contact:
(434) 924-7147
(434) 924-7891
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