Seminar

Philosophy and Theory of History

HIEU
5062
Graduate
Fall
2018

Instructor: Allan Megill megill@virginia.edu

Instructor faculty page: http://history.as.virginia.edu/people/adm9e

Academia.edu site: https://virginia.academia.edu/AllanMegill

Questions? E-mail the instructor.

Office Hours: normally Mon-Wed 3:40-4:50 and by arrangement. Best to e-mail me in advance.

 

This class offers an introduction to the currently vibrant field of the philosophy and theory of history, while at the same time giving students the opportunity to write a seminar-type paper with some guidance and supervision from the instructor. The class enrolls qualified third- and fourth-year undergraduates, and graduate students.

 

In the past, the class has attracted students from English, anthropology, sociology, religious studies, East Asian studies, law, and other fields, as well as history. Visiting scholars (graduate students and faculty) from other countries have also attended the class, and their presence has added much to it. Undergraduates often use the class to write a paper that might become part of a senior thesis or serve as a writing sample for graduate school.

 

The paper shall be on a topic discovered by the student and approved after consultation with the instructor, and is to have some relevance to the understanding and representing of past realities or of remnants from the past in the present. However, the aim here is not theory for its own sake. Normally, the paper should derive from and be relevant to students’ own particular interests.

 

Some years ago, I published a book, Historical Knowledge, Historical Error (University of Chicago Press, 2007), dealing with various theoretical issues in history-writing, including such matters as memory, identity, abductive inference, and grand narrative. In my more recent work, I have moved on to other issues that are part of a book manuscript in progress. These issues include popular history, historical remnants, and the relation of history to aesthetics and ethics. Here is a video of a lecture that I gave in Finland in October 2017 that presents one part of these more recent concerns: https://vimeo.com/237531734/d57a929bcf.

 

We shall read various books and quite a few articles. Possible book authors include C. Browning, Collingwood, Bevernage, Confino, N. Z. Davis, Kuukkanen, L. T. Ulrich, and H. White. The “final” book list and syllabus will be determined by sometime in June.

 

Course Requirements in Brief: 1. Do the assigned reading before class. 2. On occasion, write up a brief [500-word] mini-paper and/or write up a discussion summary (“Protokoll”) (I anticipate a six or seven such exercises from each student over the course of the semester). 3. Contribute to discussion, sometimes by “introducing” part of the week’s reading. 4. Write a 20–25 double-spaced pages seminar paper. There will be a very short assignment to be written and submitted prior to the first meeting of the class.

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
15
Course Type: 

Introductory Seminar in Latin American History

Race, Sex, Cold War Latin Amer
HILA
1501
Undergraduate
Fall
2018

HILA 1501 Race, Sex, and the Cold War in Latin America

Tuesdays, 6-8:30

 

Wasn’t the Cold War something the US and the USSR fought over? What does it have to do with Latin America, race, and sex? This class explores how this global conflict was in fact not “cold” at all, as Latin American social movements, revolutionaries, and states fought over the definition of citizenship and political and cultural belonging. Each week, students will read and discuss books and articles that examine the global 1950s to the 1990s from the perspective of Latin America. Topics will include the Cuban Revolution, the global youth rebellions of the 1960s, political violence, human rights movements, and the emergence of feminist, indigenous rights, LGBT rights, and anti-racist movements. We will also be watching movies, listening to music, and exploring art and literature from this period. This is an introductory history seminar where students will read primary and secondary texts and conduct archival research for a project of their choice. There are no exams, but students will be expected to complete semi-weekly reading journals and a final research project of 12-15 pages.

 

Readings may include selections from:

 

Dubinsky, Karen, Catherine Krull, Susan Lord, Sean Mills, and Scott Rutherford, eds. New World Coming: The Sixties and the Shaping of Global Consciousness. Toronto: Between the Lines, 2009.

Joseph, G. M, and Daniela Spenser, eds. In from the Cold: Latin America’s New Encounter with the Cold War. Durham: Duke University Press, 2008.

Green, James Naylor. Beyond Carnival: Male Homosexuality in Twentieth-Century Brazil. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1999.

Chase, Michelle. Revolution within the Revolution: Women and Gender Politics in Cuba, 1952-1962. The University of North Carolina Press, 2015.

Cowan, Benjamin Arthur. “How Machismo Got Its Spurs—in English: Social Science, Cold War Imperialism, and the Ethnicization of Hypermasculinity.” Latin American Research Review 52, no. 4 (October 23, 2017): 606–22.

Hale, Charles R. “Between Che Guevara and the Pachamama: Mestizos, Indians and Identity Politics in the Anti-Quincentenary Campaign.” Critique of Anthropology 14, no. 1 (March 1, 1994): 9–39.

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
15
Course Type: 

Greece in the Fourth Century

HIEU
5031
Graduate
Fall
2018

J. E. Lendon; lendon@virginia.edu.

 

Not for CR/NC.  Prerequisite:  HIEU 2031 or equivalent.

 

This is an advanced course in Greek history that examines the period from the end of the Peloponnesian War in 404 BC to the defeat of the Greek city-states by Macedonia at Chaeronea in 338. 

 

The class will proceed by discussion, and preparation for and participation in each discussion are required.  Readings average ca. 200 pages/week.  Each student can complete the class in one of two ways, with a final exam or by writing a twenty- to twenty-five-page research paper (undergraduates must also submit the paper in draft first); if the paper option is chosen, the course fulfills the second writing requirement for undergraduates and the Seminar requirement for the History major.  In addition there will be a series of exercises on evidence and method due throughout the term.  These requirements will count as follows:

 

           

            discussion/participation.......................................        30%

            four exercises.......................................................       30%

20 to 25-page research paper (undergraduates must submit a rough draft) or final exam....................................................................        40%

 

 

REQUIRED BOOKS

 

Robert B. Strassler, The Landmark Xenophon's Hellenika (Anchor, 2010)
Xenophon, Anabasis (The Persian Expedition, trans. R. Warner; Penguin)

Plutarch, The Age of Alexander (Penguin, 1973; trans. Scott-Kilvert)
P. Harding, From the End of the Peloponnesian War to the Battle of Ipsos (Cambridge,      1985)
J. Ober, Mass and Elite in Classical Athens (Princeton, 1989)
D. Cohen, Law, Sexuality and Society (Cambridge, 1991)
D. Cohen, Law, Violence and Community in Classical Athens (Cambridge, 1995)

Other readings will be made available on the class Collab website.

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
4
Course Type: 

Seminar in Pre-1700 European History

Greece in the 4th Century
HIEU
4501
Undergraduate
Fall
2018

J. E. Lendon; lendon@virginia.edu.

 

Not for CR/NC.  Prerequisite:  HIEU 2031 or equivalent.

 

This is an advanced course in Greek history that examines the period from the end of the Peloponnesian War in 404 BC to the defeat of the Greek city-states by Macedonia at Chaeronea in 338. 

 

The class will proceed by discussion, and preparation for and participation in each discussion are required.  Readings average ca. 200 pages/week.  Each student can complete the class in one of two ways, with a final exam or by writing a twenty- to twenty-five-page research paper (undergraduates must also submit the paper in draft first); if the paper option is chosen, the course fulfills the second writing requirement for undergraduates and the Seminar requirement for the History major.  In addition there will be a series of exercises on evidence and method due throughout the term.  These requirements will count as follows:

 

           

            discussion/participation.......................................        30%

            four exercises.......................................................       30%

20 to 25-page research paper (undergraduates must submit a rough draft) or final exam....................................................................        40%

 

 

REQUIRED BOOKS

 

Robert B. Strassler, The Landmark Xenophon's Hellenika (Anchor, 2010)
Xenophon, Anabasis (The Persian Expedition, trans. R. Warner; Penguin)

Plutarch, The Age of Alexander (Penguin, 1973; trans. Scott-Kilvert)
P. Harding, From the End of the Peloponnesian War to the Battle of Ipsos (Cambridge,      1985)
J. Ober, Mass and Elite in Classical Athens (Princeton, 1989)
D. Cohen, Law, Sexuality and Society (Cambridge, 1991)
D. Cohen, Law, Violence and Community in Classical Athens (Cambridge, 1995)

Other readings will be made available on the class Collab website.

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
15
Course Type: 

Seminar in Pre-1700 European History

Warfare & Society (CE600-1000)
HIEU
4501
Undergraduate
Fall
2018

This class explores the nature of warfare, its place in, and effects upon, the societies of the post-Roman Mediterranean from c. 600 to 1000 CE. These centuries witnessed the terminal phase of the great struggle of Antiquity between Rome and Persia, the emergence of Islam and its profound reshaping of the post-classical world, as well as the formation of numerous ‘barbarian’ successor kingdoms in the west. Topics to be addressed include: military organization, the ideals and realities of battle, the imagery and literature of warfare and martial values, changing technology.

The major work of the course will be a 25-30 page research paper (approximately 7,500 – 8,000 words) using primary sources (in translation) and drawing upon secondary scholarship. Students will also deliver two oral reports (one on their research paper), produce a research bibliography, and be consistently engaged participants in class discussion.

Entry is by Instructor Permission. Students are expected to possess previous class experience in the study of late antique, post-Roman and/or early medieval history (i.e., classes such as HIEU 2061; HIEU 3141; HIEU 5559 ('Early Medieval Mediterranean'); HIME 2001, or equivalent.

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
15
Course Type: 

Nineteenth-Century American Social and Cultural History

HIUS
7658
Graduate
Fall
2018

This readings course surveys modern classics and cutting-edge historiography on the nineteenth century in the United States (especially the period 1830 to 1877), with an emphasis on how social and cultural histories have both promoted inclusiveness and trained our attention on conflict, contingency, experience, identity and language. We will read one monograph per week, supplemented by an occasional article and book review.  The main written assignment is an historiographical essay of 20-25 pages on a topic related to your research interests.  The reading list will be expressly designed to help students with comprehensive exam preparation in US fields.

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
15
Course Type: 

Introductory Seminar in South Asia

AFPAK: Civl Soc & Insurgency
HISA
1501
Undergraduate
Fall
2018

Subject and focus:  Two modern nation-states under enormous stress.  Assessing society and politics in Afghanistan and Pakistan will sharpen our historical awareness, help us understand the world’s most lasting, urgent, and frustrating confrontation, and polish our writing and debating skills.  No acquaintance with South  Asia, or even with history, is assumed   Readings must be completed before class (see dated headings, below) to maintain an intelligent, active level of discussion and participation. 

 

Texts at U.Va. Bookstore:

            Anatol Lieven, Pakistan: a Hard Country (New York: Perseus, 2011)

            Hassan Abbas, The Taliban Revival: Violence and Extremism on the Pakistan

                        Afghanistan Frontier (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2014)

            David Pinault, Notes from the Fortune-telling Parrot: Islam and the Struggle

                        for Religious Pluralism in Pakistan (London: Equinox, 2008)

            Thomas Barfield,  Afghanistan: A Cultural and Political History (Princeton

                        University Press, 2010)

            Ahmad Rashid, Pakistan on the Brink: the Future of America, Pakistan, and

                        Afghanistan (New York: Viking, 2012)

            Farah Ahmedi, The Other Side of the Sky  (New York: Simon Spotlight                                              Entertainment, 2005)

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
15
Course Type: 

Global Legal History

HIST
5130
Graduate
Fall
2018

This course considers European legal regimes as they moved around the globe. It examines those regimes’ interactions with one another and with non-European legal cultures from roughly 1500 to the twentieth century. Themes include: empire formation; conflicting ideas of property; interaction of settler and indigenous peoples; the law of nations and the law of war; and piracy and the law of the sea. Readings may include works by early modern legal thinkers such as Vitoria, Grotius, and Vattel. We will also discuss modern scholarship: e.g. Stuart Banner, Possessing the Pacific; Lauren Benton, A Search for Sovereignty; and Lisa Ford, Settler Sovereignty. We will also read some shorter works concerned with legal history methods. The course will have multiple short writing assignments and a take-home exam. Undergraduates may take this course only by instructor permission.

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
15
Course Type: 

Introductory Seminar in History

History of Economic Life
HIST
1501
Undergraduate
Fall
2018

This course aims to introduce students to the study of economic life - of production, exchange, and consumption in different parts of the world, and at different junctures in history. Through readings from both anthropology, economics, and history, we explore the various social, cultural and political considerations that motivate people to engage in economic activity. And by thinking historically, we situate market-oriented exchange as one of many possible configurations of economic life across space and time. Over the course of the semester, we explore concepts like trade, markets, money, and work, developing a critical analytical toolkit that allows us to think and talk about the multiple logics of exchange in our world today. As in all 1501 courses, there is no expectation of prior knowledge on these topics, and some weeks will be set aside to explore issues in argument-driven writing as well.  However, as it is a seminar, we will primarily devote ourselves to reading (80 pages or so a week) and discussing the material. Students will produce one research paper, divided into several stages over the course of the semester.

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
15
Course Type: 

Introductory Seminar in U.S. History

Civil War Myth and Memory
HIUS
1501
Undergraduate
Fall
2018

In the past year, perhaps no topic of American history has found itself more scrutinized by the lay public and the media more than Confederate monuments. But why is this topic so polarizing? How did we get here? Why does it continue to animate heated debate more than 150 years after the end of the Civil War?

 

In a small seminar setting, this course will examine the memory of the Civil War between 1861 and the present. We will explore Union and Confederate (northern and southern), black and white, male and female interpretations of the war between 1865 and the present. We will focus on how participants of the war understood their own lives, how their descendants and subsequent generations chose to remember the war, and how historians have used these “memories” in crafting contemporary understandings of the Civil War. We will ask such questions as what is memory? Which interpretations of the war were most salient at different times? In what ways were memorialization efforts political? What has been left out of the popular memory of the war? Why?  In order to do so, we will examine such topics as the creation of national cemeteries, art, construction of personal memoirs, monument building, battlefield preservation, veterans’ associations, novels, paintings, and film depictions of the war.

 

This course is primarily reading and discussion based, but there will be two short papers (5-7 pages each) and a class presentation.

 

Readings may include books such as:

Robert Penn Warren, The Legacy of the Civil War

Stephen Crane, The Red Badge of Courage

Tony Horwitz, Confederates in the Attic

Alice Fahs & Joan Waugh, The Memory of the Civil War in American Culture

Thomas Brown, The Public Art of Civil War Commemoration

Michael Shaara, The Killer Angels

Geraldine Brooks, March

 

 

No prior experience studying the American Civil War is expected nor is previous college-level study of history required.

Maximum Enrollment: 
12
Course Type: 

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Corcoran Department of History
University of Virginia
Nau Hall - South Lawn
Charlottesville, VA 22904

  

Contact:
(434) 924-7147
(434) 924-7891
M-F 8am to 4:30pm
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