Lecture

Ancient Greece

HIEU
2031
Undergraduate
Fall
2017

History of Ancient Greece from the Homeric period to the death of Alexander the Great. Development of the city-state, Athenian democracy, and the nature of Greek politics; the conflict between Greece and Persia, and between Sparta and the Athenian naval empire; consequences of the latter conflict--the Peloponnesian War--for subsequent Greek history; finally, the Macedonian conquest of Greece and Persia.

Lecture and weekly discussions; midterm, final, seven-page paper, and occasional quizzes in section. Readings will average between 100 and 125 pages a week, to be taken from the following (students are not responsible--for exam purposes--for the entirety of any of these, although they will have to read all of either Herodotus or Thucydides for the paper):

     The Landmark Herodotus (R. Strassler, ed.; Free Press)

     The Landmark Thucydides (R. Strassler, ed.; Free Press)

     Plutarch, Greek Lives (Oxford)

     Plato, The Apology of Socrates (Hackett)

     J. M. Moore, Aristotle and Xenophon on Democracy and Oligarchy (California)

     S. Pomeroy et al., Ancient Greece (textbook:  edition to be determined)

     a xerox packet (available at NK Print and Design on Elliewood Avenue)

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
120
Course Type: 
Discussion Sections: 
6

The Scientific Revolution, 1450-1700

HIEU
3321
Undergraduate
Fall
2017

This course examines the development of scientific thought and institutions in Western Europe during the critical period from 1450 to 1700 known as the Scientific Revolution.  Because those engaged in scientific pursuits during this period were very consciously reacting to the thought of their predecessors, the course opens with a survey of developments in science—known as natural philosophy—from classical Antiquity through the Middle Ages.  With the reintroduction throughout the early modern period of ancient Greek and Roman texts, natural philosophers both adapted and rejected classical thought in formulating their own interpretations of the phenomena observable in the natural world around them.  As a result of their efforts, “new” versions of “old” approaches emerged, and areas such as astronomy and astrology, chemistry and alchemy, physics and natural magic, coexisted within the accepted body of knowledge of the natural world.  Open to all undergraduates, this course—primarily in the history of ideas—requires no prior training in the sciences or in European history.

Classes will be conducted in a lecture/discussion style.  Students will write one short (5-7-page) paper, a (3-5-page) research prospectus with annotated bibliography, and a (12-15-page) research paper, in addition to taking an in-class midterm and a final examination.  (This course satisfies the Second Writing Requirement.)

Readings will average 100 pages each week and will be drawn from a photocopied packet containing excerpts from the works of such writers as Plato, Aristotle, Ptolemy, Galen, Paracelsus, Bacon, Kepler, Harvey, Galileo, and Newton, as well as from the following required texts:

Dear, Revolutionizing the Sciences
Debus, Man and Nature in the Renaissance
Descartes, Discourse on Method
Lindberg, The Beginnings of Western Science
Galileo, Sidereus Nuncius

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
30
Course Type: 

Virginia History to 1900

HIUS
3281
Undergraduate
Fall
2017

                This three-credit course looks at Virginia's social, political, and economic history from early colonization until the end of the Gilded Age. The class will consider the following broad questions: (1) Why was the rise of an ideology of liberty and equality in Virginia accompanied by the rise of slavery? (2) How did wealthy planters and "common" people alike develop the radical political ideas that led them to revolution? (3) What roles did government play in the state economy? (4) What efforts did Virginians make to rid their state of slavery, and make the electorate as well as legislative representation more democratic, prior to the Civil War? (5) How did Virginians let themselves get drawn into the Civil War? (6) How did some Virginians work toward emancipation of enslaved African-Americans and liberal political reconstruction of the state in the 19th century while others tried to thwart such efforts? The course will devote the first three weeks of the class to the colonial period, and the balance of the semester to a deep-dive into the statehood period 1776-1900.

            Readings will average fewer than 125 pages per week. The principal readings will include: excerpts from Ronald L. Heinemann, et al., Old Dominion/New Commonwealth: A History of Virginia, 1607-2007; portions of Edmund S. Morgan, American Slavery/American Freedom: The Ordeal of Colonial Virginia; Alan Taylor, The Internal Enemy: Slavery and War in Virginia, 1772-1832; William A. Link, Roots of Secession: Slavery and Politics in Antebellum Virginia; and Elizabeth R. Varon, Appomattox: Victory, Defeat and Freedom at the End of the Civil War. (A final syllabus will be available by August 1, 2017.)

            There will be a short-answer mid-term exam and a single-essay final exam. There will be a short (2-3 page) writing exercise early in the semester to acclimate students to writing history based upon primary archival sources, such as those housed in the Special Collections Library. A major portion of each student's final grade will be based a 10-12 page term paper based on original research in primary source documents on a topic of the student's choice. Students will submit multiple drafts of the term paper during the final four weeks of the semester to obtain advice and guidance from the instructor.

            The class will meet twice each week. At each meeting, about an hour will be devoted to lecture and 15 minutes will be devoted to guided class discussions of the readings and other material.

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
60
Course Type: 

The Coming of the Civil War

HIUS
3071
Undergraduate
Fall
2017

Through a close examination of the interrelationships among economic change, cultural and political developments, and the escalating sectional conflict between 1815 and 1861, this lecture course seeks to explain what the caused the outbreak of the American Civil War in April 1861. Students should note that this period also encompasses the Jacksonian era of American history, and most of the lectures in the first half of the course will be devoted to examining it, with a focus on party politics and debates over slavery. Grades will be based on class participation and on three written assignments: a midterm exam; an 8-10 page term paper; and a comprehensive, take-home final examination.

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
120
Course Type: 
Discussion Sections: 
6

History and Civilization of Classical India

HISA
2001
Undergraduate
Fall
2017

Approach and Focus:   South Asian history and civilization, from the Stone Age up to 1200 CE (Common Era).   No previous exposure, either to India or to history, is assumed.

 

Texts and Assignments: Readings are grouped topically, and subgrouped into required and suggested categories.  The following required texts are/will soon be available at  U.Va. Bookstore:

 

                Burjor Avari, India: the Ancient Past (London: Routledge, 2007)

                Carl Olson, The Different Paths of Buddhism: a Narrative-Historical Introduction

                McClish and Olivelle, eds. & transl., The Arthasastra: Selections from the Classic Indian

                                Work on Statecraft (Indianapolis: Hackett, 2012)

                Barbara S. Miller, tr., The Bhagavad Gita: Krishna’s Counsel in Time of War (various edns.)

                Ainslee Embree,  ed., Sources of Indian Tradition, vol. 1 (revised pb. ed., 1988 and after)

 

                Photocopy packet: purchase at N.K. Print & Design (denoted below as PHOCO).   You will need to go to the library’s reserve desk (4th floor east), for the wonderful, prize-winning Historical Atlas of South Asia), of which there are three copies.  Or see it on line.

 

Requirements:  You may choose one from among three plans:

 

                                Plan I                                       Plan II                                      Plan III

Mid-term    50%                    Map exercise*   20%               Map exercise*       25%

Final           50%                     Mid-term           40%               Mid-term               25%

                                                Final                  40%               10-pp. paper or in-class

                                                                                                                oral  report**          25%

                                                Final                        25%        

*See attached list of items for map exercise

**due last class day in class.    Mid-term and final are based 50-50 on lectures and readings. 

The entire class will vote on exam dates and formats.

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
40
Course Type: 

Curating the Past

History of the Museum
HIST
3559
Undergraduate
Fall
2017

            What roles do museums really play in our society?  The answer might surprise you.  This course explores the origins and development of the museum to the present.  It explores museums not as static repositories of artifacts but as carefully designed and curated representations of the past, designed to tell a story.  We will explore how these narratives are created and challenges of public history vs. academic history.  How do you present history to the broader public?  What are the controversies and pitfalls encountered?

            We will explore these issues through case studies, readings, tours of museums, and behind the scenes conversations with museum professionals.  Assignments will include readings, quizzes, short papers, and an exhibit project.  This course will be smaller discussion based one with a max capacity of 25.

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
25
Course Type: 

History of Antisemitism

HIEU
3559
Undergraduate
Fall
2017

            This course will examine the history of antisemitism, prejudice against Jews.  This particular form of bigotry has a long and complex history and unfortunately is still alive and well in nations around the world to include the United States.  Hatred of Jews originates from a diverse combination of ideologies, historical moments and, likewise, takes a variety of forms in different times and places.  This course will introduce the concept from its earliest times and follow both the theoretical/philosophical thought and the very real displays and repercussions of antisemitism through history with a focus on Europe.  We will also closely examine the phenomenon of Holocaust Denial and the resurgence of antisemitism in Europe.

            Readings will be varied, including primary source material, articles, secondary books, and contemporary media.  Assignments include quizzes, short papers, and a research project.

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
40
Course Type: 

African Environmental History

HIAF
3112
Undergraduate
Instructor: 
James D. La Fleur
Spring
2017

This discussion- and writing-intensive course explores how Africans changed their interactions with the physical environments they inhabited and how the landscapes they helped create in turn shaped human history.  Topics covered include the ancient agricultural revolution, the “Columbian exchange” of plants and animals amid slave trading, colonial-era mining and commodity farming, 20th-century wildlife conservation, and the emergent challenges of land ownership, infectious disease, and climate change.

 

Experience studying Africa and/or any of the course themes is welcomed but not required.  The course’s focus is on Africa, but the issues are global and comparative, and therefore course learning is applicable to other places.

 

The course uses a broad topic to provide opportunities to learn and improve skills – in research, analysis, written and oral communication, as well as project management – broadly applicable to success at the University and beyond.  As a course in History, it emphasizes how people (and not just scholars) interested in the past think and how historians do their work with never-straightforward sources (or “evidence”).  To these ends, participants will learn through doing.  Students will identify research interests and possible resources in the early weeks of the course, and then develop their writing through a series of successive stages, including: topic declaration, working bibliography, two-page prospectus, rough draft, and ultimately a final draft of approximately 18 pages.  This progressive architecture is supported through continual feedback from the instructor and from peers designated as “writing partners.”  Class meetings are opportunities to share, collaborate, negotiate, speak in public, and generally enjoy a collegial and intellectually stimulating atmosphere.

 

In recent iterations of the course (as a first-year seminar, as a major seminar, as a lecture and discussion course) students have pursued a wide range of research topics, including:  forest clearance and erosion in Lesotho, mining of coltan (a mineral insulator used in your cellphone) as a contributor to sexual violence in Central Africa, the complicated sources for the earliest camels in northern Africa, (male) circumcision as response to the HIV pandemic, crop changes and childhood malnutrition during the Atlantic slave trade, the role of ecological decline in the rise of Saharan-edge terrorist groups, lung diseases suffered by South African miners, conflict diamonds and “blood oil” from West Africa, conservation and “canned” safari hunts, and many more topics driven by individual student interest.

 

This course fulfills the College’s requirements in “historical studies” and “non-Western perspectives.”   History majors may use HIAF 3112 as a “non-Western” course for their undergraduate program.

 

 

Maximum Enrollment: 
30
Course Type: 

Black Fire

HIUS
3654
Undergraduate
Spring
2017

If you were rating the racial climate at the University of Virginia on a scale of 1-10, what score would you give the University?  Does the idea of a "post-racial society" hold true when we examine the complex nature of social and cultural life at UVA?  How and to what degree have the individual and collective experiences of African American undergraduates transformed since the late 1960's?  Is there still a need for the Black Student Alliance, the Office of African American Affairs, and the Office of Diversity and Equity?  Is Black Studies still an intellectual necessity in the 21st century academy?   Have these entities been successful in bringing about meaningful change in the experiences of underrepresented minorities at UVA?  And if not, how can future efforts to make the University a more equitable democratic institution benefit from a critical engagement with past struggles for social justice and racial equality?

To facilitate critical thinking and exchange on these and other important questions, this course grounds contemporary debates on the state of race relations at UVA within the larger, historical context of the "black Wahoo" experience.  In addition to exploring contemporary issues affecting academic, cultural, and social life on grounds, our classroom and online activities draw attention to an important yet insufficiently explored chapter in the history of "Jefferson's University" by examining the varied ways in which various student-led movements have transformed the intellectual culture and social fabric of everyday life at the University.  How those transformations continue to shape our experiences on grounds will be a topic of frequent discussions.  Over the course of the semester students will explore a wide range of topics, including but not restricted to: black-white student relations, affirmative action, African American Greek life, the black student athlete, the racial politics of major selection, the living wage as both a class and a race issue, the black arts and hip-hop scene on grounds, and ethnic coalitions and conflict between African American, African, and American African students. 

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
100
Course Type: 

The British Economy Since 1850

HIEU
5352
Spring
2017

This course will examine the economic history of Britain from 1850 to present.  Topics will include the relative decline of Britain in the late 19th century, the impact of the World Wars on British economic performance, the origins and impact of the Great Depression, and the economic consequences of Mrs. Thatcher. 

Undergraduates may also take this class for 4501 credit after prior discussion with the instructor.

 

 

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
10
Course Type: 

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Corcoran Department of History
University of Virginia
Nau Hall - South Lawn
Charlottesville, VA 22904

  

Contact:
(434) 924-7147
(434) 924-7891
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