Lecture

Colloquium in Post-1700 European History

Era of the World Wars, 1914-1945
HIEU
4512
Undergraduate
Spring
2017

A study of the major countries of Europe in the era of the  two world wars (1914-1945), with special attention to international relations, and political, economic, and social developments.  The course will emphasize Germany, France, and England, but can accommodate other interests as well.  Most suitable for third- and fourth- year students with some background in modern history as well as graduate students.  There will be weekly meetings to discuss readings, but no final exam.  One student will lead off discussion each week.  Students signing up for HIEU 5312 will in most cases write a bibliographical paper covering their readings during the term.  Students seeking credit for  HIEU 4501 and needing to satisfy the second writing requirement will have to produce three short papers on subjects of their choice.

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
6
Course Type: 

Era of the World Wars, 1914-1945

HIEU
5312
Graduate
Spring
2017

A study of the major countries of Europe in the era of the  two world wars (1914-1945), with special attention to international relations, and political, economic, and social developments.  The course will emphasize Germany, France, and England, but can accommodate other interests as well.  Most suitable for third- and fourth- year students with some background in modern history as well as graduate students.  There will be weekly meetings to discuss readings, but no final exam.  One student will lead off discussion each week.  Students signing up for HIEU 5312 will in most cases write a bibliographical paper covering their readings during the term.  Students seeking credit for  HIEU 4501 and needing to satisfy the second writing requirement will have to produce three short papers on subjects of their choice.

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
6
Course Type: 

Anglo-Saxon England

HIEU
3141
Undergraduate
Spring
2017

This course traces the social, political and cultural history of early England and its Celtic neighbours across seven hundred years, from the departure of the Roman legions in the late fourth century through to England’s two conquests in the eleventh century, firstly by Knutr (Canute) of Denmark in 1016, and - more famously - that by the Norman Duke William 'the Bastard' in 1066. The centuries between these two dates witnessed rich cultural and political developments, and the emergence, in the form of Old English, of one of Europe’s most extensive post-Roman vernacular literatures.

 

Subjects addressed by this class include: the gradual emergence of the early Anglo-Saxon kingdoms from the post-Roman ‘Dark Ages’ of AD 400-600; the rise of several dominant kingdoms in the course of the seventh and eighth centuries, notably Mercia and Wessex; Anglo-Saxon belief; the historical writings of Bede; the reign of Alfred ‘the Great’; the Viking wars; the gradual emergence of a unified English state over the course of the later ninth and tenth centuries and its eventual conquest; varieties of Anglo-Saxon culture; manuscript production; social organization; law and dispute settlement; issues of trade and England's contacts with the wider world.

 

Students will write two essays of 2000 words. There will be two lectures and a discussion section each week, a mid-term and a final exam. This class cannot be taken for C/NC.

 

In addition to a course pack of readings set texts will include:

 

Bede. Ecclesiastical History of the English Church and People, translated by R. Collins and J. McClure (Oxford University Press, 2000).

 

Asser's Life of Alfred and Other Contemporary Sources, translated by S. D. Keynes & M. Lapidge (Penguin, 1984).

 

The Anglo-Saxon World. An Anthology, edited and translated by K. Crossley-Holland (Oxford, 1999).

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
60
Course Type: 
Discussion Sections: 
3

Evolution of the International System, 1815-1950

HIEU
3752
Undergraduate
Spring
2017

Analyzes the evolution of great-power politics as well as internal economic relations from the post-Napoleonic Congress of Vienna and the systems of Metternich and Bismarck to the great convulsions of the twentieth century and the Russo-American Cold War after World War II.  

Includes two weekly lectures with occasional discussion plus weekly reading. Requires one eight-page paper comparing two scholarly books read during the term and one final examination  consisting mostly of essays with some short answers.  For students who wish to sit for a voluntary take-home midterm, the instructor will offer one.

 

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
40
Course Type: 

The Emergence of Modern Britain, 1688-2000

HIEU
2112
Undergraduate
Spring
2017

Why does Britain — an island, an empire, a multinational state, and a laboratory of modern life — loom so large in world history?  This course explores the astonishing transformations of British society since 1688: from the state-building and overseas expansion of the Georgian years; through the urbanization, inequality, and increasingly assertive imperialism of the Victorian era; and finally to the ruptures of two world wars, the end of empire, and the decline of industry in the twentieth century.  Themes include the evolving meanings of “Britishness,” the ambiguities of liberalism, the complexities of class, and the impact of imperial rule at home.  We consider the lives of ordinary servants, soldiers, and workers alongside iconic figures like Queen Victoria, Charles Darwin, and Winston Churchill; we also draw on a wide range of primary sources, from diaries, paintings, and films to classic texts by Edmund Burke, Vera Brittain, and George Orwell.

 

Weekly reading load varies around an average of 150 pages.  Other requirements include an in-class midterm exam; two papers which involve the “close reading” of a primary source; and an in-class final exam.  

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
60
Course Type: 
Discussion Sections: 
3

Maps in World History

HIST
2212
Undergraduate
Spring
2017

The map is a fundamental artifact of human culture.  It documents how people understand the spaces in which they live, the relationship between nature and society, and the shape of the surrounding world.  This course offers an interdisciplinary introduction to the history of cartography that ranges across the globe from the oldest surviving images of space and place to GIS systems.  Anchored by an interactive digital atlas of 100 core maps, our course approaches mapping from a variety of perspectives, including the history of science, art history, the psychology of wayfinding, and the history of empire.  Readings include Jerry Brotton’s A History of the World in 12 Maps, excerpts from the landmark History of Cartography series, and a number of innovative online visualizations of maps, data, and geography.

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
60
Course Type: 
Discussion Sections: 
3

New Course in European History

Nationalism in Europe
HIEU
2559
Undergraduate
Spring
2017

This course explores the meaning of nationalism in Europe, from the UK’s Acts of Union in 1707 to the EU's crisis today. We will consider the development of modern nation-states; unification movements in the nineteenth century; nationalist fervor and the collapse of empires; minority rights and ethnic expulsions in the twentieth century; the rise of the European Union and the rebirth of separatism in the present day. By drawing on both primary and secondary sources, we will try to understand how the nation became the preeminent political form of modern Europe, and how it may continue to shape the continent in the future. 

Readings average about 100 pages a week. Assignments include an in-class midterm exam, an in-class final exam, and two 4-6 page papers. We will divide our time in class between lecture and discussion.     

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
40
Course Type: 

Marx

HIEU
3812
Undergraduate
Spring
2017

Marx (I am tempted to say “the unknown Marx”) remains one of the greatest philosophers of the nineteenth century and of the modern world more generally. He is one of a small group of modern philosophers whose work repays sustained and detailed attention, although he is almost never studied in philosophy departments. He is also, arguably, the most rigorous and consistent social thinker who ever lived. It is worth devoting an entire semester to his thought, not least because doing so will give you some insight into how to think. Finally, in some important respects Marx was right about capitalism (and in other respects wrong).

This course carefully surveys Marx's social and economic thought, with special attention to its philosophical underpinnings. Accordingly, we shall devote a bit more than half the semester to his highly interesting early writings, those he wrote up to late 1844 (the year he turned 26). In the final third of the semester we look selectively at Capital, vol. 1.

The main emphasis is on seeing what Marx’s theory was and on how and why he arrived at it. Marx vehemently denied that he was a Marxist, and students in the class will be surprised to find how far so-called “Marxism” is from Marx’s own thinking. By the end of the semester you will be able to say that you actually know what Marx’s theory was. Many people who claim to know what Marx held actually don’t. This includes many academics.

The course presupposes no prior knowledge of the subject, but it does require the ability to read and think carefully, as well as commitment to keeping up with the reading. There is no specific prerequisite, although it may help to have already taken a basic course in political theory or philosophy. But chemistry or engineering would do just as well, at least if you are not too uncomfortable with reading and writing.

Requirements: do the reading ON TIME; 9-10 short "think questions," to be done ON TIME; midterm test; synthesizing term paper (based on the course reading only, to be handed in ON TIME); final exam.

Books: Marx, Early Writings (Penguin or Vintage [introduction by Lucio Colletti]); Marx and Engels, Marx-Engels Reader, 2nd ed. (Norton); Marx, Capital, vol. 1 (Penguin or Vintage [introduction by Ernest Mandel]); Megill, Karl Marx: The Burden of Reason (Rowman & Littlefield). These specific books are required. Often they can be obtained on-line, second-hand, at lower cost. Do not try to substitute other books for these, and do not rely on Kindle or other non-paper editions.

There is also a small amount of in-copyright material to be downloaded from COLLAB and printed off by students for their individual use.

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
65
Course Type: 

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Corcoran Department of History
University of Virginia
Nau Hall - South Lawn
Charlottesville, VA 22904

  

Contact:
(434) 924-7147
(434) 924-7891
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