Lecture

Black Fire

HIUS
3654
Undergraduate
Spring
2017

If you were rating the racial climate at the University of Virginia on a scale of 1-10, what score would you give the University?  Does the idea of a "post-racial society" hold true when we examine the complex nature of social and cultural life at UVA?  How and to what degree have the individual and collective experiences of African American undergraduates transformed since the late 1960's?  Is there still a need for the Black Student Alliance, the Office of African American Affairs, and the Office of Diversity and Equity?  Is Black Studies still an intellectual necessity in the 21st century academy?   Have these entities been successful in bringing about meaningful change in the experiences of underrepresented minorities at UVA?  And if not, how can future efforts to make the University a more equitable democratic institution benefit from a critical engagement with past struggles for social justice and racial equality?

To facilitate critical thinking and exchange on these and other important questions, this course grounds contemporary debates on the state of race relations at UVA within the larger, historical context of the "black Wahoo" experience.  In addition to exploring contemporary issues affecting academic, cultural, and social life on grounds, our classroom and online activities draw attention to an important yet insufficiently explored chapter in the history of "Jefferson's University" by examining the varied ways in which various student-led movements have transformed the intellectual culture and social fabric of everyday life at the University.  How those transformations continue to shape our experiences on grounds will be a topic of frequent discussions.  Over the course of the semester students will explore a wide range of topics, including but not restricted to: black-white student relations, affirmative action, African American Greek life, the black student athlete, the racial politics of major selection, the living wage as both a class and a race issue, the black arts and hip-hop scene on grounds, and ethnic coalitions and conflict between African American, African, and American African students. 

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
100
Course Type: 

The British Economy Since 1850

HIEU
5352
Spring
2017

This course will examine the economic history of Britain from 1850 to present.  Topics will include the relative decline of Britain in the late 19th century, the impact of the World Wars on British economic performance, the origins and impact of the Great Depression, and the economic consequences of Mrs. Thatcher. 

Undergraduates may also take this class for 4501 credit after prior discussion with the instructor.

 

 

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
10
Course Type: 

American Business

HIUS
3411
Undergraduate
Spring
2017

This course examines the history of the American business enterprise from the workshop to the multinational corporation.  We will explore the economic, legal and political factors that have helped to shape the business organization.  Specific topics to be addressed include:  relations between government and business; law and the rise of Big Business; the changing role of the entrepreneur; the developments of 'scientific management'; the reputation of businessmen as corporations expanded; the factors behind the rise of the multinational corporation; the importance of the individual(e.g Whitney, Ford, Sloan, Rockefeller, Carnegie, DuPont, etc) in developing business practices.

Students may find it to their advantage to have some background in American economic history (HIUS 2006) or economics; there are however, no prerequisites.  

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
120
Course Type: 

New Course in General History

Indian Ocean history
HIST
2559
Undergraduate
Spring
2017

The course is designed to introduce the Indian Ocean as a region linking the Middle East, East Africa, South and Southeast Asia. With a focus on both continuities and rupture, we study select cultures and societies brought into contact through trade, migration. and travel across the Indian Ocean over a broad arc of history. We explore how nobles, merchants, soldiers, statesmen, sailors, laborers, scholars, and slaves engaged in different types of mobility, and how their actions led to the forging of a shared world, from the early period until the present. By building a world-historical narrative that connects Asia, Africa, and the Middle East, we will be able to historicize many of the phenomena that we associate with “globalization” in the world today.

Rather than a comprehensive overview, this course provides a general set of conceptual and analytic tools for understanding empires, migrations, and adaptations across temporal and spatial bounds. At the heart of the course is a challenge to traditional area studies boundaries by thinking about actors, institutions, and historical processes that traverse those boundaries and create altogether new geographies. Using an array of different primary sources, we look at particular case studies and their broader social and cultural contexts

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
40
Course Type: 

Twentieth-Century South Asia

HISA
3003
Undergraduate
Spring
2017

In 2017, India will celebrate 70 years of independence. This course covers the leading social and political developments and dynamics of this largest democracy on earth over the course of its entire post-independence history. Specifically, after tracing the country's formation in the anti-imperialist struggle of 1918-1947, the course will address the consolidation of democracy in the country's early decades under the leadership of Jawaharlal Nehru and his Congress Party; it will then move on to discuss the emergence of the current political landscape beginning in the 1970s. 

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
40
Course Type: 

Russia as Multi-Ethnic Empire

HIEU
3702
Undergraduate
Spring
2017

The Russian/Soviet empire  -- or “Eurasia” as it has often been called -- at the height of its power occupied one-sixth of the world’s land mass and contained a stunning variety of ethnic, religious, and linguistic groups.  Until recently, however, this diversity was largely overlooked in the study and teaching of Russian history in the U.S.  This survey of the multi-cultural complexion of Russia from the 16th century to the present will provide students with both an understanding of the many peoples of Eurasia and the history of relations among these peoples.  We will begin with the history of Russian imperial conquests and the development of the Russians as an ethno-national entity, and then proceed by particular regions and minority communities, describing the experiences and evolving consciousness of each in the tsarist period.  When we get to the 20th century we will shift to a wider lens in discussing fluctuations in official administrative approaches to empire, the role of ethnic diversity in the dissolution of the USSR, and emergent identity issues both within the present-day Russian Federation and the broader former empire.  The course will have an interdisciplinary flavor, reflecting recent schoarship not only of historians but also of literary scholars, anthropologists, political scientists, journalists, and others. 

 

Topics of lecture and readings will include:   the Polish independence movement; Russian orientalism and policies toward Muslims; anti-Semitism, the Pale of Jewish Settlement, and pogroms; the question of Ukrainian distinctiveness; the role of Germans in Russia and the backlash against them during World War I; the “civilizing mission” and unveiling of Muslim women in Central Asia; Soviet “affirmative action” policies; the ethnic Russian diaspora in the “near abroad”; wars in the Caucasus (Chechnya and Georgia-Ossetia) in both the 19th century and the present; and racial attitudes in present-day Russia.  An array of primary sources -- memoirs, government documents, poetry, stories, films, and ethnographies – will give students access to the voices and experiences of Russians as well as minority groups.

 

There will be two 75-minute classes per week, combining lecture and discussion.  A few weeks into the semester, each student will be assigned a particular ethnic group or region to research and represent in greater depth.  This will generate three graded exercises:  an in-class roll-playing exercise; an ethnographic report; and a portfolio of recommended resources on the group that will take the place of a final exam.  Grades will also include two non-cumulative take-home midterms. 

 

Assigned secondary readings will include Andreas Kappeler, The Russian Empire: A Multi-Ethnic History; Yohanan Petrovsky-Shtern, The Golden Age Shtetl:  A New History of Jewish Life in Eastern Europe; and Francine Hirsch, Empire of Nations: Ethnographic Knowledge and the Making of the Soviet Union.  Basic knowledge of European, Russian, or Asian history is helpful but by no means required.

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
25
Course Type: 

Modern African History

HIAF
2002
Undergraduate
Spring
2017

Modern African History, explores the history of Africa from the decline of the Atlantic slave trade, in the early nineteenth century, to the present.  Our goal is to examine the historical roots of the continent's present condition.  We will look at the slave trade and its consequences, the growth of African states, the spread of Islam, the European conquest of most of the African continent, African responses to colonial rule, and the reestablishment of African independence.

 

We will concentrate on three regions:  West Africa, especially Nigeria; Central Africa, especially Congo and Rwanda; Ethiopia, in northeast Africa; and southern Africa, with an emphasis on South Africa.  We will pay particular attention to the ways in which colonialism affected ordinary Africans and to the strategies that Africans employed to resist, subvert, and accommodate European domination.

 

We will especially be interested in the ways that Africans used photography -- a new and powerful expressive tool in the 19th and 20th centuries -- to define themselves.  We will also look at the ways in which the attitudes of the colonizers was reflected in the photos that they made of Africans.

 

HIAF 2002 is an introductory course and assumes no prior knowledge of African history.

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
60
Course Type: 
Discussion Sections: 
3

History of Russia Since 1917

HIEU
2162
Undergraduate
Spring
2017

This is an introductory survey of the history of Russia (broadly defined) from 1917 to the present.  Briefly, our goal in the course is to explore the rise and fall of a distinct form of civilization -- a polity, society, culture and empire -- known as “Soviet Communism.”  Why did that “civilization” arise in Russia, and what is “Russia” now that Soviet Communism is dead?  To answer these questions, lectures and readings will focus on the social and cultural as well as the political history of the region.  Major topics include:  the revolutions of 1917; the Russian Civil War; Lenin’s New Economic Policy; Stalinism; the Great Fatherland War and post-war reconstruction; the origins and phases of the Cold War; de-Stalinization and the limits of reform (Khrushchev to Gorbachev); varieties of Communism within Europe and beyond; the quest for stability and the crisis of late Communism (the Brezhnev years); the disintegration of the USSR and the emergence of the Russian Federation and other successor states; and post-Soviet Russia’s transition to oligarch/crony capitalism and “sovereign democracy” (Yeltsin to Putin).

 

The course assumes no prior training in Russian history.  Requirements include active participation in weekly discussion sections, a midterm exam, a final exam and three 600-word papers on required course readings.  Readings (in English) of about 150 pages per week will include primary and secondary sources. Assigned texts include:  Lydia Chukovskaya, Sofia Petrovna; Friedrich Engels & Karl Marx, The Communist Manifesto; Alexander Solzhenitsyn, One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich; and Ronald Suny, The Soviet Experiment. Two required class packets will be available for purchase at N.K Print & Design on Elliewood Avenue.

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
120
Course Type: 
Discussion Sections: 
6

History of Virginia Since 1865

HIUS
3282
Undergraduate
Spring
2017

            History is the study of change over time.  This course will examine change in Virginia from about 1865 to the present.  The course will consider four issues: (a) which groups have tried to empower which Virginians, at what times and utilizing which strategies, and which groups have tried to disempower which Virginians; (b) how have Virginians used racism to weave the political, social, moral, and economic fabric of modern Virginia; (c) the role of sovereign debt and the resolution of the conflict between Funders and Readjusters in constructing Virginia’s “pay-as-you-go” philosophy; (d) in which respects were the changes in the political, economic, social and racial landscapes of Virginia during the sixty years following the Civil War similar to such changes in the sixty years following World War II?

 

            Readings will average approximately 120 pages per week, and will be drawn from both primary documents and secondary material.  Among the readings will be selections from Ronald L. Heinemann et al., Old Dominion/New Commonwealth: A History of Virginia, 1607-2007;as well as: Elizabeth R. Varon, Appomattox: Victory, Defeat, and Freedom at the End of the Civil War; Jane Dailey, Before Jim Crow: The Politics of Race in Postemancipation Virginia; and J. Douglas Smith, Managing White Supremacy: Race, Politics and Citizenship in Jim Crow Virginia. The class meets twice per week.  Approximately 2/3 of each class will be spent in lecture and 1/3 in guided class discussion. There will be a short essay, a short-answer mid-term exam, one 8-10 page paper based upon the student’s original research in primary source materials, and an essay-type final examination.

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
60
Course Type: 

New Course in History

20th C Global History
HIST
7559
Graduate
Spring
2017

This seminar is designed to introduce you to methods and approaches that scholars are using to write histories that cut across national boundaries. Our readings will sample recent scholarship on a wide array of topics, including empire, decolonization, race, human rights and humanitarianism, the cold war, environmental history and public health, international organizations, war and refugees, and a number of other topics. The emphasis is on diversity of method and material, in hopes of inspiring Ph.D. students to think beyond the nation-state. The seminar will feature 5 or 6 current U.Va. faculty members who will come to speak about their own work.

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
12
Course Type: 

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Corcoran Department of History
University of Virginia
Nau Hall - South Lawn
Charlottesville, VA 22904

  

Contact:
(434) 924-7147
(434) 924-7891
M-F 8am to 4:30pm
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