Lecture

Modern Jewish History

HIEU
2102
Undergraduate
Spring
2017

This course examines modern Jewish history from the sixteenth century to the present, focusing on the political, social, religious, and cultural transformations of Jewish life and identity around the world. Major topics to be discussed will include political emancipation and the Hebrew Enlightenment, Zionism and modern Jewish political movements, antisemitism and the Holocaust, the divergent paths of American and European Jewries, and post-World War II relations between global Jewry and the State of Israel. This is an introductory course that assumes no prior knowledge of Judaism or Jewish history.

 

The main textbook for this course will likely be Howard Morley Sachar’s A History of the Jews in the Modern World. This will be supplemented with a variety of other scholarly articles and an extensive array of primary sources drawn chiefly from Paul Mendes-Flohr and Jehuda Reinharz’s source book, The Jew in the Modern World: A Documentary History. Requirements will likely include three short papers in response to primary sources; a midterm exam; a final exam; and participation in in-class discussion sections. HIEU 2102 follows HIEU 2101, Jewish History II: The Ancient and Medieval Experience, though the two may be taken independently.

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
40
Course Type: 

The Civil War and Reconstruction

HIUS
3072
Undergraduate
Spring
2017

This course explores the era of the American Civil War with emphasis on the period 1861-1865. It combines lectures, readings, films, and class discussion to address such questions as why the war came, why the North won (or the Confederacy lost), how the war affected various elements of society, what was left unresolved at the end of the fighting, and how subsequent generations of Americans understood the conflict's meanings. Although this is not a course on Civil War battles and generals, about 50 per cent of the time in class will be devoted to military affairs, and we will make a special effort to tie events on the battlefield to life behind the lines.

The course will be organized in two lecture meetings a week. Grades will be based on two geography quizzes (each 5% of the course grade), two take-home examinations (each 35% of the course grade), and a 7-page paper that integrates material from the lectures, readings, and films (20% of the course grade).

 

Note:  This course does not satisfy the second writing requirement.

 

Required Books (some substitutions may be made):

David W. Blight, Frederick Douglass’ Civil War

Robert Bonner, The Soldier’s Pen

Jacqueline G. Campbell, When Sherman Marched North from the Sea

William J. Cooper, ed., Jefferson Davis: The Essential Writings

Andrew Delbanco, ed., The Portable Abraham Lincoln

Charles B. Dew, Apostles of Disunion

Gary W. Gallagher, Becoming Confederates

Gary W. Gallagher and Joan Waugh, The American War

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
40
Course Type: 

Supernatural Europe, 1500-1800

HIEU
2721
Undergraduate
Spring
2017

Today, witchcraft and vampires are the stuff of hit movies and bestselling novels.  Five centuries ago, however, few Europeans questioned that magic was real.  This course reconstructs that enchanted world.  Throughout the semester, we will explore the reasons why early modern Europeans believed in the forces of witches, demons, comets, and more, and what caused these beliefs to change and ultimately recede over time. For example, how did beliefs about demonic activity frame the interpretation of natural disasters? What do rituals surrounding birth and death reveal about the daily lives of ordinary people? And why did Europeans begin to hunt witches in this period, and why did they stop? As we pursue these questions, we will also gain a broader understanding of European society, culture, religion, and science between 1500 and 1800. In order to understand the reasons behind the witch-hunt, for example, we will examine their judicial systems and their views on women. At the same time, this course introduces students to the skills through which historians analyze sources and draw conclusions about the past. In assignments and class discussions based on primary sources, such as first-hand accounts of possession and the records generated by witchcraft trials, we will learn how to practice those skills ourselves. Written work will include short papers (in response to assigned prompts) and two exams (midterm and final). 

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
60
Course Type: 
Discussion Sections: 
3

American History Since 1865

HIUS
2002
Undergraduate
Spring
2017

This course is an interpretive survey of American History covering the fourteen decades since the end of the Civil War.  The main topics are the creation of a huge capitalist market economy, the ascent of the U.S. to world power and engagement in world affairs, and the domestic challenge of keeping a mass society democratic. 

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
60
Course Type: 
Discussion Sections: 
3

Colloquium in African History

Africa in the Global South
HIAF
5559
Graduate
Spring
2017

This colloquium will offer an introduction to the themes, regions, and debates surrounding Africa and the Global South. Topics include the idea of Africa, the place of the African diaspora, and challenges facing post-colonial African states, the causes of economic underdevelopment and political violence, and discourses of "Africa Rising" and Afro-pessimism. This course is interdisciplinary and will be taught in the Global South Humanities Laboratory. The seminar is discussion based, focusing on weekly readings. Students will produce a final paper or project. This course satisfies the undergraduate major Capstone seminar requirement.

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
6
Course Type: 

New Course in European History

Crusades
HIEU
3559
Undergraduate
Spring
2017

This course examines the rise of crusading in the medieval world. Focusing on the first three crusades to the Middle East, we will explore how and why people went on crusade, what their friends and wives thought of their going, and the general reception of crusading in the west. Equally, we will explore the reception of the crusaders in the Middle East, how Muslims and Byzantines understood the influx of westerners and the violence that ensued. The class will be a mix of lecture and discussion, with one research project, one group project, and two short papers.

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
40
Course Type: 

New Course in United States History

American Slavery
HIUS
2559
Undergraduate
Spring
2017

Over four hundred years, twelve million Africans were forcibly transported to the Americas.  Enslaved Africans lived, labored, and died in various regions of the Atlantic world, from Brazil to Barbados, Saint Domingue to Saint Croix.  In this course, students will explore how slavery developed in one region of the Atlantic world, a small group of British colonies that would become the United States of America.  Broadly, students will be introduced to the history of slavery and emancipation in the United States.  Specifically, students will examine the ways in which slavery as an economic, legal, and social institution influenced the lived experiences of people involved, both directly and tangentially, in slavery’s growth and its ultimate contentious demise.  During the semester, we will discuss a variety of topics, including, but not limited to:  the creation of the African Atlantic world, the politics of the American Colonization Society, motherhood in slavery, and the literature of runaway slaves. 

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
40
Course Type: 

From Nomads to Sultans: the Ottoman Empire, 1300-1700

HIME
3192
Undergraduate
Spring
2017

A survey of the history of the Ottoman Empire from its obscure origins around 1300 to 1730, this course explores the political, military, social, and cultural history of this massive, multi-confessional, multi-ethnic, inter-continental empire which, at its height, encompassed Central and Southeastern Europe, the Caucasus, the Middle East, and North Africa. No previous study of history required.

 

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
45
Course Type: 

Modern Latin America

HILA
2002
Undergraduate
Spring
2017

This course examines modern Latin American history from independence to the present.  It focuses on socioeconomic and political changes and on the ways different social actors -peasants, indigenous groups, workers, and women - have confronted and contributed to these changes.  The course covers a number of periods: movements for independence and the early nineteenth century; Liberalism, export-led growth, and the formation of modern nation states;  the Mexican revolution; industrialization, urbanization, and populism; the United States and Cuban revolution; the 1960s, Liberation Theology, and social movements; the crisis of underdevelopment and military regimes; Central American revolutions; and Latin America in the new global order, neoliberal economic restructuring, and transitions to democracy.  The course will consider a number of key questions about the causes of underdevelopment, the roots of authoritarianism, the nature and causes of revolutionary movements, the questi  on of human rights, the problem of social injustice, United States intervention, and the role of the Catholic Church. 

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
120
Course Type: 
Discussion Sections: 
6

Modern Central America

HILA
3051
Undergraduate
Spring
2017

The Lived Experience in 20th Century Central America

How have Central Americans and Americans experienced the twentieth century in Central America?  We will be reading testimonials, memoirs, documentaries and novels to get at the personal experiences of daily life in these deeply conflicted social orders.   We will read them in the following order, together with a synthetic history of Central American countries by John Booth.   I am not asking the bookstore to get them, as you can obtain them all much cheaper on line.  You will write a journal in two installlments, and a final 15 page essay for the course.  No exams. All the books are fantastic, and good reads.   Do not buy the June Erlick book, as I will lend you a copy. 

Omar Cabezas, Fire From the Mountain

Stephen Kinzer, Blood of Brothers:  Life and War in Nicaragua                 

Gioconda Belli, The Country Under My Skin

Stephen Schlesinger, Bitter Fruit:  The Story of the American Coup in Guatemala

June Erlick, Disappeared:  A Journalist Silenced

Rigoberta Menchú, I, Rigoberta Menchú:  An Indian Woman From Guatemala

Francisco Goldman, The Art of Political Murder

María López Vigil, Oscar Romero:  Memories in Mosaic

Ana Carrigan, Salvador Witness

Manlio Argueta, One Day of Life

Mark Danner, The Massacre at El Mozote

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
35
Course Type: 

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Corcoran Department of History
University of Virginia
Nau Hall - South Lawn
Charlottesville, VA 22904

  

Contact:
(434) 924-7147
(434) 924-7891
M-F 8am to 4:30pm
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