Lecture

English Legal History to 1776

HIEU
3471
Undergraduate
Spring
2018

This course surveys English law from the Middle Ages to the 18th century. In class, we will consider how social and political forces transformed law. Because this is a history course, law will be understood more as a variety of social experience and as a manifestation of cultural change than as an autonomous zone of thought and practice. We will look at competition among jurisdictions and the development of the legal profession. We will examine the development of some of the modern categories of legal practice: property, trespass and contracts, and crime. We will conclude by considering what happened to English law as it moved beyond England’s shores. Assignments include two essays (approximately 2000 words each), a midterm, and a final exam.

Students will read an array of court cases, treatises, and other sources from the thirteenth to the eighteenth centuries. These readings are dense and difficult but also fascinating. Most students will only grasp their meaning by paying very close attention to language, reading with a dictionary, and re-reading.

Assigned books may include:

J.H. Baker, An Introduction to English Legal History (4th ed.)


Mary Bilder, The Transatlantic Constitution: Colonial Legal Culture and the Empire

Amy Louise Erickson, Women and Property in Early Modern England


John Langbein, Torture and the Law of Proof: Europe and England in the Ancien Regime

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
30
Course Type: 

Modern Latin America, 1824 to Present

HILA
2002
Undergraduate
Spring
2018

What is a nation? What is progress and how can we measure it? What is the nature of a just society? How can a nation built out of a colonial empire create a such a society? In this course, we seek to answer these questions by exploring the history of Modern Latin America.  In this class, we will examine moments where peoples and governments have sought to make and change the modern world.

 

In Unit I, we will begin by examining the world created by the Independence Wars in Latin America and the Atlantic World. In this period, the new Latin American republics struggled to make liberty, equality, and prosperity possible during a global era of economic imperialism and scientific racism. Using the examples of Venezuela and Argentina, we will explore the problems of integrating diverse populations, generating prosperity, and the promises and pitfalls of democratic participation.

 

In the second unit, we will explore the crises of the late 19th and early 20th centuries using the case studies of Cuban Independence and the Mexican Revolution. We will explore how Afro-Cuban and indigenous Mexican armies demanded full access to social, economic, and political prosperity, and explore how and why these demands were so challenging for elites. In this unit we will also explore how US intervention and foreign capital affected Latin American societies in this period.

 

In the third unit, we will turn to the revolutions and reactions of the twentieth century, emphasizing the role of the Cold War in turning old struggles into new kinds of conflicts. Our two case studies for this period will be Guatemala and Chile. As we explore two would-be revolutions, we will consider issues of gender, sexuality, race, and environmentalism. Studying the reactionary aftermath of revolutions in Guatemala and Chile will also allow us to investigate the role of terror and state violence in creating the neoliberal economic and political order.

 

Requirements for this course include two midterm exams (25% of grade each), and a portfolio of annotated primary sources (25% of your grade) as a final project. The exam format will be closed book short essay, and the portfolio will require using context from lectures, readings, and discussion sections to curate a series of documents provided by the instructor . In addition, attendance and active participation in discussion sections are required and will be 25% of the final grade.

 

Books we will be using for this class include:

Keen’s Latin American Civilization: A Primary Source Reader, Volume 2: The Modern Era (Tenth Edition).

Domingo Sarmiento, Civilization and Barbarism

Ada Ferrer, Insurgent Cuba

Mariano Azuela, The Underdogs

Peter Kornbluh, The Pinochet File: A Declassified Dossier of Atrocity and Accountability

Daniel Wilkerson, Silence on the Mountain:Stories of Terror, Betrayal, and Forgetting in Guatemala

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
60
Course Type: 
Discussion Sections: 
3

History of the Middle East and North Africa, ca 1500-Present

HIME
2002
Undergraduate
Spring
2018

As a continuation of HIME 2001 (which is not a prerequisite), this course surveys the historical evolution of the Middle East and North Africa. We begin with the rise of the Ottoman Empire during the 16th century and continue through the development of the modern nation-state systems of the present century. In the process, we examine issues of state formation, class, gender, race, environment, war, and migration as we explore the evolving relationship between the MENA region and the rest of the world.

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
60
Course Type: 
Discussion Sections: 
3

American History Since 1865

HIUS
2002
Undergraduate
Spring
2018

This course is an interpretive survey of American History covering the fourteen decades since the end of the Civil War.  The main topics are the creation of a huge capitalist market economy, the ascent of the U.S. to world power and engagement in world affairs, and the many challenges of keeping a mass society democratic.  There are two lectures and a discussion section each week.  While a textbook supplies background, documents and iconography selected from primary sources emphasize the diversity of this nation’s past and highlight conflicting viewpoints.  The heart of the class is the students’ engagement with the documents and iconography, in light of the lectures, and active participation in weekly discussions.

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
60
Course Type: 
Discussion Sections: 
3

US Since 1945: People, Politics, Power

HIUS
3171
Undergraduate
Spring
2018

This course examines the history of the US since 1945 with a particular focus on political, social and economic changes. Topics covered include Civil Rights Movements; Cold War domestic politics; interest groups on the right and left; youth culture, counterculture and the sexual revolution; consumer culture; role of corporations in shaping American life; immigration; and the global influence of the American economy. Classes will include a mixture of lecture and discussion. Requirements include response papers, a mid-term and a final examination. Readings average 100 pages per week. 

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
60
Course Type: 

Modern Jewish History

HIEU
2102
Undergraduate
Spring
2018

Jewish civilization is one of the oldest and most influential components of world religion and history. Yet the Jewish people never possessed a large empire and always constituted a tiny minority in numerical terms, even in ancient times. In the modern period, Jews experienced an equally dramatic fate, including two pivotal events at the epicenter of the twentieth century: the unprecedented catastrophe of the Holocaust and the improbable rise of the State of Israel. All along, Jews have repeatedly surfaced at key junctures in the political, intellectual, and cultural moments that define our world.

In this course, we will seek explanations for this unique history through surveying the basic narrative of Jewish history from the sixteenth century to the present. We will focus on the political, social, religious, and cultural transformations of Jewish life and identity around the world. Major topics to be discussed include political emancipation and the Hebrew Enlightenment, Zionism and modern Jewish politics, antisemitism and the Holocaust, the divergent paths of American and European Jewries, and post-World War II relations between global Jewry and the State of Israel. We will also examine how Jewish history relates to modern European, American, and Middle Eastern history.

This is an introductory course that assumes no prior knowledge of Judaism or Jewish history. We will read and critically analyze a variety of primary and secondary sources, including religious, political, and legal writings, artistic images and musical recordings, and scholarly studies. Our goal is to introduce you not only to the study of Jewish history, but also the related academic fields of Jewish Studies, European history, and world history. Equally importantly, we aim to provide you with a concrete sense of the methods and questions that professional historians use to engage the past.

HIEU 2102 follows HIEU 2101, Jewish History I: The Ancient and Medieval Experience, though the two may be taken independently. For history majors, HIEU 2102 satisfies the post-1700 Europe (HIEU) requirement. The course also feels a core requirement for the Jewish Studies major.

            Requirements will include active course participation, two take-home short writing assignments, one short 500-word analytical essay, a midterm exam, and a final exam.

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
60
Course Type: 
Discussion Sections: 
3

New Course in European History

The Holocaust on Film
HIEU
3559
Undergraduate
Spring
2018

This course examines the presentation of the Holocaust on film from the immediate postwar period to present.  It does so alongside the actual history of the Holocaust.  Course involves viewing multiple films inside and outside of class.  This includes original film footage, documentaries, and feature films.  Course assignments include multiple writings and analyses on various topics of filmmaking and the Holocaust.

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
25
Course Type: 

History of Virginia, 1900 to 2018

HIUS
3282
Undergraduate
Spring
2018

 

            History is the study of change over time.  This course will examine change in Virginia from about 1900 to the present. The course will study the creation of the great political machines of the 20th century in Virginia, governmental regulation of race relations, progressive regulatory reform, the eugenics movement, and Virginia’s “massive resistance” to school desegregation. The course will study the making of the modern Republican and Democratic parties in Virginia. The course will consider three major themes: (a) which groups have tried to empower which Virginians, at what times and utilizing which strategies, and which groups have tried to disempower which Virginians; (b) how have Virginians used racism to weave the political, social, moral, and economic fabric of modern Virginia; (c) in which respects were the changes in the political, economic, social and racial landscapes of Virginia during the first 45 years of the 20th century similar to such changes in the years following World War II?

 

            Readings will average approximately 120 pages per week, and will be drawn from both primary documents and secondary material.  Among the readings will be selections from Ronald L. Heinemann et al., Old Dominion/New Commonwealth: A History of Virginia, 1607-2005; J. Douglas Smith, Managing White Supremacy: Race, Politics and Citizenship in Jim Crow Virginia; Matthew D. Lassiter and Andrew B. Lewis, The Moderates’ Dilemma: Massive Resistance to School Desegregation in Virginia; and J. Harvie Wilkinson, III, Harry Byrd and the Changing Face of Virginia Politics, 1845-1966. The class meets twice per week.  Approximately 2/3 of each class will be spent in lecture and 1/3 in guided class discussion. There will be a short answer mid-term exam, two short, 2-3 page papers, one 8-10 page term paper requiring the use of primary source materials, and an essay-type final examination.

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
60
Course Type: 

Arabian Seas: Islam, Trade and Empire in the Mediterranean and Indian Ocean

HIME
3195
Undergraduate
Spring
2018

The course is designed to introduce the Arabian Sea as a region linking the Middle East, East Africa, South and Southeast Asia. With a focus on both continuities and rupture, we study select cultures and societies brought into contact through trade, migration. and travel across the Indian Ocean over a broad arc of history. We explore how nobles, merchants, soldiers, statesmen, sailors, laborers, scholars, and slaves engaged in different types of mobility, and how their actions led to the forging of a shared world, from the early period until the present. By building a world-historical narrative that connects Asia, Africa, and the Middle East, we will be able to historicize many of the phenomena that we associate with “globalization” in the world today, while taking seriously the idea of seas as arenas of history.

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
60
Course Type: 
Discussion Sections: 
3

Roman Republic and Empire

HIEU
2041
Undergraduate
Spring
2018

A survey of the political, social, and institutional growth of the Roman Republic, with close attention given to its downfall and replacement by an imperial form of government; and the subsequent history of that imperial form of government, and of social and economic life in the Roman Empire, up to its own decline and fall.  Readings of ca. 120 pages per week; midterm, final, and one seven-page paper.

Readings will be drawn from the following:

            Sinnegan and Boak, A History of Rome (text)

            Livy, The Early History of Rome

            Plutarch, Makers of Rome

            Suetonius, The Twelve Caesars

            Tacitus, Annals of Imperial Rome

            Apuleius, The Golden Ass

            R. MacMullen, Roman Social Relations

            and a course packet

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
120
Course Type: 
Discussion Sections: 
6

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Corcoran Department of History
University of Virginia
Nau Hall - South Lawn
Charlottesville, VA 22904

  

Contact:
(434) 924-7147
(434) 924-7891
M-F 8am to 4:30pm
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