Lecture

West African History

HIAF
3051
Undergraduate
Fall
2018

This course explores the history of West Africans in the wider context of the global past.  Our course begins in very distant times, and traces currents of change from West Africans’ first attempts to make a living in ancient environments through their subsequent challenges and actions in the eras of the slave trades (domestic, trans-Saharan and Atlantic), colonial overrule by outsiders beginning in the 19th century, political independence in the late 20th century, and ever-increasing globalization to 2018.  Though the course focuses primarily on those people living in the region, we will follow a select few to their new places of residence in the Americas in the era of the Atlantic era and to global capitals and their suburbs in our own lifetimes.

            Experience studying Africa and/or any of the course themes is welcomed. This may include foundational work in HIAF 2001 or HIAF 2002, or achieved through other courses, including those offered in other departments and disciplines, that approach Africa, Africans, and African diasporas. Other students will bring life experiences or intellectual curiosities about the topics and thereby enrich our work.

            The course’s focus is on Africa, but the issues are global and comparative, and therefore course learning is broadly applicable to other places and people.

            HIAF 3051 qualifies for the College of Arts & Sciences graduation requirements in the traditional curriculum in Non-Western Perspectives and Historical Studies; and in the New College Curriculum as Historical Perspectives and Cultures & Societies of the World. History majors may use HIAF 3051 as a “non-Western” course for their undergraduate program.

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
30
Course Type: 

New Course in European History

France in Age Revol 1789-1871
HIEU
2559
Undergraduate
Fall
2018

France in the Age of Revolution, 1789-1871

 

The French Revolution has long been considered a foundational event in modern world history. But 1789 was only the beginning of France’s long revolutionary experience. From the outbreak of revolution in the summer of 1789 to the end of the bloody Paris Commune in May 1871, the French brought about at least four revolutionary changes of government. In this course, we will explore why this period in French history was so incredibly tumultuous, following France and its colonial empire through three different republics, three monarchies, and two Napoleonic empires between 1789 and 1871.

 

We will begin with the crises of the Old Regime in the eighteenth century and the unfolding of the Revolution itself, and then examine the legacies of 1789 through the nineteenth-century “age of revolution.” Social and cultural change was no less dramatic than political life in this period, as France saw profound shifts in relationships between men and women, wealthy and poor, urban and rural dwellers, Parisians and provincials, artists and audiences, and metropolitan and colonized peoples. As we trace changing political ideas and practices from the fall of the Bastille to the last convulsions of the Paris Commune, we will consider the ways that industrialization, urbanization, the rise of mass culture, and colonial expansion helped to reshape French conceptions of national identity, rights and citizenship, and democracy itself.

 

Our main work for the semester will consist of interactive bi-weekly class meetings that combine lecture with discussion of readings, films, and other activities. We will use Tyler Stovall’s Transnational France as our guiding text, but spend a great deal of our time analyzing primary source documents, novels (Honoré de Balzac’s Eugénie Grandet, and Claire Duras’s Ourika), works by historians (including Alain Corbin, The Village of Cannibals), and films (Les Misérables, Gérminal). In addition to class participation, graded assignments will include weekly reading response posts, a group research project and short (4-5 page) individual essay on the French Revolution, three hourly tests, and a take-home final exam.

 

Maximum Enrollment: 
30
Course Type: 

New Course in European History

France in Age Revol 1789-1871
HIEU
2559
Undergraduate
Fall
2017

France in the Age of Revolution, 1789-1871

 

The French Revolution has long been considered a foundational event in modern world history. But 1789 was only the beginning of France’s long revolutionary experience. From the outbreak of revolution in the summer of 1789 to the end of the bloody Paris Commune in May 1871, the French brought about at least four revolutionary changes of government. In this course, we will explore why this period in French history was so incredibly tumultuous, following France and its colonial empire through three different republics, three monarchies, and two Napoleonic empires between 1789 and 1871.

 

We will begin with the crises of the Old Regime in the eighteenth century and the unfolding of the Revolution itself, and then examine the legacies of 1789 through the nineteenth-century “age of revolution.” Social and cultural change was no less dramatic than political life in this period, as France saw profound shifts in relationships between men and women, wealthy and poor, urban and rural dwellers, Parisians and provincials, artists and audiences, and metropolitan and colonized peoples. As we trace changing political ideas and practices from the fall of the Bastille to the last convulsions of the Paris Commune, we will consider the ways that industrialization, urbanization, the rise of mass culture, and colonial expansion helped to reshape French conceptions of national identity, rights and citizenship, and democracy itself.

 

Our main work for the semester will consist of interactive bi-weekly class meetings that combine lecture with discussion of readings, films, and other activities. We will use Tyler Stovall’s Transnational France as our guiding text, but spend a great deal of our time analyzing primary source documents, novels (Honoré de Balzac’s Eugénie Grandet, and Claire Duras’s Ourika), works by historians (including Alain Corbin, The Village of Cannibals), and films (Les Misérables, Gérminal). In addition to class participation, graded assignments will include weekly reading response posts, a group research project and short (4-5 page) individual essay on the French Revolution, three hourly tests, and a take-home final exam.

Maximum Enrollment: 
40
Course Type: 

American History to 1865

HIUS
2001
Undergraduate
Fall
2018

HI US 2001: A SURVEY OF AMERICAN HISTORY TO 1865.

This course examines the formation and early history of the United States. We will explore the lives of ordinary people as well as the actions of national leaders. The course will focus on the interplay of freedom and slavery, of prosperity and poverty, and of power and dispossession. By learning how past generations lived and acted, and how historians reconstruct the past, you will deepen your own perspective on contemporary America.

This course also means to challenge and develop your abilities to reason critically from diverse evidence and to argue persuasively in support of your conclusions.

FORMAT:  The class will meet twice a week for lectures and there will be a discussion section.  The discussion sections will serve as workshops to improve your writing, and teach you how to interpret the past based on evidence in primary source documents.

READINGS: There will be four books:

(1) Alan Taylor, Colonial America: A Very Short Introduction (New York: Oxford University Press, 2012);  (2) Bruce Levine, Half Slave and Half Free: The Roots of Civil War (New York: Hill & Wang, revised edition, 2005); (3) Edmund S. Morgan, Birth of the Republic (Chicago: University of Chicago Press– paperback edition); (4) Eric Foner, ed., Voices of Freedom: A Documentary History, Vol. 1 (New York: WW Norton Co., 2016 – 5th Edition).

ASSIGNMENTS:  There will be two brief writing assignments (1-3 pages each), and one longer paper (5-7 pages), plus a mid-term exam and a final exam. 

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
120
Course Type: 
Discussion Sections: 
6

History of Modern India

HISA
2003
Undergraduate
Fall
2018

 

HISA 2003

History of Modern India

Monday and Wednesday, 2 pm – 3:15 pm

 

A survey course, major topics include conflict and accommodation in the Indo-Islamic world; change and continuity under colonial rule; competing ideas on the shape and substance of a new India; and the Partition of the subcontinent in 1947. This course is the first of a two-semester sequence: in the spring we will focus on Twentieth Century South Asia.

 

Course requirements include attendance and active participation in class (15%); a book review (20%); a midterm exam (25%); and a final exam (40%).

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
60
Course Type: 

New Course in General History

Climate History
HIST
2559
Undergraduate
Fall
2018

In this lecture course, we will explore the history of the earth's climate and how it relates to human history. In the first part of our course, we will learn about the history and development of climate science and the methods of studying changes in the earth's climate. In the second part of our course, we will learn about historical climatology and the ways in which historians employ the findings and methods of climate science in their writing about the human past. In the final weeks of the semester, we will explore political and cultural facets of climate in history.

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
40
Course Type: 

History of the Russian Empire 1700-1917

HIEU
2152
Undergraduate
Fall
2018

Are you curious about the ongoing conflict between Russia and Ukraine? . . . or why Vladimir Putin meddled in last year's U.S. presidential election?  Many explanations of contemporary events lie in Russia's imperial past, when it ruled over not only Ukraine but also Poland, Finland, Georgia, Armenia, and Central Asia (a sixth of the earth's land area, all told), yet still harbored an enormous inferiority complex vis-à-vis the countries of Western Europe. 

            We will begin with the reign of Peter the Great, and cover two centuries in which the Romanov dynasty struggled to bring Russia into the ranks of European and world powers by pursuing its economic, social, and cultural transformation, and by conquering ever more territories and populations.  At the same time the tsars insisted on preserving many of Russia's traditional and distinctive features, including autocratic rule itself.  This precarious situation ultimately led to social and political revolution, but almost as soon as tsarist rule ended in 1917, Russia and much of the empire were taken over by a new dictatorship, that of the Bolsheviks (Communists) under Vladimir I. Lenin.  (This year of course marks the centennial of Russia's 1917 revolutions.)

            About half the course is devoted to the last sixty years of the imperial (tsarist) period, from defeat in the Crimean War and implementation of the so-called Great Reforms (beginning with the abolition of serfdom), concluding with close analysis of the revolutions of 1905, February 1917, and October 1917.  Special attention will be paid to the tsarist social hierarchy and the governance of diverse ethno-national populations.

You will be expected to read between 100 and 200 pages per week.  The overview text is A History of Russia (vol. 1: to 1917) by Walter Moss.  Being at the introductory level, the course is intended to teach you to think as historians do, and to consider the various types of sources that can be brought to bear on historical analysis.  We'll be doing our own interpretation of a wide range of textual primary sources on tsarist Russia:  literary classics such as the theatrical farce The Government Inspector (Nikolai Gogol), the novels Fathers and Children (Ivan Turgenev) and Hadji Murad (Leo Tolstoy), as well as shorter selections such as government documents and memoir excerpts by revolutionary activists, factory workers, and peasants.  Graded work will include a map quiz, two take-home midterms, one 5-6 pp. paper, and a comprehensive final exam.

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
40
Course Type: 

The Modern World: Global History since 1760

HIST
2002
Undergraduate
Fall
2018

The course traces a historical arc beginning with the Encounter in America after 1492, continuing with the emergence of global capitalism,  to the turbulence of contemporary populism on a global scale. Twice-weekly lecture/discussion and once-weekly sections will consider primary and secondary sources and discuss what it means to think historically in global terms.

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
120
Course Type: 
Discussion Sections: 
6

New Course in United States History

African American History 1865
HIUS
2559
Undergraduate
Fall
2018

In this course, students will explore the history of people of African descent in the United States, from their forced arrival in North America to the end of the Civil War.  We will discuss major events in early African-American history to consider how the twin engines of slavery and freedom shaped the lives of millions of African and African-American people in the United States.  Students will consider how social, economic, political, and legal frameworks established between the colonial era and the Civil War influenced the lived experiences of African-American people.  Topics will include: pre-colonial West and Central Africa, the trans-Atlantic slave trade, the development of North American slavery, resistance and revolution in Atlantic slave communities, gradual emancipation laws, economics of slavery, the gendered experience in slavery and freedom, and black people’s participation in anti-slavery politics.  In addition, this course will introduce students to early-African American history in trans-national perspective.  For example, we will discuss the trans-Atlantic origins of American slavery and the enduring legacy of the slave revolt in St. Domingue.  Every week, students will read, interpret, and discuss a variety of primary and secondary sources.  These readings will help students understand the role of African-descended people in the making of the United States to 1865.

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
20
Course Type: 

Modern China

HIEA
2031
Undergraduate
Fall
2018

At the turn of the 20th century, China was one of the poorest nations in the world. Its 2,000 year old system of government was crumbling, large segments of its population were impoverished or starving, and the country seemed powerless to defend itself against repeated foreign intrusion. Once known as the “sick man of Asia,” China today is a global power with world-wide strategic, economic and political influence.

This course is about the people, personalities, and events that have given this remarkable transformation its dramatic and sometimes tragic tone. It is also about the social, political, and cultural currents that lay beneath these more visible manifestations of change and the profound effect these forces have had on the Chinese people. Following a brief consideration of the political and social institutions of the last imperial dynasty (the Qing, 1644-1911), we will examine the interaction of foreign aggression and domestic social crises that led first to the fall of the imperial order and the establishment of a Republic in 1911 and then to the founding of the People's Republic of China in 1949. From here we move on to the post-'49 period under the leadership of the Chinese Communist Party (CCP), a period that has been described as the greatest attempt at revolutionary social transformation in world history. In the final weeks of the course, we will look at the post-Mao reform era and the issues facing China today after nearly a century of revolution.

Reading assignments, drawn from a survey textbook (R. Keith Schoppa, Revolution and its Past) as well as other secondary and translated primary sources, will average about 125 pages per week. Grades for the course will be based on a mid-term exam (25%), a final exam (30%), an eight-page essay (30%) and attendance and participation in discussion sections (15%).

Course Instructor: 
Maximum Enrollment: 
160
Course Type: 
Discussion Sections: 
9

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Corcoran Department of History
University of Virginia
Nau Hall - South Lawn
Charlottesville, VA 22904

  

Contact:
(434) 924-7147
(434) 924-7891
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